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E P L FORM NO. 609: to.?e.32 teoM. 



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•lie Document 



No. 48 




Qtye Commontoealtl) of fflaxtatfyMtM 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan District Commission 



For the Year 1925 



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OBLIGATION OF THIB DOCUMENT APPBOTM) BY THE COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 



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of Park Engineering 



Watertown 



CONTENTS 

I. Organization and Administration 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement . 

III. Construction .... 

IV. Parks and Reservations 
V. Police Department 

VI. Rainfall and Consumption of Water 
VII. Special Investigations 
Till. Other Reports .... 
Report of the Director of Parks 
Report of the Director and Chief Engineer 
Parkways ...... 

Reservations 

Bridges and Locks .... 

General 

Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 
Low Service Pipe Lines 
Northern High Service Pipe Lines . 
Southern High Service Pipe Line 
Improvement of Service in Belmont and 
Meters and Connections 
Improving Wachusett Watershed 
Authorized Extension of Works 
Maintenance . .... 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 
Storage Reservoirs .... 
Wachusett Reservoir 
Sudbury Reservoir .... 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 . 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton 

and Whitehall Reservoirs . 
Farm Pond .... 
Lake Cochituate 
Aqueducts .... 
Wachusett Aqueduct 
Sudbury Aqueduct . 
Weston Aqueduct 
Cochituate Aqueduct 
Protection of Water Supply 
Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 

Forestry 

Hydroelectric Service . 
Wachusett Service . 
Sudbury Service 
Distribution Pumping Stations . 
Distribution Reservoirs 
Distribution Buildings and Grounds 
Distribution Pipe Lines 
Consumption of Water 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes 
Water supplied from Metropolitan Water Works and used out- 
side of Metropolitan Water District 
Filtration of Water .... 
Water Works Statistics 



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11 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division 
Organization .... 
Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations 
Metropolitan Sewers 
Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Arlington 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer — Section 78 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer— Section 79 
Maintenance ...... 

Scope of Work and Force employed 
Deer Island Pumping Station 
East Boston Pumping Station 
Charlestown Pumping Station 
Ward Street Pumping Station 
Nut Island Screen-house 
Gasolene in Public Sewers . 
Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage 
to Metropolitan Sewerage System 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Whole Metropolitan System 
Pumping Stations 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 
Material intercepted at the Screens 
Financial Statement .... 

Parks Division 

Water Division 

Sewerage Division .... 
Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Parks Divi- 
sion made and pending during the Year 1925 
Appendix No. 2. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water 

Works made and pending during the Year 1925 
Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metro- 
politan Water Works 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on 

the Metropolitan Water Works in 1925 . 
Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 

1925 

Table No. 3. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1925 .... 
Table No. 4. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water 

Storage and Rainfall in 1925 .... 
Table No. 5. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1925 .... 
Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which 

Water has been drawn for the Supply of the 
Metropolitan Water District 
Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1925 by Months .... 
Table No. 8. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of 

Water by Districts in Cities and Towns supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1925 
Table No. 9. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of 

Water in Cities and Towns supplied by Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1925 .... 



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Appendix No. 3 — Concluded PAQB 

Table No. 10. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the 

Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton . . . .103 

Table No. 11. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sud- 
bury Reservoir 104 

Table No. 12. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham 104 

Table No. 13. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake 

Cochituate 105 

Table No. 14. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at 

the State House, Boston 105 

Table No. 15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet 

in Boston, 1898-1925 106 

Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in 

Water from various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works, 1898-1925 . . . . .106 

Table No. 17. — - Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1925 .... 107 

Table No. 18. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1925 108 

Table No. 19. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main 

Lines and Connections and Number of Valves 
set in Same, December 31, 1925 . . . 109 

Table No. 20. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, 

Blow-off and Drain Pipes, December 31, 1925 109 

Table No. 21. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines 

and Connections and Water Pipes Four Inches 
in Diameter and Larger in the Several Cities 
and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan 
Water Works, December 31, 1925 . . .110 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of 

Services metered, Fire Services, and Fire Hy- 
drants in the Several Cities and Towns supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 
31, 1925 . Ill 

Table No. 23. — Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet 

above Boston City Base for each Month at 
Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

during 1925 .112 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts made and pendiag during the year 1925 — 

Sewerage Division 114 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court 

on January 19, 1926 . . . . . .117 



• 2 1 



REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT 

COMMISSION 

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts in General Court assembled 
The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented to your 
Honorable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements and liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for 
the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1925, and now, in accordance with 
the provisions of section 100 of chapter 92 of the General Laws, presents 
a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar year ending on December 
31, 1925. 

SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Commission, Officers and Employees 

The term of office of George B. Wason expired on November 30, 1925, 
and no appointment or reappointment has as yet been made to fill the 
vacancy. The membership of the Commission therefore remains the same 
as in the preceding year: Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner; Frank A. 
Bayrd, Frank G. Hall, William H. Squire and George B. Wason, Associate 
Commissioners. Frank G. Hall is Director of Parks, John R. Rablin, 
Director of Park Engineering, William E. Foss, Director of the Water 
Division and Frederick D. Smith, Director of the Sewerage Division. 

George Lyman Rogers has continued as secretary and the following as 
chief engineers: of parks, John R. Rablin; of water, William E. Foss; of 
sewerage, Frederick D. Smith. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 1,583, divided 
as follows: general offices, 24; parks, 951; water, 393; sewerage, 215. 

In this tabulation of employees the police are included under parks, 
although they give considerable protection to portions of the water system. 



II. GENERAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Year ending November 30, 1925 

Expenditure for construction $2,835,231 03 

Expenditure for maintenance 3,185,092 02 

Total expenditure .. 6,020,323 05 

Unexpended balance, maintenance appropriations . . 611,148 23 

Serial bonds issued 2,355,000 00 

Serial bonds paid 306,243 75 

Loan notes issued 1,800,000 00 

Loan notes paid 800,000 00 

Increase in sinking funds 2,075,329 37 

Increase in net debt 973,926 88 

On November 30, 1925 / 
Net debt $43,116,781 82 

III. CONSTRUCTION 

The first section of the Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Arlington and Medford 
was completed during the year and work upon the second section started. 

Extensive repairs to two pumping units at the Deer Island Station have 
been made and the head houses at Shirley Gut have been rebuilt. The 
work of installing the new Morris pump and Nordberg engine at the Ward 
Street Station was completed and they were put into service April 17 and 
have proved very satisfactory. 

The new Weston Aqueduct water supply main from the terminal chamber 
at Weston to the old Mystic station in Somerville has been completed and 



2 ; j 

the 48-inch line from this point through Boston Avenue to College , 

Medford, has also been completed. The section of the Weston 1 t 

supply main as far as Arlington Centre was put into service during the year 
and the rest of these lines will be tested and put into service early in the 
coming year. 

The additional Northern High-service line in Maiden has been about 
one-half constructed and will be completed and put into service during the 
coming year. 

Preliminary work has been started upon the new Southern High-service 
line. 

The Arsenal Street Bridge over the Charles River has been completed and 
opened to traffic and the River Street Bridge has been constructed and will 
be surfaced and ready for use as soon as the weather in the spring permits. 

Work on the Old Colony Parkway has progressed during the year. The 
Mt. Vernon and the Patten's Cove bridges have been constructed and will 
be ready for traffic when required. The section from Columbia Road to 
Fox Point is about filled to subgrade. The fill across Dorchester Bay should 
be completed during the first part of the coming year. Construction of 
the bridge over the channel in Dorchester Bay, as well as the railroad 
bridge at Pope's Hill, should be started during the coming year. 

Construction plans for the Northern Traffic Route have been completed, 
the takings made and settlements for damages are progressing. Construc- 
tion work will start early in the spring. 

All the necessary assents required for the Cottage Farm Bridge were 
finally secured last October and unless some further difficulty is encoun- 
tered, construction should start early in the spring. 

Private funds have been given for a new foot bridge opposite the Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administration over the Charles River. Pre- 
liminary studies and construction plans are under way. 

The new electric lighting system on the Revere Beach Reservation from 
Eliot Circle to Northern Circle was installed and the lights were turned on 
in June. The next section of electric lighting, from Eliot Circle, Revere, 
to the Middlesex Fells Parkway has been started and about one-half com- 
pleted. 

About six miles of roadway have been reconstructed and resurfaced with 
bituminous macadam by contract during the year, in addition to the ordi- 
nary roadway repairs and improvements. The reconstruction work was 
distributed over parts of the Blue Hills Parkway, Furnace Brook Parkway, 
Memorial Drive and Middlesex Fells parkways. 

Surveys and plans for the extension of the West Roxbury Parkway from 
Weld Street to Newton Street have been completed and the section will be 
constructed during the coming year. 

Extensive repairs were required and have been made to the drawbridge 
at Charles River Dam. The structures had become weakened through 
corrosion during the fifteen years of operation. 

The tide water dam at Black's Creek, Quincy Shore, was completed 
July 31st. 

An additional taking has been made for the Quannapowitt Parkway, 
in Wakefield, to give an outlet on to Main Street without interference with 
the ice houses upon the old line of taking. The work of filling for con- 
struction will start early in the coming year. 

IV. PARKS AND RESERVATIONS 

During the year the usual work of maintenance of the Parks and Reser- 
vations has been carried on by the labor forces of the Commission. The 
growing use each year by the public of the parks and reservations, particu- 
larly of the crowded bathing resorts, adds to the work of the force. 

The beaches are patronized each year in ever larger numbers by the 
public, although the bath houses do not show much increased use. Each 
year the larger number of automobiles makes the metropolitan areas avail- 



P. D. 48 3 

able to a larger number of people and adds to the burdens of upkeep and 
maintenance as well as to the difficulties of traffic regulation. 

During the year two hundred and eighty-five acres have been added to 
the Middlesex Fells Reservation by purchase from the estate of Samuel C. 
Lawrence. The former owners had developed the property similarly to 
the land in the reservation and allowed it to be used by the public and its 
addition to the reservation will save from private development this section 
of land which for many years has been practically a part of the Fells. 

During the year much of the tree spraying for gypsy moths and other 
plant insects was discontinued, as it was hoped that it would not be required. 
It is doubtful, however, if these pests can be kept in hand without greater 
effort in the following years. 

The Commission gave 125 band concerts during the summer, at an expense 
.of $19,668.56. 

V. POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The police force remains substantially the same as in previous years, 
and consists now of six captains, four lieutenants, one lieutenant inspector, 
seventeen sergeants, one detective sergeant, one hundred thirty-four patrol- 
men and one policewoman, a total of one hundred sixty-four. During the 
summer season thirty-seven temporary patrolmen and two policewomen 
were employed. During the year two captains were retired, one sergeant 
died, five patrolmen were retired, one resigned, and one was discharged. 
Nine new members have been added to the force. 

The work of the police department each year increases with the growing 
use of the metropolitan roadways and reservations, involving a larger 
amount of business. The automobile traffic is heavier each year and its 
regulation is more difficult. It is to the credit of the department that it 
has continued to maintain its efficiency without any increase in numbers. 

VI. RAINFALL AND CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

While the precipitation on the watersheds during the year was only a 
little below the average, the yield of the watersheds was over 20 per cent 
below normal. The Wachusett Reservoir did not fill last spring. It rose 
to elevation 386.19, 8.81 feet below high- water mark on April 27, from 
which level it was drawn down to 369.60, the lowest level since the reservoir 
first filled, and 25.40 feet below high-water mark. The rains of December 
caused the reservoir to rise to 373.48 on December 31, 6.69 feet below the 
level on the same date in the previous year. Considering the lower level to 
which the reservoir filled in the spring, the decrease during the year in the 
amount stored is not necessarily alarming, considering also the unusual 
draft by the City of Worcester. With a normal precipitation during the 
winter months, the reservoir should fill to at least the same level as this 
year. However, the demands of consumption have approximately reached 
the yields of the watersheds and it is unwise to delay longer acquiring addi- 
tional sources of supply. 

The investigation authorized by Chapter 126 of 1923 of methods of puri- 
fication by filtration of the waters of the South Sudbury has been completed. 
A process of coagulation and slow sand filtration has been found to be 
effective and practical and will make available this source of supply now 
owned, but not used. 

The Metropolitan Water Supply Investigating Commission has com- 
pleted its investigations and filed its report December 1st. With this 
report as well as the 1922 report of the Joint Board before it, the Legisla- 
ture has sufficient information to enable it to decide where the District, 
as well as the City of Worcester, should look for additional supplies. Some 
definite plan should be authorized and construction work started this coming 
year. 

The town of Brookline became a member of the District during the year 
under an agreement by which the town is to use its own available supply 
and the District is to furnish the excess water required. 



4 \ 

During the year 46,847,678,000 gallons of water were furnishec 
18 cities and towns regularly supplied, equivalent to a daily average con- 
sumption of 128,349,800 gallons, and for the population of 1,303,000 at the 
rate of 99 gallons per capita per day, an increase of 2 gallons per capita 
over 1924, on the basis of the 1925 census. 

VII. SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 13 of the Resolves of 1925 
the Commission investigated and reported as to the advisability and expe- 
diency of establishing a public comfort station on or near the Lynn Shore 
Reservation, in the vicinity of King's Beach. The report is printed as 
House Document 1 of 1926. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 12 of the Resolves of 1925 
the Commission investigated and reported on the necessity and feasibility 
of protecting the purity and sanitary condition and of regulating the flow 
of water in the watershed and stream and tributaries thereof, known as St. 
Mary's Brook, in Medford and Maiden. The report is printed as House 
Document 216 of 1926. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 16 of the Resolves of 1925 
the Commission has considered the subject matter of House Document 
1102 of 1925 relative to the construction of an additional main sewer in 
the valley of the Aberjona River in Stoneham and Wakefield, and particu- 
larly whether any part of the cost of said sewer should be borne by the 
North Metropolitan Sewerage District and if so, what part and how to be 
apportioned. The report is printed as House Document 217 of 1926. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 14 of the Resolves of 1925 
the Commission has considered the advisability and cost of acquiring as a 
metropolitan park reservation an area suitable for a public reservation 
with boating and bathing facilities on both sides of the Charles River and 
adjacent to the Spring Street Bridge connecting Boston and Dedham. 
The report is printed as House Document 324 of 1926. 

VIII. OTHER REPORTS 

The reports of the Directors of Parks, Park Engineering, Water and 
Sewerage, with tables, statistics and financial statements, are herewith 
presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVIS B. KENISTON, 

Metropolitan District Co?nmissioner. 
February 27, 1926. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PARKS 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

My Dear Sir: — As customary, I submit herewith a report in regard to 
the work and conditions in the Parks Division of the Metropolitan District 
Commission, for the year ending December 31, 1925, which comes under 
my general supervision as Director of Parks. 

During the past year there have been several important changes in the 
Police Department. Captain Edward M. W. Brawley, who had served the 
department faithfully and well for 25 years, was retired on November 12, 
1925, because of ill health, brought on from worry and over-work. He will 
be greatly missed in the Middlesex Fells Division, where, as Captain, he 
had charge of the police and the care of approximately 2,000 acres of reser- 
vation land and 40 miles of roads. Lieutenant Edward M. Woods, who 
has been in our department for 25 years, and had been carefully trained 
by the late Superintendent Herbert W. West, was chosen for this post, 
and was placed in charge of Middlesex Fells Division and promoted to the 
rank of Captain on November 16, 1925. 



P. D. 48 5 

Captain Elmer E. Bickford, of Nantasket Beach Division, was retired 
also, on October 30, 1925, after 26 years on our force. For 15 years he 
handled the Nantasket Beach Division most successfully, having no serious 
trouble, although thousands of people thronged the reservation each sum- 
mer. The affairs of this division have been cared for in a business-like 
manner and with credit to the Commission. Lieutenant Frank D. Breivogel 
was given charge of the division and promoted to the rank of Captain on 
November 12, 1925. Captain Breivogel has been the drill master of the 
Metropolitan District Police for many years and has a splendid record, 
having served at the Charles River Division, Lower Basin, during the later 
years. 

The department met with a great loss in the death of Sergeant William H. 
Chaisson, who died October 29, 1925. He was stationed in the Charles 
River Upper Division for many years and was a most efficient officer. 

Sergeant Burton A. Murray and Detective-Sergeant John H. Connolly 
have been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant during the year. Officers 
George W. Arbuckle, Joseph P. F. Rooney and William C. Martin have 
been promoted to rank of Sergeant. Our force is now composed of 6 
captains, 4 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant-inspector, 17 sergeants, 1 detective- 
sergeant, 134 patrolmen and 1 policewoman. During the summer 37 
patrolmen were added for temporary service, and two temporary police- 
women were employed. During the past twelve months 3,365 arrests 
have been made by the police department. The number of arrests for the 
year ending November 30, 1924, was 4,313. The total amount of fines 
imposed was $28,844.00. 

In Charles River Upper Division, the old discarded stable in Brighton 
has been remodelled into a most useful police station. The grounds have 
been much improved by Captain Garrett and conditions at this headquarters 
are generally improved. 

Our police force are doing good work, as in the past. More motorcycles 
are needed, and motorcycles should replace horses where this is possible. 
I recommend the purchase of more traffic signals similar to those already 
in use at various points in the Park System. The pay of first-year patrolmen 
should be increased from SI, 540 per year to SI, 650 per year, and the tem- 
porary summer officers should be paid at the rate of $1,650 per year. A Dew 
motor boat for use in police work on Charles River Basin should be pur- 
chased. It will probably be necessary to increase the number of officers 
employed during the next summer. I recommend that some allowance be 
made the police captains of the various divisions for heating the houses 
in which they live. These houses are in badly exposed locations and the 
heating expense is heavy for men with small salaries. 

The traffic on the boulevards of the Commission is greatly congested in 
the summer months, and after careful study of the situation, the following 
rule in regard to busses was put into effect last July: — 

"No person shall have or operate a motor vehicle which has a seating 
capacity of more than eight persons upon any road, driveway or boulevard 
under the care and control of the Metropolitan District Commission, without 
a written permit therefor by said Commission." 

This rule seems to be working out to good advantage. One-way traffic 
in several places has helped to keep cars moving. 

I feel that this Commission should receive a greater part of the motor 
vehicle fees, as a large percentage of them is received from cars owned in 
the district. The cost of construction and maintenance of the parkways is 
largely for the benefit of the motorist, and should be paid for by him. 

The general work of construction of roads, bridges and parkways has 
been carried on with great success under the able supervision of our Chief 
Engineer and Director of Park Engineering, Mr. John R. Rablin. The 
work on Cottage Farm Bridge has been held up, but work is expected to 
be started before next summer and it should be completed by December, 
1927. The Arsenal Street, River Street and Western Avenue bridges have 
been practically completed and are open to traffic. Plans are in progress 



6 P. 

for the John W. Weeks Memorial Bridge over the Charles River op 
the Harvard School of Business Administration. The extension of west 
Roxbury Parkway to Newton Street is well under way. A large amount 
of filling has been deposited on the section of Old Colony Parkway between 
Columbia Road and Fox Point for building to subgrade. This section is 
nearly completed. Work of construction of the bridge at Mt. Vernon 
Street is in progress. About 8 miles of boulevard have been reconstructed 
during the year in the various divisions, at a cost of about $250,000. Where 
possible, the boulevards are being constructed at a width of forty feet. 
Plans have been completed and the taking made for the Northern Traffic 
Artery. Settlement with property owners is in progress, under the direc- 
tion of Frank W. Kaan. Over $550,000 has been expended for land settle- 
ments, and about $31,000 for appraisals, experts, etc. This work will 
include construction of a bridge over the southern division of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad. Plans have been prepared for construction of Quanna- 
powitt Parkway and work is to begin at once. I recommend that Revere 
Beach Parkway be widened from Middlesex Fells Parkway to Main Street, 
Everett, as this is now one of the most congested parts of the Park System. 
The lighting system at Revere Beach Reservation has been greatly im- 
proved by installation of electric lights. About $60,000 has been spent. 
Installation of electric lighting on Revere Beach Parkway has been started. 
A part of Revere Beach Boulevard has been resurfaced. Repairs have 
been made in both Revere Beach Bath House and Nahant Beach Bath 
House. These bath houses were constructed many years ago and extensive 
repairs are needed from time to time. I recommend that the bath house 
lockers and yards be gradually rebuilt with more up-to-date fire-proof 
buildings. This work is also needed at Nantasket Beach Bath House. 
Although the Commission has voted to report that no more bath houses are 
needed, I feel that conditions at Mystic Lakes warrant the building of a 
suitable bath house, which should be conducted in a proper manner, with 
adequate policing. Many complaints have been received on this subject 
during the past summer. I also recommend that a sanitary building be 
constructed for convenience of the thousands who visit Lynn Shore Reser- 
vation. The band stand at Nahant has been repaired and put in condition 
to last several years more. 

The band concerts given by the Commission have been much enjoyed, 
as in previous years. One hundred and twenty-six concerts were given 
during the season of 1925. In 1917, 372 were given; in 1918, 353; in 1919, 
349. I believe that more concerts should be given next year at Nantasket, 
Broadway Park, Somerville, and W T akefield, where the concerts are greatly 
appreciated. 

The trails we have made in the Blue Hills and Middlesex Fells have 
become very popular and are thoroughly enjoyed by the lovers of the great 
outdoors. The people seem to enjoy them more in winter in recent years, 
finding plenty of tramping ground in the Parks District without taking long 
journeys into other states. Many children and grown-ups, too, visit our 
collection of animals at Spot Pond, and the number of animals should be 
increased. The nursery has been a success, and much money has been 
saved by furnishing trees and shrubs for planting in the various reservations 
and parkways. The nursery is now in need of being re-stocked. 

In connection with the settlement of the estate of General Samuel C. 
Lawrence, an opportunity was afforded to purchase about three hundred 
acres of woodland adjacent to the Middlesex Fells Reservation on the 
southwest side. This land has great natural attractions and had been 
maintained and improved by the owner with good taste and at considerable 
expense. For many years it had been used by the public and it was natur- 
ally a part of the Fells Reservation. There was strong public interest in 
its acquisition by the Commonwealth and an appropriation of $160,000 
was made by the Legislature for this purpose, so that it is now the property 
of the Metropolitan District Commission. 

Inquiries have been made of the Commission in the past on the subject 



P. D. 48 7 

of providing golf courses in the Metropolitan Parks. Our department 
is much behind other parts of the country in this respect, and there are 
several fine locations for links under our jurisdiction. Golf is a popular 
sport at the present time, and the demand seems to warrant some provision 
for this health-giving sport. It seems as though the courses could be made 
self-supporting. The Lawrence estate would be a particularly good loca- 
tion, provided it could be developed. The Sheepfold would furnish another 
good spot; there are several good locations in Blue Hills Reservation; 
and a 9-hole course could be laid out in Riverside Recreation Grounds. 

In my judgment, the time has come when the Commission should be 
provided with sufficient funds to set apart, at least in Middlesex Fells and 
the Blue Hills reservations, sufficient land to be used for automobile camp 
sites, with every possible facility for the convenience of visiting motorists. 

Such a step would be in keeping with the progress and enterprise of every 
Western city and would offer to visitors, particularly from other states, a 
most cordial welcome. 

Incidentally, such camp sites will materially help business, as it has been 
again and again proven that these visiting motorists spend large sums of 
money with the merchants of the towns contiguous to the location of these 
camp sites. 

Complaints have been received with respect to the public boat landing 
in the northeast corner of the Charles River Basin. It is rather an old- 
fashioned wooden affair, which is entirely out of keeping with its surround- 
ings. This would be an ideal location for a modern landing of stone con- 
struction, which might be dedicated as a memorial to some of our great men. 

The 200,000 white pine seedlings planted in the Blue Hills and Stony 
Brook Reservations have now shown enough growth to improve greatly the 
appearance of the many acres of our holdings in this section. 

My recommendations of last year have nearly all been carried out, with 
the exception of a single most needed one which has been allowed to lie 
dormant because of the delay in building the Cottage Farm Bridge. This 
is the building of the road along the east side of the Charles River from 
Bay State Road to North Harvard Street. I feel this road should be built 
at the earliest date possible. 

For the fifth time, let me call attention to the amount of our budget, 
which was $2,204,595.38 for the past year, giving an idea of the work being 
done by this department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK G. HALL, Director of Parks. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF PARK ENGINEERING 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — I submit the following report of the work done under the 
supervision and direction of the Engineering Department of the Parks 
Division, during the year ending December 31, 1925. 

The engineering force remains substantially the same as last year and 
the organization has averaged as follows: one Chief Engineer, 1 senior 
assistant engineer, 11 assistant engineers, 2 inspectors, 2 designing engineers, 
25 engineering assistants, 4 clerks and stenographers, 1 garage foreman, 
1 supervisor of machinery, 1 electrical engineer superintendent and 45 
bridge and lock attendants. 

Sixteen new contracts have been made during the year for work of con- 
struction, including two bridges over the Charles River Basin, costing 
$450,000, two bridges and filling for Old Colony Parkway, costing about 
$800,000, and the reconstruction of about eight miles of boulevard varying 
in width from 30 to 40 feet, the cost of which was about $250,000. 

The work under these sixteen contracts has been completed except in 
three instances, the bridge over Charles River Basin at River Street, the 



8 P. D. 

bridge for Old Colony Parkway over Mt. Vernon Street and the fillin/ 
Dorchester Bay for Old Colony Parkway. 

These two bridges are substantially completed, but cannot be surfaced 
on account of winter weather. The filling in Dorchester Bay for Old Col- 
ony Parkway is progressing rapidly, but will probably not be wholly com- 
pleted until spring. 

Plans have been completed and the land taken for the Northern Traffic 
Artery through Cambridge and Somerville, the estimated cost of which is, 
for land $1,400,000 and for construction $1,000,000. 

Surveys and plans have been completed for the taking of land for an 
extension of West Roxbury Parkway from Weld Street to Newton Street, 
for which the estimated cost of land and construction is about $220,000. 

Preliminary studies and construction plans are in progress for two new 
bridges over the Charles River Basin, one at Cottage Farm Bridge site 
and one opposite the site of the new Harvard Graduate School of Business 
Administration, two new bridges in Old Colony Parkway, one across Dor- 
chester Bay and one for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad 
over the parkway near Pope's Hill Station; and one bridge for the Northern 
Traffic Artery over the Southern Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

The department has also had charge of the maintenance, operation and 
repairs of drawbridges, dams, locks and gates and general supervision of 
repair and maintenance of roads and structures in the various divisions. 

The installation of an electric street lighting system consisting of 108 
magnetite arc lamps with underground cables and ornamental posts in 
Revere Beach Reservation has been completed. The work of extending 
the electric street lighting installation in Revere Beach Parkway from the 
southerly end of Revere Beach Reservation to Middlesex Fells Parkway, 
a distance of five and a quarter miles, is in progress. The type of lamps to 
be used in this section is 600 candle-power incandescent lamps hung from 
bracket arms on twenty-foot steel poles. There will be 190 lamps served 
by underground cables. 

The cost of conducting the department has been as follows : 

Engineering: 

Construction: 

Services $55,103 50 

Expenses 3,204 34 

$58,307 84 

Maintenance : 

Services $32,336 03 

Expenses 2,505 02 34,841 05 



Total $93,148 89 

The following is a detailed list of the work done under the direction of 
the Engineering Department. 

Parkways 

Alewife Brook Parkway. — A section of Alewife Brook between Massa- 
chusetts Avenue and Henderson Street has been dredged to provide the 
required depth of water. The brook shoals to some extent and it has been 
the practice to dredge a section each year to maintain the proper depths of 
water. The plant for the work was furnished by the Commission and 
the labor by Coleman Brothers at a cost of about $2,000^00. 

Blue Hills Parkway. — Concrete sidewalks have been built in both sides 
of Blue Hills Parkway where the abutters petitioned and agreed to pay 
one-half the cost of same. Five thousand, two hundred and forty-four square 
feet of walk has been built under contract with John A. McCarthy at a 
rate of 28 cents per square foot, a total cost of $1,468.32, one-half of which 
was paid by the abutters. 

Contract No. 80: Bids were received on April 30, 1925, for reconstructing 
with bituminous macadam a section of the easterly roadway of Blue Hills 



P. D. 48 9 

Parkway, about 1,750 feet in length and 36 feet in width. The contract 
was awarded to A. W. Loud, lowest bidder, and the work was begun May 
11, 1925, and completed July 29, 1925, at a total cost of $9,071.79. 

Cambridge Parkway. — Contract No. 79 : The section of Memorial 
Drive between Massachusetts Avenue and Brookline Street, Cambridge, 
5,800 feet in length and 30 feet in width, has been reconstructed with bitum- 
inous macadam. Bids were received on April 23, 1925, and the contract 
awarded to the lowest bidders, Reynolds Bros., Inc. The work was begun 
May 4, 1925, and completed July 22, 1925, at a total cost of $35,552.51. 

Furnace Brook Parkway. — Contract No. 70: The work of constructing 
half-tide dam at Black's Creek, for which bids were received in July, 1924, 
has been completed. The City of Quincy was required under the act 
authorizing the construction of the dam to pay one-half the cost. The 
City paid its portion in the spring of this year and the contract was awarded 
to W. A. Norton Companv, the lowest bidders. The work was begun 
March 17, 1925, and completed July 31, 1925, at a total cost of $13,530.22. 

The effect of retaining the tide water in the basin of the creek west of 
the parkway drive, has been very beneficial in the improvement of the scenic 
effect and in the provision of bathing facilities during the period of low 
water in the bay. Many bathers have taken advantage of the opportunity. 

Contract No. 80: Bids were received on April 30, 1925, for reconstruction 
with bituminous macadam, the section of roadway from Adams Street 
to Newport Avenue, Quincy, together with the bids for the work in Blue 
Hills . Parkway , and was awarded to the same contractor, A. W. Loud, 
lowest bidder. The work was begun May 11. 1925. and was completed 
July 29, 1925, at a total cost of $21,593.96. The total length is 4,000 feet 
and width 36 feet. 

Contract No. 86: The work of reconstructing with bituminous macadam 
the surface of the parkway on the section along Quincy Bay from Fenno 
Street to Pilgrim Highway, Quincy, was awarded to E. C. Sargent, lowest 
bidder. The length of this section is 3,400 feet and the width 40 feet. 
Work was begun August 6, 1925, and completed October 20, 1925, at a total 
cost of $48,086.66. 

Middlesex Fells Parkway. — Several sections of this parkway have been 
reconstructed with bituminous macadam as follows: — 

Under contract No. 82 with the Rowe Contracting Company, the work 
of reconstructing the section from Wellington Bridge to Riverside Avenue, 
westerly roadway, length 1,900 feet, width 40 feet, and 1,550 feet 26 feet 
in width, and from Middlesex Avenue to Riverside Avenue, easterly road- 
wav, length 1,550 feet, width 36 feet, was begun June 11, 1925, and com- 
pleted August 20, 1925, at a total cost of $31,869.54. 

Under contract No. 83 with James H. Fannon, work of constructing 
sections from Fulton Street to Forest Street, easterly roadway, length 
1,500 feet, width 36 feet, and from the Boston & Maine Railroad Bridge to 
Salem Street, easterly roadway, Maiden and Medford, length 3,000 feet, 
width 36 feet, was begun June 11, 1925, and completed July 10, 1925, at a 
total cost of $21,414.85. 

Under Contract No. 88 with Coleman Brothers, the work of reconstruc- 
tion of the sections from Wellington Bridge to Mystic Avenue, westerly 
roadway, length 1,300 feet, width 30 feet, Salem Street to Forest Street, 
southerly roadway, length 4,800 feet, width 26 feet, and 180 feet, 35 feet 
in width, and Pond Street in the Middlesex Fells Reservation from Wood- 
land Road to Washington Street, Stoneham, 1,900 feet in length and 25 
feet in width, was begun September 17, 1925, and completed November 17, 
1925, at a total cost of $38,831.34. 

Northern Traffic Artery. — The work of making surveys and preparing 
plans for acquiring the land for the Northern Traffic Artery, authorized by 
Chapter 489, Acts 1924, has been completed. The takings have been made, 
damages awarded and betterments assessed. The work of removing the 
buildings will progress as fast as settlements are made, and it is expected 
to begin the work of construction in the spring. 



J 



10 P. D. i 

Old Colony Parkway. — Contract No. 78: Work of building reinforc 
concrete bridge at Patten's Cove, Dorchester, was awarded to the B^ 
State Dredging & Contracting Company, lowest bidders. Work was 
begun April 6, 1925, and completed August 26, 1925, at a total cost of 
$33,884.49. 

Contract No. 84: The plans for the crossing of Dorchester Bay with the 
Old Colony Parkway, provide for a bridge about 300 feet long with draw 
and the filling of the approaches from each shore. These approaches are 
about 1,000 feet long on each side and will require about 600,000 yards of 
filling material. Bids were received on June 4, 1925, and the contract 
awarded to the Bay State Dredging & Contracting Company, lowest bidders. 
Work was begun June 13, 1925, and is still in progress. 

Contract No. 85: At the northerly end of the parkway near its junction 
with Columbia Road, the driveway rises to meet the grade of Columbia 
Road and passes over Mt. Vernon Street. Bids for the work of building 
bridge over Mt. Vernon Street were received on August 27, 1925, and con- 
tract awarded to the lowest bidders, Coleman Brothers. Work was begun 
September 7, 1925, and is still in progress. 

Filling material has been offered from time to time at a very reasonable 
rate by contractors excavating for building operations in the city and 
vicinity, and has generally been accepted and used for building to subgrade 
the section from Columbia Road to Fox Point. This section is nearly com- 
pleted to subgrade. 

Contract No. 87 : A triangular parcel of land has been acquired from the 
Frost Coal Company to widen the approach to the Neponset Bridge at the 
junction of the Old Colony Parkway with Neponset Avenue. This area 
has been reconstructed and resurfaced with granite block pavement. Bids 
were received on September 3, 1925, and the contract awarded to the lowest 
bidder, John W. O'Connell. Work was begun September 15, 1925, and 
completed October 21, 1925, at a total cost of $6,523.78. 

The work of preparing plans for bridge for the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad over the Old Colony Parkway near the Pope's Hill 
Station is in progress. It is expected to begin the work early next spring. 

Quannapowitt Parkway. — Plans have been prepared for additional tak- 
ings for outlet for the parkway on to Main Street, so as to avoid interfer- 
ence with the operation of the ice houses and the expense of providing for 
same. The construction plans have been revised and it is expected to 
obtain bids soon for building the parkway. 

Revere Beach Parkway. — Contract No. 81 : The work of reconstructing 
the section from North Shore Road to the junction of Winthrop Avenue, 
with bituminous macadam, 1,250 feet in length and 36 feet in width, was 
done by the Rowe Contracting Company, bids having been received at the 
same time as those for Middlesex Fells Parkway. Work was begun May 21, 
1925, and completed June 15, 1925, at a total cost of $5,937.86. 

The section of the parkway from Main Street, Everett, westerly, 1,100 
feet in length and 28 feet in width, has been reconstructed with bituminous 
macadam. The work was done by the Rowe Contracting Company in 
connection with its work in Middlesex Fells Parkway, and was completed 
September 14, 1925, at a total cost of $3,821.44. 

The work of installing electric lighting system to replace the present obso- 
lete naphtha lamps has been in progress, work being done by the forces of 
the Revere Beach Division. The materials for this work have been pur- 
chased by the Department of Administration and Finance under specifica- 
tions prepared by this department. The work required 25,450 feet of single 
conductor armored parkway cable and 16,915 feet twin-conductor armored 
parkway cable which is to be laid in a trench instead of being pulled into 
conduits previously laid. This system of underground service is consid- 
erably cheaper than the conduit system and is much used outside of New 
England. There will be installed 190-600 candle-power incandescent 
lamps. These lamps are hung pendant from six-foot bracket arms, attached 
to steel poles twenty feet in height above the ground. The lamps are to 



P. D. 48 11 

be spaced from 150 to 200 feet apart, in some cases located all on one side 
of the parkway, other cases staggered on both sides of the parkway. 

The work is above three-quarters completed and it is expected that the 
lamps on this portion may be put in operation soon after the first of the 
year. The balance of the installation will be delayed until spring on account 
of the frost conditions. 

West Roxbury Parkway. — Surveys have been made and plans have been 
prepared for taking for the acquirement of land for an extension of the 
parkway from Weld Street, West Roxbury, to Newton Street, Brookline. 
The taking will be made soon and the work of construction of this section 
will be begun early next spring. 

Reservations 

Charles River Reservation, L. B. — Contract No. 76: Plans and specifi- 
cations have been prepared for the construction of reinforced concrete arch 
bridge and approaches over the Charles River Basin at Cambridge and River 
Streets, Boston and Cambridge. The bridge consists of three arch spans, 
two of 60 feet and one center span of 75 feet, and the total length, including 
wing walls of approaches, is 371 feet. The width is 60 feet and contains 
a roadway 40 feet in width and two sidewalks 10 feet each. Bids for the 
construction were received on March 21, 1925, and the work awarded to 
the lowest bidders, Luke S. White, Inc. Work was begun March 27, 1925, 
and is still in progress, although nearly completed. The remaining work, 
which is the surfacing of the roadway and walks, must be postponed until 
spring on account of the weather. 

The preliminary work for the construction of the proposed Cottage Farm 
Bridge, in accordance with the plans of the Planning Division provided by 
Chapter 416, Acts of 1924, has been in progress. Plans for the relocation 
of the Grand Junction tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad were not 
obtained from the Railroad Company until March 30, 1925, and as this 
was the first step, further progress could not be made until this relocation 
was determined. Four architects were invited to submit sketches in com- 
petition for the design of the proposed bridge. These studies were received 
on March 18, 1925. No choice was made by the Commission until October 
28, 1925, pending the receipt of approval and licenses of the various parties 
interested. Approval of the plans by the cities of Boston and Cambridge 
was received in February and March, 1925. Approval of the Public Works 
Department of the Commonwealth was requested, but it was determined 
by the Attorney General that their approval was not necessary. The 
approval of the War Department was received on September 18, 1925. 
The sketch for architectural design submitted by Desmond & Lord was 
selected by the Commission and approved on October 28, 1925. The work 
of preparing the construction plans and specifications in accordance with 
architect's sketches is now in progress. 

Proposal has been made by private parties to give to the Commonwealth 
through the Trustees of Harvard College, sufficient funds for the construc- 
tion of a memorial bridge over the Charles River Basin about "opposite 
DeWolfe Street, Cambridge, to the side of the new Harvard Graduate 
School of Business Administration, now in process of construction. This 
bridge is to be for pedestrian traffic only. The deed of gift is being prepared. 
The architect's sketches for the design have been prepared by McKim, 
Mead & White and submitted to the Commission for its approval. 

Charles River Reservation, U. D. — Contract No. 74: The work under 
contract with V. James Grande, awarded on November 6, 1924, for construc- 
tion of reinforced concrete bridge and approaches over the Charles River 
at Arsenal Street, was begun on January 30, 1925, and completed December 
17, 1925. The bridge consists of two reinforced concrete arch spans, each 
70 feet. The total length of the bridge is 292 feet, and width 60 feet. The 
roadway is 40 feet in width and two sidewalks each 10 feet in width. There 
are two street railway car tracks over the bridge. During the construction 
of the bridge a temporary foot bridge was provided for pedestrian traffic 



12 P. D. 48 

and all vehicular traffic was diverted. The new bridge was opened to 
all traffic on November 14, 1925. The total cost of the work has been 
$172,787.12. 

Contract No. 77: The stable building at Speedway Headquarters, Brighton, 
was no longer needed for use as a stable, as motor vehicles had been 
substituted for horses in this division. Larger quarters were necessary for 
the police and division forces, and plans have been prepared by William D. 
Austin, architect, for conversion of the stable into a police station. Bids 
were received on February 5, 1925, for the work of alterations and contrac 
awarded to John P. Curley, lowest bidder. Work was begun February 13, 
1925, and completed July 22, 1925, at a total cost of $16,427.40. Building 
has since been occupied by the police force of the division. 

Chapter 14, Resolves of 1925, required the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission to make investigations and prepare estimates for establishment of 
public reservation with boating and bathing facilities near Spring Street 
Bridge over the Charles River, Boston and Dedham. Surveys and plans 
have been made and estimates of cost submitted to the Commission for 
its report to the legislature. 

Middlesex Fells Reservation. — Chapter 324, Acts of 1925, authorized 
the Metropolitan District Commission to acquire certain land of the estate 
of Samuel C. Lawrence, late of the city of Medford, as an addition to the 
Middlesex Fells Reservation. Surveys and plans for taking of the land 
have been prepared and taking made. The area of land acquired is about 
285.5 acres and adjoins the southerly side of the reservation near Whitmore 
Brook entrance extending to Winthrop Street, Medford. 

Revere Beach Reservation. — Contract No. 73: The work of reconstruction 
with bituminous concrete surfacing of the roadway of Revere Beach Reser- 
vation, from Eliot Circle to Revere Street, Revere, which was begun Sep- 
tember 29, 1924, and suspended on December 4, 1924, on account of weather 
conditions, was again resumed in March and completed on June 5, 1925. 
The total cost of the work has been $77,843.43. 

The new electric lighting system authorized to be installed along the 
Revere Beach Reservation from Eliot Circle to Northern Circle, and the 
installation of which was carried on in connection with the reconstruction 
work, has been completed and the lights turned on for operation on June 
10, 1925. There are 108 magnetite arc lamps with ornamental poles and 
underground cables. The lamps are spaced 100 feet apart from Eliot Circle 
to Revere Street and 200 feet apart from Revere Street to Northern Circle. 
Those between Eliot Circle and Revere Street are on two separate circuits, 
so that one-half of them may be operated until midnight and the other 
half all night, and it is arranged so that alternate lamps may be cut out 
during the winter months, if it seems desirable to do so. The estimated 
cost of this installation was $50,000. The work has been completed for 
$34,190.39. 

Bridges and Locks 

All work of maintenance and repair of bridges and locks and operation of 
drawbridges has been done under the direction and supervision of this 
department. 

Extensive repairs have been made to the steel drawbridge at the Charles 
River Dam. The bridge has been in operation about fifteen years and 
portions of the structure had become corroded so as to weaken it. It was 
necessary to close one-half of the roadway at a time during the repairs. 
The work was done by the Atlantic Works of East Boston, and the total 
cost has been about $17,000. 

The wooden pile dolphins in the basin used for the protection of the lock 
and drawbridges, which have been damaged by traffic, were repaired at 
a total cost of $4,222.15. 

The work of breaking ice in the Charles River Basin for the season of 1924 
and 1925 has been done by a new police boat owned by the Department 
of Public Safety of the Commonwealth. The total cost of the work for 



Metropolitan Park System — December 1, 1925 











Reservations (AcheH. 


Parkways (Acres). 


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Parkways (Miles). 










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10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
10 

17 

18 
19 
20 
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23 
24 

25 
20 
27 

29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


Ciiiea. 

Boston . 

Cambridge 
Chelsea . 
Everett . 
Lynn 
Maiden . 
Mcdford 
Melrose . 
Newton . 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Waltham 
Woburn . 

Toirns. 
Arlington 
Belmont . 
Braintree 
Brookline 
Canton 
Coh asset 
Dedham . 
Dover 
Hingham 
Hull 

Milton . 
Nahant . 
Needhfini 
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Stoneliam 

Swampscott 

Wakefield 

Watertown 

Wellesley 

Weston . 

West wood 

Weymouth 

Winchester 

Winthrop 






6.05 


2,562.57 

67.84 
471.34 

1,547.08 
257.00 


59.53 
949.69 

177.54 

702.6 
261.93 


463.72 


42.77 


22.97 


4.24 
4.68 


168.69 

13S.86 

186.25 
38.68 

78-79 
66.07 
117.94 


42.32 
4.03 
7-83 


146.89 

264.26 
234.54 

270.33 


19.59 


64.29 


10.83 


32.91 


25.59 


785.35 
138.86 

19.59 
59.53 
992.01 
177.54 
190.49 
2,595.48 
04.29 
4.03 
81.45 

7.83 
67.84 
735.60 
234.54 

25.59 
1,818.01 

257.00 

702.6 

3.10 
22.97 
78.79 
70.65 
117.94 

6.57 

261.93 
16.83 


.27 
83.31 


22.04 
.60 


23.58 
44.56 

13.98 


21.16 
31.10 

8.10 
66.31 


265.34 
4.95 
17.40 

50.20 


72.37 


22.76 
51.16 


12.40 


.15 


101.14 


.32 


114.50 


50.72 
2.72 


13.47 


5.15 


S.61 


21.98 

15.10 


S6.38 

9.97 

2S.10 
20.43 


JS.10 
18.78 
11.16 
11.16 

.32 
(3. 53 
113.00 
7.57 
14.50 
B3.S6 
M1.07 
(8.90 
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5.50 
0.43 

9.19 
5.10 

114.47 
11.60 

.15 
6.47 

:o.so 

.13 


953.45 
237.6-1 
21.16 
31.16 
19.91 
83.11 
1,310.01 
185.11 
304.99 
2,699,34 
144.36 
32.93 
81.45 
22.64 

53.33 
35.99 

69.19 
735.00 

249.70 

25.59 
1,952.48 
81.66 
14.24 
257.00 

702.75 
3.10 
36.44 
78.79 
70.65 
117.94 
0.57 

312.73 
16.90 


.015 
2.250 


1.31 
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1.515 
2.850 

.740 


.814 
1.002 

.482 
2.295 


4.45 
.38 
1.40 

1.780 


1.510 


1.540 


.520 


.000 


4.320 


2.2!U 


1.20 


2.70 
.36 


.774 


.570 


.88 
.02 


.49 
.49 


1.563 

.303 

.848 
.473 


2.083 

.814 
1.662 

.12U 

7.782 
1.000 
1.200 
4.6S0 
3.745 
1.423 

1.310 

2.248 
.473 

.800 
.490 

3.790 

2.230 

.060 
.774 

1.850 
.020 


1 

3 
4 

6 

S 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 






6.05 


4,906.43 


2,151.29 


463.72 


58.33 


22.97 


23.06 


795.28 


54.18 


922.59 


22.69 


64.29 


10.83 


32.91 


25.59 


9,560.21 


83.58 


23.24 


S2.I2 


126.73 


337.S9 


72.37 


73.92 


12.40 


7.72 


101.14 


81.98 


1S3.09 


53.44 


13.47 


5.15 


S.74 


37.14 


144.88 


1,449.47 


11,015.81 


2.205 


1.38 


5.105 


5.253 


8.01 


1.510 


2.200 


.520 


1.120 


4.320 


2.231) 


2.00 


3.06 


.774 


.600 


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h 



P. D. 48 13 

last winter was $13,449.60. The boat began operations December 15, 
1924, and was released on March 14, 1925. 

The following is a record of the traffic through locks and drawbridges 
during the year: — 

Charles River Dam and Locks 



Number of openings, 5,098 
Number of vessels, 7,363 
Number of boats, 2,649 
Lumber (feet B. M.), 1,873,616 
Coal (tons), 183,276 
Oil (barrels), 709,100 



Marble (tons), 11 
Sand (tons), 415,460 
Gravel (tons), 169,745 
Rubble stone (tons), 30,895 
Granite (tons), 3,348 
Water (gallons), 21,000 
Miscellaneous (tons), 300 



Empty barrels, 28,512 
Piling (lineal feet), 10,825 

There were 3,832 drawbridge openings. 

The small boat lock was not used during the year. 



Number of openings, 362 
Number of boats, 459 



Cradock Bridge Lock 

Number of boats over roll way, 141 



Temporary Cottage Farm Bridge 

| Number of vessels, 10 

Maiden River Bridge 

| Number of vessels, 729 

Neponset Bridge 

| Number of vessels, 465 

Saugus River Bridge 

| Number of vessels, 659 

Wellington Bridge 

| Number of vessels, 171 

General 

The road repairs and maintenance have been done by the forces of the 
various divisions under the supervision and direction of the Engineering 
Department. 

All bridges under the care and control of the Commission have been 
inspected twice during the year and estimates of cost of repairs included 
in the budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. RABLIN, Chief Engineer and Director of Park Engineering. 



Number of openings, 6 
Number of openings, 432 
Number of openings, 314 
Number of openings, 441 
Number of openings, 137 



14 P. D. 48 

Table I. - - Data relating to Metropolitan Park System 
Areas of Reservations and Parkways 

Acres 

4,906.43 
6.05 



Reservations 

Blue Hills 
Bunker Hill 
Middlesex Fells 
Stony Brook 
Beaver Brook 
Hart's Hill 
Hemlock Gorge 
Charles River 
Mystic River 
Neponset River 
King's Beach and Lynn 
Revere Beach . 
Winthrop Shore 
Quincy Shore . 
Nantasket Beach 
Total 



Parkways : 

Hammond Pond 
Blue Hills 
Old Colony . 
Woburn 
Middlesex Fells 
Revere Beach . 
Mystic Valley 
Neponset River 
Fresh Pond 
Lynn Fells 
Furnace Brook 
Nahant Beach 
Lynnway 
Winthrop 
Dedham . 
Alewife Brook 
West Roxbury 
Quannapowitt 
Total 



Shore 



2,151.29 

463 . 72 

58.33 

22.97 

23.06 

795 . 28 

54.18 

922 . 59 

22.69 

64.29 

16.83 

32.91 

25.59 



183.69 
83.58 
53.44 
23.24 
82.12 

126.73 

337 . 89 

73.92 

12.40 

7.72 

101.14 

81.98 

5.15 

8.61 

37.14 

144 . 88 
72.37 
13.47 



9,566.21 



Grand total, reservations and parkways 



1,449.47 
11,015.68 



Reservations : 

Charles River 
Lynn Shore 
Quincy Shore 
Revere Beach 
Winthrop Shore 

Parkways : 

Alewife Brook 
Blue HiUs . 
Cambridge . 
Dedham 
Fresh Pond . 
Furnace Brook 



Lengths of Formal Roads Constructed 

Double Single 

Roadways Roadways 

Miles Miles 



5.28 





1.12 




2.24 




2.70 




1.07 




.70 


46 


1.61 


37 


3.19 




.89 




.50 




4.32 



12.41 



P. D. 48 



15 



Lynn Fells . 
Lynnway 
Middlesex Fells 
Mystic Valley 
Nahant Beach 
Neponset River 
Old Colony . 
Revere Beach 
West Roxbury 
Winthrop 
Woburn 



*Equivalent in miles of single roadway 



Double 


Single 


Roadways 


Roadways 


Miles 


Miles 


— 


1.05 


— 


.68 


4.10 


1.77 


— 


6.17 


— 


.50 


— 


.76 


— 


1.51 


1.45 


3.73 



1.75 



1 

1 



09 

38 



7.38' 



31.60 
14.76 



Highways transferred by or taken from cities and towns: 

Alewife Brook Parkway . 

Blue Hills Reservation 

Charles River Reservation 

Middlesex Fells Reservation . 

Nantasket Beach Reservation 



Miles 
.44 

1.23 
.39 

6.63 
.71 



9.40 



Length of automobile roads in reservations: 

Blue Hills 5.35 

Charles River . 2.80 

Middlesex Fells 4 . 06 

Stony Brook 3 . 25 

15.46 

Grand total 83.63 

All above roads open to automobile traffic. 

Length of Carriage Roads and Bridle Paths in Reservations Miles 

Blue Hills Reservation 25.58 

Middlesex Fells Reservation 14 . 55 

Stony Brook Reservation 1 . 60 

Beaver Brook Reservation .22 

Charles River Reservation .89 

Total 42.84 

Iyights in Parkways and Reservations Lights 

Alewife Brook Parkway (arc lights) 10 

Blue Hills Parkway (Welsbach gas) 80 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division, Soldiers' Field Road, 
Arsenal Road and North Beach Street, Arsenal Street Bridge 

(electric) 20 

Charles River Reservation, Boston Embankment (electric) . . 106 

Cambridge Parkway (electric) 202 

Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin, Dam and Lock (arc) . 16 

Harvard Bridge (electric) 30 

Western Avenue Bridge (electric) 14 

Temporary Cottage Farm Bridge (electric) 10 

Fresh Pond Parkway (electric) 15 

Furnace Brook Parkway (Welsbach gas) 79 

Lynn Fells Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 17 

Lynn Shore Reservation (electric) 28 

Lynnway (electric) 10 

Middlesex Fells Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 258 

Middlesex Fells Parkway (electric) 2 



16 



Middlesex Fells Reservation ( Welsbach naphtha) 

Middlesex Fells Reservation (electric) 

Mystic Valley Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 

Nahant Beach Parkway (electric) 

Nantasket Beach Reservation (electric) 

Old Colony Parkway (electric) 

Quincy Shore Reservation (Welsbach gas) 

Revere Beach Parkway (Welsbach gas) 

Revere Beach Parkway (electric) 

Revere Beach Reservation (electric) 

Winthrop Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 

Winthrop Parkway (electric) 

Winthrop Shore Reservation (electric) 



Total 



Miles of Seashore 



Lynn Shore 
Nahant Beach . 
Revere Beach . 
Winthrop Shore 
Nantasket Beach 
Quincy Shore . 

Total .... 

Lengths of Sea Walls 

Lynn Shore 

Revere Beach at Northern Circle 

Revere Beach at Eliot Circle 

Revere Beach, shore protection, bath-house shelter at Revere 

Street shelter 

Revere Beach, shore protection, south of Northern Circle . , . 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Great Head 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to G rover's Cliff 

Quincy Shore Reservation, southerly end 

Nantasket Beach Reservation . . 

Winthrop Parkway, near Leverett Avenue, Revere and Winthrop 

Broad Sound Avenue to Sewall Avenue 



P. D. 48 
Lights 
29 
55 
60 
T 
20 2 
46 
78 
154 
10 
1083 
6 
16 
7 

1,502 

Miles 
1.50 
3.92 
2.74 
1.71 
1.02 
2.19 

13.08 

Miles 

1.30 

.08 

.15 

.29 
.28 
1.04 
.23 
.15 
.50 

.52 



Total 4.54 

Miles of River Bank Miles 

Charles River 32 . 61 

Mystic River 8.16 

Neponset River . . 15.86 

Alewif e Brook 4 . 50 

Total 61.13 

Bridges 

Reinforced concrete bridges 16 

Steel bridges 10 

Wooden bridges 8 4 

Drawbridges 6 

Footbridges 12 

Total 52 

1 Five additional lights, June 1 to December 1. 

2 Five additional lights in summer. 

3 Thirty-three electric, all night, May 1 to October 31. Thirty-three electric, to midnight, June 1 to 
September 30. Six all night, May 1 to September 30. 

* One-half of Wellington bridge rebuilt with concrete girders. 



P. D. 48 

Culverts 

Reinforced concrete and other masonry culverts .... 

Dams 

Beaver Brook Reservation, small wooden dams .... 
Charles River Reservation, wooden dam at Waltham, 220 feet in 

length .... 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 1,200 

feet in length 

Charles River Reservation, small stone dam in branch below Wash- 
ington Street, Newton Lower Falls 

Charles River Reservation, reinforced concrete dam at Washington 

Street, Newton Lower Falls, 175 feet in length .... 
Furnace Brook Parkway, reinforced concrete dam upstream from 

Black's Creek Bridge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small stone masonry dam with stop 

planks, in gorge 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small reinforced concrete dam on East 

Branch of river, Newton Upper Falls 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, reinforced concrete dam in Charles 

River at Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, 90 feet in length . 
Mystic River Reservation, reinforced concrete tidal dam at Cradock 

bridge, 100 feet in length; weirs, 400 feet in length 

J. OLcxl ............. 



17 
41 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



11 



Lock Gates, Sluice Gates and Tide Gates 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 6 lock 

gates, 13 sluice gates, 43 tide gates. 
Mystic River Reservation, Cradock bridge tidal dam, 2 lock gates, 

4 sluice gates, 8 tide gates. 
Quincy Shore Reservation, 8 tide gates. 
Revere Beach Parkway, 1 tide gate. 



Blue Hills Division . 
Middlesex Fells Division 
Nantasket Beach Division 
Charles River Reservation 
Fresh Pond Parkway 



Police Signal System 



Total 



Miles 
303^ 

10 

H 

615* 



Revere Beach Division police signal system, serving 11 miles of park- 
ways and reservations, and Middlesex Fells Division, serving 13^ miles of 
parkway, on wires leased from the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. 



18 P. D. 48 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF WATER DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir: — I respectfully submit the following report of the construction and 
maintenance operations of the Water Division for the calendar year 1925. 

ORGANIZATION 

Although the number of supervising, clerical and engineering employees 
was 53 at the beginning and also at the end of the year, there were many 
changes in the engineering force during the year. A labor force including 289 
employees at the beginning and 292 at the end of the year was engaged in 
maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, hydro- 
electric and pumping stations and in doing miscellaneous construction work. 
The average number of employees of all classes for the entire year was 364. 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT AND WORKS 

Under an agreement dated May 21, 1925 the town of Brookline was ad- 
mitted to the Metropolitan Water District as of January 1, 1925. 

The Water District now includes 20 municipalities with an area of about 
174 square miles and population as of July 1, 1925, of 1,398,720. The water 
works lands include an area of about 19,000 acres, of which about 2,000 acres 
have been planted with pine trees. The works include 9 storage reservoirs 
with 200 square miles of tributary watershed, a total storage capacity of 80 
billion gallons and water surface of 8,600 acres; 60 miles of aqueducts; 2 
hydroelectric power stations of a capacity of 7,000 horse power; 16 miles of 
high-tension power transmission line ; 5 distribution pumping stations with a 
combined equipment of 6,560 horse power and pumping capacity of 280 
million gallons a day; 12 distribution reservoirs with a capacity of 2% 
billion gallons, and 143.42 miles of distribution mains. The consumption 
of water from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year by the 18 
municipalities regularly supplied was 46,847,678,000 gallons, equivalent to 
an average daily consumption of 128,349,800 gallons or 98.5 gallons per capita 
for a population of 1,303,020 in the district supplied. 

CONSTRUCTION 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service 

At the beginning of the year the work of installing additional pumping 
equipment at the Spot Pond Station in Stoneham had been nearly com- 
pleted. The erection of the new cross-compound pumping engine of a 
capacity of 20 million gallons a day was completed so that the engine was 
first operated on January 8. While adjusting the engine for the acceptance 
duty trial the steam valves were found to be defective and considerable 
delay was experienced in replacing them and putting the engine in acceptable 
condition for the duty trial, which had not been made at the close of the year. 
The steel framework and cast-iron plates for the floor around the engine have 
been made and are at the pumping station, but will not be erected until the 
duty trial is made. 

The expenditures for the new equipment amount to $21,941.72 during the 
year, making a total of $107,199.73 for this work, exclusive of $20,700 to be 
retained under the contract with the Worthington Pump and Machinery 
Corporation until the duty trial of the engine is satisfactorily completed, the 
builder having guaranteed an efficiency of 142 million foot pounds of work 
per 1,000 pounds of steam used by the engine. 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

The work of furnishing and laying lock-bar steel pipes 60 inches in diame- 
ter in Waltham, under contract with the C. & R. Construction Company, 
which was in progress at the beginning of the year, was suspended January 17 



P. D. 48 19 

for the winter and was resumed March 11. Pipe laying was completed 
June 27 and the resurfacing of the streets and the entire work under the 
contract was completed October 10. 

The work of furnishing and laying lock-bar steel pipes 56 inches in diame- 
ter in Belmont and Arlington, which was in progress at the beginning of the 
year under contract with the T. A. Gillespie Company, was suspended 
January 24 for the winter. Work of distributing pipes along the line was 
resumed February 23, pipe laying was resumed in March and completed 
August 15. The work of resurfacing the streets in Arlington was begun 
September 8 and was completed October 17. In consideration of the pay- 
ment of $12,000 by the Commonwealth to the town of Belmont the town 
assumed all liability for resurfacing its streets where disturbed by the laying 
of the water main. 

May 26 a contract was made with the C. & R. Construction Company for 
furnishing and laying riveted steel pipe 60 inches in diameter for Section 12, 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains and a part of Section 51 of the Low Service 
Pipe Lines in Arlington and Somerville. This line extends easterly from 
Medford Street, Arlington, in Broadway, Palmer, Hamlet and Coral streets 
and the Mystic Valley Parkway, crossing under Alewife Brook and through 
Metropolitan Water Works land to Boston Avenue in Somerville. The work 
was begun July 6 at Alewife Brook, but on account of delay in making the 
pipes the work did not progress at the rate specified in the contract and was 
suspended September 1. No pipes were received until September 8; deliv- 
eries were slow for some time thereafter and as a result at the close of the 
year about 680 linear feet of pipe line had not been laid and about 2,000 feet 
of trench in which pipes had been laid had not been backfilled. 

The total expenditure for the new Weston Aqueduct Supply Main is 
$1,901,462.13 of which $1,073,314.32 was expended during the past year, 
and there are reserves held under current contracts amounting to $43,382.70. 

During the year easements for laying and maintaining the Weston Aque- 
duct Supply Mains were acquired in 0.554 of an acre of land in Arlington. 

Low Service Pipe Lines 

May 26 a contract was made with George M. Bryne for constructing a Low 
Service Pipe Line 48 inches in diameter and 4,400 feet in length in Boston 
Avenue in Somerville and Medford to connect the new Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Main with the existing low-service main in College Avenue. For 
this line, which is designated Section 51 of the Distribution System, cast-iron 
pipe was used, of which the contractor furnished 3,000 linear feet and the 
remainder was furnished from stock on hand in our pipe yards. The work 
was begun July 21 ; pipe laying was completed November 28, and the entire 
work was completed at the close of the year. 

The total expenditure for this pipe line is $161,469.12, all of which was 
expended during the year, and there are reserves held under current contracts 
amounting to $10,475.76. 

Northern High Service Pipe Lines 

July 30 a contract was made with Cenedella & Company for furnishing 
and laying a line of riveted steel pipes 38 inches in diameter southerly from 
the Fells Reservoir in Stoneham through the Middlesex Fells Reservation in 
Melrose, and in Fellsway East, Amerige Field and Highland Avenue to Elm 
Street in Maiden, a distance of 7,300 feet. This line reinforces the existing 
line of 36-inch diameter cast-iron pipe. The work was begun August 3, and 
continued to the end of the year. During this time 1 ,885 linear feet of pipe 
was laid and 1,200 cubic yards of rock was excavated. The total expendi- 
ture for the pipe line is $87,187.10 and reserves held under current contracts 
amount to $10,331.47. 



20 P. D. 48 

Southern High Service Pipe Line 

Some preliminary work has been done for the proposed Southern High 
Service Pipe Line from Chestnut Hill Pumping Station to the Arborway 
near Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, known as Section 52 of the Distribution 
System. 

The expenditures for this work amount to $293.10. 

Improvement of Service in Belmont and Watertown 

For the improvement of the service in Belmont and Watertown connections 
were made between the new Weston Aqueduct Supply Main and the Belmont 
pipes in Pleasant Street, and an area of approximately 775 acres below ele- 
vation 100 has been supplied from the Weston Aqueduct since September 23. 

Plans have also been made to supply an area of about 1 ,325 acres in Water- 
town below elevation 80 by a 30-inch branch line connecting with the new 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Main at Newton and Central Streets in Waltham. 
A connection has also been made between the Southern High Service Main 
and the city of Newton force main in Ward Street so that the pressure in the 
Meeting House Hill and Payson Park districts in Watertown and Belmont 
can be increased about 60 feet to improve the service in these districts. 

Meters and Connections 

During the past year $8,770.27 was expended for meters and connections, 
required on account of the construction of the new pipe lines. 

Improving Wachusett Watershed 

During the year $2,994.34 has been expended for acquiring real estate in 
the Wachusett watershed, including 0.58 acre in Sterling and 11.4 acres in 
Holden. 

Authorized Extension of Works 

The completion of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, the construction 
of the 48-inch low-service main in Medford, northern high-service main in 
Maiden and the new southern high-service main for Boston, improvement of 
service in Watertown and Belmont, the installation of additional meters and 
connections and the purchase of land for the protection of the water supply 
were authorized by chapter 302 of the Acts of 1925, which provides for a 
total expenditure of $1,130,000 during the years 1925, 1926 and 1927, 
including the sum of $400,000 received from the town of Brookline for admis- 
sion to the Water District. 

MAINTENANCE 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

The precipitation on the watersheds varied more or less from normal, 
according to the locality ; no marked variation common to all the watersheds 
is noted except the low precipitation in February and August and the high 
precipitation in March. The total precipitation for the year is 43.37 inches 
or 1.87 inches below the average on the Wachusett watershed; 45.64 inches 
or 1.11 inches above the average on the Sudbury watershed, and 43.99 inches 
or 1.13 inches below the average on the Cochituate watershed. 

The average yields of the watersheds for the year in gallons per day per 
square mile were 854,000 or about 22 per cent below the average for the past 
29 years on the Wachusett watershed, 797,000 or 18 per cent below the aver- 
age for the past 51 years on the Sudbury watershed, and 772,000 or 17 per 
cent below the average for the past 63 years on the Cochituate watershed. 

The city of Worcester did not discharge any water into the Wachusett 
Reservoir watershed from the area diverted in 1911 that was formerly tribu- 
tary to the reservoir. 



P. D. 48 



21 



Storage Reservoirs 



The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, 
the elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water stored in each 
reservoir at the beginning and at the end of the year are shown by the follow- 
ing table: — 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 
Water 


Capacity 
(Gallons) 


Jan. 1, 1925 


Jan. 1, 1926 


Storage Reservoirs 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Sur- 
face 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Cochituate Watershed: — 

Lake Cochituate 2 
Sudbury Watershed: — 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

Ashland Reservoir 

Hopkinton Reservoir . 

Whitehall Reservoir . 

Farm Pond .... 
Wachusett Watershed: — 

Wachusett Reservoir . 


144.36 

260.00 
169.32 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 
289,900,0003 
529,900,0003 
1,180,000,0003 
1,416,400,000 
1,520,900,000 
1,256,900,000 
167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 


143.49 

258.17 
167.65 
177.49 
184.00 
223.26 
302.93 
337.38 
158.16 

379.98 


1,891,100,000 

6,491,700,000 

214,000,000 

545,900,000 

979,400,000 

1,310,000,000 

1,392,400,000 

1,153,600,000 

109,600,000 

46,296,600,000 


142.75 

256.30 
167.79 
177.66 
185.23 
224.45 
304.13 
336.66 
159.55 

373.39 


1,718,200,000 

5,730,600,000 

220,000,000 

553,300,000 

1,077,500,000 

1,374,600,000 

1,466,500,000 

1,015,200,000 

183,700,000 

39,594,200,000 


Totals . . . . 


- 


80,680,100,000 


- 


60,384,300,000 


- 


52,933,800,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 

3 To top of flashboards. 

The table shows the total storage which could be drained from the reservoirs. 
Special provisions would be necessary, however, to draw about 10,000,000,000 
gallons of this storage for consumption, as it is below the outlet channels 
which can be conveniently used for regular service. 

Wachusett Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year there was 46 billion gallons of water in the 
Wachusett Reservoir, which had been drawn down 15 feet below elevation 
395, the designed high-water line. By -February 10 the water had been 
drawn down to elevation 375.89, which was the lowest stage reached before 
the reservoir began to fill from the spring rains. There was then 42 billion 
gallons of water stored in the reservoir. From February 10 to April 27 there 
was a continuous gain in storage, the water rising to elevation 386.19 and the 
quantity in storage increasing to 53^ billion gallons. This was the maxi- 
mum for the year and also the smallest maximum for any year since the reser- 
voir first filled in 1908. From April 27 to November 12 the water was drawn 
down at the rate of about 23^ feet a month, to elevation 369.60 or 25.4 feet 
below the normal full reservoir level, and the quantity of water in storage 
was reduced to 36 billion gallons. This was the lowest stage to which the 
reservoir had been drawn since it first filled in 1908. Rains during the latter 
part of November and in December raised the water to elevation 373.39 on 
January 1, 1926 and increased the quantity of water stored in the reservoir to 
39.6 billion gallons. 

In compliance with the requirements of section 14 of Chapter 92 of the 
General Laws 627,200,000 gallons of water was discharged into the Nashua 
River below the Wachusett Dam during the year. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 348 of the Acts of 1923, the town of 
Clinton pumped 162,400,000 gallons of water from the reservoir into the 
town's distribution system. This is equivalent to an average draft of 445,000 
gallons a day for the entire year. Pumping was continuous from January 1 
to February 12, inclusive, and from April 29 to November 24, inclusive, 
Sundays and holidays excepted. 

At the beginning of the year the city of Worcester was pumping water 
from the reservoir into high-service mains at its emergency pumping 



22 P. D. 48 

station on the shore of the reservoir at South Bay in Boylston, under an 
extension of the authority granted October 18, 1923 and this pumping was 
continued through February 23. Under authority granted June 19 pump- 
ing was resumed on July 16 and continued daily through December 12 with 
the exception of about two weeks early in November, during which time the 
pumping plant and intake were extended to permit of pumping from the 
lower stage reached by the water in the reservoir. The total amount of 
water pumped from the reservoir during these two periods was 942,300,000 
gallons, which is equivalent to an average draft of 2,582,000 gallons a day 
for the entire year. 

The usual work of cutting and burning brush and weeds growing along 
about 38 miles of the margins of the reservoir, the sides of adjacent highways 
and along brooks and rivers which flow directly into the reservoir has been 
done at a cost of $3,413.13. 

Wire fences enclosing water works land were erected for a distance of 4.37 
miles along property lines and highways in Boylston, West Boylston, Sterling 
and Clinton at a cost of about $1,110 per mile exclusive of posts, which were 
obtained from the water works lands. 

The riprap facing on the easterly portion of the North Dike, Clinton, for a 
length of about 130 linear feet, where originally built of stones too light to 
withstand the heavy wave action, has been reinforced with about 225 cubic 
yards of large rocks secured from the shore of the reservoir just westerly from 
the dam, at a cost of $1,661.43 or about $7.50 per cubic yard. 

About 690 acres of the bottom of the reservoir above elevation 380, which 
had been exposed for two successive seasons and upon which there was a 
considerable growth of weeds and water grass, were cleaned by mowing, 
raking and burning at a cost of $4,924.47 or about $7.00 per acre. Of this 
area about 105 acres, where the growth was particularly rank and heavy, 
were harrowed with spring-tooth harrows before raking. 

About 50 linear feet of the shore line of the reservoir where it joins the 
highway embankment around South Bay, Boylston, have been faced with 
about 90 square yards of slope paving 15 inches deep at a cost of $193.31. 

A wooden frame boat-house 14 feet wide by 34 feet long by 12 feet high, 
with concrete foundations 15 feet deep, has been constructed on the shore of 
the reservoir at Andrews harbor, Boylston, for the housing of the motor 
patrol boat, at a cost of $3,081.21. A slip excavated in the sloping shore of 
the cove provides a means of access to the boat-house within a working range 
of the upper ten feet of the reservoir. 

The work of cleaning, repairing and painting the cast-iron sluice gates and 
fittings in the four wells, each about 68 feet deep below the gate chamber, 
and the overhauling and repairing of the wooden stop planks, spacers and 
screens used in this chamber in connection with the control, regulation and 
screening of the water as it is drawn from the reservoir, was in progress at 
the close of the year. About one-half of the work has been done. The lower 
23^-foot by 6-foot sluice gate in well No. 1 was found to be cracked trans- 
versely in two places and was repaired by inserting four tie-rods, each 1| 
inches in diameter, lengthwise of the gate, thereby securely holding it 
together. The rest of the ironwork in the two wells already cleaned was 
found to be in very good condition. The hard pine wood in the stop-planks, 
spacers, screens and ladders, where alternately submerged in the water and 
exposed to the air, was so far deteriorated as to need replacing in about 25 
per cent of the apparatus. 

The structures at the Wachusett Dam, Clinton and Oakdale storage yards 
and the eight department houses in the Wachusett Section have been kept 
in repair. The buildings at the Kendall place, Boylston, the March place, 
Oakdale, and the Howe place, Sterling, were painted one coat on the outside 
and electric wires and lighting fixtures were installed in the Kendall house. 
A parcel of land on Boylston Street, Clinton, containing 0.17 of an acre, lying 
outside the limits of the watershed, was sold to Thomas Madigan. 

Standing grass on about 270 acres of water works lands was sold, largely at 
auction, for the sum of $782. 



P. D. 48 23 

Sudbury Reservoir 

The water in Sudbury Reservoir was kept on an average a little more than 
one foot below the crest of the overflow at the dam during the year, and the 
flash boards were not placed on the overflow at any time, in order to permit 
pointing the stone masonry on the crest and the face of the overflow. 

With the exception of 15,800,000 gallons of water which passed over the 
overflow on February 12 and 13, due to a sudden yield of the watershed, all 
water drawn from the reservoir was used in generating electric energy at the 
Sudbury power station. 

The usual care has been given to the reservoir margins and the walks, 
drives and grounds below the dam. 

The upstairs tenement of the department house at the dam has been 
remodelled, new plumbing installed and the interior painted and papered. 

The life buoys and holders around the reservoir, the row-boat used on the 
reservoir, the iron fences and manhole covers below the dam and the floor 
plates and ironwork in the head-house of the Weston Aqueduct have been 
painted. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

All water supplied to the Metropolitan Water District has been drawn 
from Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3. The water in 
these reservoirs has been maintained at the desired elevation by drawing 
water from the Wachusett Reservoir as needed. The water in Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3 reached its highest elevation in February and, with the 
exception of 181,500,000 gallons wasted into Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 
due to a sudden yield from the watershed, on February 12, 13 and 14, all 
water drawn from the reservoir was used to supply the Metropolitan Water 
District and the town of Framingham. Flashboards were kept on the over- 
flow of the dam all the year. 

The ironwork inside the gate-house, the shed below the dam and the boat- 
house were painted. The shores of the reservoir, the embankments and the 
grounds and shrubbery at the dam and other structures were cared for as 
usual. The lanes along property lines were kept clear of brush and sprouts 
and 2,224 linear feet of new wire fence was built, 561 feet of which was to 
replace old broken down fences. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashtand, Hopkinton and Whitehall 

Reservoirs. 

No water was drawn for consumption from the 47 square miles of the South 
Sudbury watershed tributary to Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, 
Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs, as the water is usually highly 
colored and not suitable for use without purification. Not less than 1,500,000 
gallons of water a day has been wasted from Framingham Reservoir No. 1 
into the Sudbury River below Dam No. 1, as required by Acts of 1872, 
chapter 177. 

The ironwork in the gate-houses at Dams Nos. 1 and 2 and at the Ashland 
Dam was painted and 750 feet of new wire fence was erected on property 
lines around Framingham Reservoir No. 1. 

The department house at Salem End Road in Framingham was painted 
inside and most of the rooms were papered. 

In October and November the water in Framingham Reservoir No. 1 
was lowered as much as possible, in order to permit inspection of the bed of 
the reservoir, and samples of mud and earth were obtained for analysis. The 
depth of mud was measured and the condition of the 48-inch pipe line noted, 
and test pits were dug to determine the quality and probable quantity of 
gravel that might be obtained there. The reservoir was allowed to fill again 
in December. 

The Fountain Street bridge across part of Reservoir No. 2, which was built 
by the city of Boston and is maintained by this Commission, was found to be 
in an unsafe condition early in the year, and with the approval of the Select- 
men of Framingham, was closed to travel while repairs were made. The 



24 P. D. 48 

woodwork was all removed, heavier angle iron supports for the floor beams 
were riveted to the steel girders, new and heavier floor beams were erected 
and the ironwork was painted. 

At Ashland Reservoir 270 feet of 2-rail plank fence was built across the 
channel below the dam and the brush and dead and broken trees on the east 
shore were cleared for a distance of about 1,400 feet above the dam. 

At Hopkinton Reservoir the attendant's house was painted and at White- 
hall Reservoir the grounds around the new gate-house were graded and 
seeded. 

Between September 24 and October 1 the town of Hopkinton pumped 
638,000 gallons of water direct from the reservoir to supplement its regular 
supply. 

Farm Pond 

No water was taken by the town of Framingham from Farm Pond during 
the year. _ Under rights reserved by legislation, the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road took approximately 72,400,000 gallons of water and the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad took about 64,200,000 gallons of water from 
the pond for the use of locomotives. 

Lake Cochituate 

The elevation of water in Lake Cochituate was maintained between one 
and two feet below high-water mark most of the year. During July, August 
and September 710,300,000 gallons of water were taken from the lake for 
the supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

About 1,200 feet of 2-rail plank fence was built along West Pond Street 
and about 600 feet of wire fence adjoining Lake View Cemetery in Cochituate. 
The ironwork in the gate-house was painted and the grounds cleaned. Brush 
and sprouts were cut along property lines and the catch basins and surface 
drains were cleaned. 

Aqueducts 

Wachusett Aqueduct 

Water was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett 
Aqueduct on 270 days. The total time that the aqueduct was in use is 
equivalent to 121 days, 9 hours and 55 minutes. The total quantity of 
water discharged was 38,399,500,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 
105,204,000 gallons per day for the entire year. All of the water, with the 
exception of 24,500,000 gallons used for filling the open channel after repairs, 
was used to generate electric energy at the power station before being dis- 
charged into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 70,128,000 gallons of water 
from the aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year, or an average 
of 192,000 gallons per day. 

In constructing the open channel portion of the aqueduct in 1896 ten open 
watering places were provided for cattle feeding in adjacent pastures. 
These watering places proved to be unsatisfactory and in 1922, as an experi- 
ment, two of them were reconstructed to provide for their rapid filling each 
morning with fresh water from the channel and the filtering of the contami- 
nated water before returning to the channel at the close of the day. As 
these proved satisfactory, the remaining eight watering places were rebuilt 
this year. In connection with this work 16 wooden bridges were replaced 
with concrete or iron pipe culverts and three other wooden bridges were 
abandoned, thereby eliminating all of the wooden bridges along the open 
channel portion of the aqueduct. Old stone walls were removed and used 
for filling at the culverts and in facing the shore of the channel for a length of 
1,100 feet, and in place of the walls, 1,555 linear feet of wire fencing was 
erected around the watering places and along a stretch of 990 feet of the 
aqueduct land. 

Brush, grass and weeds were mowed and disposed of for a distance of 10 
miles along the aqueduct, at a cost of about $240 per mile. 



P. D. 48 25 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in continuous service during the year except 
for 8 hours on July 6 and §y 2 hours on November 27, and 20,481,300,000 
gallons of water was drawn through the aqueduct from Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3 during the year, of which 504,000,000 gallons was pumped by the 
town of Framingham and 4,100,000 gallons was delivered to Lake Cochituate. 
The remainder, amounting to 19,973,200,000 gallons was delivered to Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir, an average of 54,721,096 gallons per day. 

The ironwork in the pipe chambers, the fences at Waban and Echo bridges 
and all the manhole covers along the aqueduct were painted and a new fence 
was built at Hollis Street, Framingham. 

Weston Aqueduct 

The Weston Aqueduct is not usually in service on Sundays and holidays, 
but this year as many of the holidays came at the end of the week, it was 
necessary to operate the aqueduct several times on such days. Water was 
drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir into the aqueduct on 319 days, the total 
time that the aqueduct was in service being 219 days, 12 hours and 4 minutes, 
and the total quantity of water drawn was 24,577,000,000 gallons, or an 
average of 67,334,247 gallons per day. 

The iron and wood work in the head-house, gaging and siphon chambers 
and the manhole covers along the aqueduct were painted. Culverts were 
cleaned and brush and weeds cut and burned. At Nobscot the house was 
painted, new wire fence 758 feet in length was built and 279 old fence posts 
were replaced with new ones. 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in service from July 18 to August 21 and 
from September 21 to October 2, and 710,300,000 gallons of water were 
delivered through it to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, or an average of 1,946,027 
gallons per day. 

On October 9 the aqueduct was drained and 9,400,000 gallons of water 
was wasted into the Charles River. An inspection was then made of the 
entire length of the aqueduct, points of leakage into the aqueduct were noted 
and samples taken of the water entering the aqueduct and biological analyses 
made of the quality of the water. Many small roots, chiefly of elm and willow 
trees, were removed from the aqueduct and many of the leaks were stopped 
by cement mortar and wooden wedges. 

The ironwork in the pipe chambers, waste-weirs and the manhole covers 
along the aqueduct were painted, and grass and weeds on both sides of the 
aqueduct were cut and burned. 

Protection of Water Supply 

A sanitary inspector, two watershed inspectors and three watchmen were 
employed throughout the year to inspect the condition of premises on the 
watersheds and ice cutting operations and to prevent pollution of the water 
in the reservoirs, and in the obtaining of information for a sanitary census 
which is taken every five years. 

The following tables contain a summary of the sanitary inspections and of 
the sanitary census by districts for 1925; also a summary of the sanitary 
census of 1920 for each watershed for comparison. 



26 



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Totals for 1920 . 



P. D. 48 



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30 t P. D. 48 

Filters have been operated at Sterling, Sterling Junction, West Boylston, 
Marlborough and Natick throughout the year to prevent pollution of the' 
water supply at these places, and any large flows of surface water in excess of 
the capacity of the filters was sterilized with calcium hyperchlorite before it 
entered the reservoirs. 

The pumping station and filters at Pegan Brook, used for purifying the 
water of Pegan Brook in Natick before it enters Lake Cochituate, have been 
operated when necessary during the year. The pumping station was operated 
onl75 days and 259,863,000 gallons of surface water was pumped to the filter- 
beds, or an average of 711,953 gallons per day for the entire year. The cost 
of operating the station, including the care of the grounds and filter-beds, 
was $5,931.76, or at the rate of $22.83 per million gallons pumped and 
filtered. 

The usual work of cleaning out the ditches, culverts and watering places 
and mowing the weeds and brush for a distance of 10 to 20 feet on either side 
was done along 37 miles of ditches at a cost of $5,750. 

Along the drainage ditches 275 square yards of paving, 1,348 feet of bottom 
boards and 1,150 feet of corner pieces were relaid, 8 new bridges were built 
and 2 old bridges repaired. 

Two parcels of land, with cottages, containing 0.58 of an acre, on the west 
shore of Middle Waushacum Pond in Sterling, were purchased from Mary E. 
Lee and Anne J. Coughlin, and a parcel of land on River Street in Holden, 
containing 11.40 acres, was purchased from N. Marion Worcester. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 

The works for disposing of the sewage of the town of Clinton were operated 
on 365 days, as required by chapter 557 of the Acts of 1898. The sewage was 
pumped to the filter-beds and averaged 1,413,000 gallons per day. The cost 
of operating the pumping station was $2,660.65 or $0,103 per million foot 
gallons of sewage pumped, about 47 per cent of the cost being for labor. The 
cost of operating the filters was $9,844.71 or at the rate of $19,088 per million 
gallons of sewage disposed of. 

Forestry 

In the Wachusett Section 27,000 white, red, Scotch and Austrian pines 
2 to 4 years old and white spruce seedlings were planted on 23 acres of water 
works land along the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marl- 
borough and Southborough and on the margins of the Wachusett Reservoir 
in Boylston, West Boylston and Sterling. 

In the Sudbury Section 16,100 white pines and 3,400 spruces 3 to 4 years 
old were set out in new plantings and 3,300 pines and 4,000 spruces were used 
to replace trees that had failed in previous years. 

There are now about 45,000 plants in the Wachusett Section nursery, and 
about 15,000 in the Sudbury Section nursery. 

The marginal fire guards and forest roads from 15 to 45 feet in width were 
mowed for a length of 60 miles in the Wachusett Section and of 16 miles in 
the Sudbury Section. 

The usual work was done to protect the plantings from the pine tree weevil 
and trees on selected areas from insects. The total expenditure for forestry 
for the year is $29,000, of which $1,800 was expended for protecting the trees 
from insects. 

A parcel of water works land, containing about 25 acres, at the Clinton- 
Sterling town line was assigned to the Department of Conservation, Forestry 
Division, to be used by them as a nursery. 

The cutting of standing chestnut timber and intergrown white pine and 
hardwood trees on about 825 acres of Wachusett Reservoir land, which was 
begun by the Wilder, Walker & Davis Company of Sterling, December 20, 
1923, has been in progress throughout the year, and in accordance with the 
terms of the contract $9,650 has been paid by the Company to date. This 
work was nearly completed at the close of the year. 



P. D. 48 31 

Hydroelectric Service 

During the year 12,127,400 kilowatt hours of electric energy were delivered 
from the hydroelectric stations operated by water drawn from the Wachusett 
and Sudbury reservoirs. The total value of this energy at contract prices, 
including rentals of $139 for transmission line locations, is $69,436.26. The 
total expense charged to operation of both stations and transmission lines is 
$45,683.30, leaving a profit from the operation of the stations of $22,752.96, 
equivalent to $1,876 profit per thousand kilowatt hours. Of the total energy 
delivered from both stations this year 26,346 kilowatt hours of energy, for 
which $164.64 was received, were generated with water wasted from the 
reservoirs and not required for water supply. 

Wachusett Service 

Repairs have been made to two of the 48-inch hydraulic gates in the pen- 
stock lines at a cost of $1,074. The submerged centrifugal pump in the pump 
well has been overhauled and repaired. A 3-inch water service has been laid 
to the power station from the town of Clinton's water pipe in Boylston 
Street, a distance of 410 feet, at a cost of $412.04. The usual repairs to the 
generating apparatus and the transmission lines, rendered necessary by 
electrical storms, have been made as required. 

The Wachusett power station was operated on 269 days. The statistics 
for the year 1925 are as follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . . . 7,298,500 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) . . 178,193 

Available energy (kilowatt hours) .... 7,120,307 

Water used (gallons) 38,375,000,000 

Average head (feet) ....... 83 . 7 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 2.272 

Efficiency of station (per cent) . . . . . 72.31 

Credits : 

Energy sold New England Power Company 
and Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany, 6,931,309 kilowatt hours at 

$0.0053 $36,735.94 

Deduction of 2 per cent as provided 
in contract, 138,626 kilowatt hours 
at $0.0053 734.72 



$36,001.22 



Energy furnished Clinton Sewerage Pumping 

Station, 188,998 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 1,001.69 
Rental, transmission line location . . . 139.00 $37,141.91 



Charges : 

Superintendence ..... $1,217.36 
Labor, operating station . . . 11,147.44 

Repairs and supplies: 

Power station . . $1,543,861 + aaa Q « 

Transmission line . . 123.01 ^M*-*' 



$14,031.67 

Taxes 2,725.00 

Administration, general supervision, interest 

and sinking fund . . . . 9,232.17 25,988.84 



Profit ........ $11,153.07 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours $3.65 



32 P. D. 48 

Sudbury Service 

The Sudbury Power Station was in service on 319 days, 47 with three 
shifts, 267 with two shifts and 5 with one shift of 8 hours each. With the 
exception of 15,800,000 gallons of water wasted over the Sudbury Dam in 
February, all water drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir was used to generate 
electricity. 

Statistics for the year 1925 are as follows: — 
Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) . . . 5,017,480 



Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 

Available energy (kilowatt hours) . 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: 

Water used (gallons) .... 

Average head (feet) .... 

Weston Aqueduct service : 

Water used (gallons) .... 

Average head (feet) .... 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 
Efficiency of station (per cent) ..... 
Credits: 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston, 5,007,093 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 
Charges : 

Superintendence .... $1,269.48 

Labor, operating station . . 11,122.31 

Repairs and supplies . . . 524.27 



10,387 



5,007,093 

21,405,000,000 
64.80 

24,577,000,000 

37.67 

2.169 

69.1 



$31,294.35 



Taxes 

Administration, general 
and sinking fund 



supervision, interest 



$12,916 
1,785 



06 
60 



4,992 . 80 



19,694.46 

$11,599.89 
$3 . 933 



Profit ......... 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

The total pumpage at the five distribution pumping stations during 1925 
was 34,878,378,000 gallons; about 1.3 per cent more than in 1924. The cost 
of operating all of the pumping stations for the year 1925 was $204,458.23 
which is comparable with a cost of $197,576.19 in 1924. 

At the beginning of the year there were 1,100 net tons of bituminous coal 
and 550 net tons of anthracite screenings stored at the pumping stations. Dur- 
ing the year 9,438 net tons of bituminous coal and 2,756 net tons of anthra- 
cite screenings were received. At the close of the year 1,800 net tons of 
bituminous coal and 80 net tons of anthracite screenings were on hand at the 
pumping stations. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 miscellaneous repairs were made on all of 
the engines. The Corliss valves on the high pressure and intermediate 
pressure cylinders of engine No. 4 were cleaned and oiled, the jacket piping 
was rearranged and connected to the auxiliary heater of engine No. 16 and 
snifting valves were connected to the pump discharge air chamber to elimi- 
nate use of independent air pump. Most of the pumping at this station was 
done with the new engine, No. 16, installed in 1922. The low pressure cyl- 
inder exhaust valves were spot babbitted to keep them on the seats; steel 
wedges were installed in the high pressure and low pressure bearings in place 
of the cast-iron wedges furnished by the builder, and the main bearings, cross 
heads and connecting rod bearings were fitted with oil sight feed. As the 
Massey governor furnished with this engine had not operated satisfactorily 
the springs were replaced with lever arms and weights and the dash pot piping 
was rearranged, and since these changes were made the governor has operated 
in a satisfactory manner. All of the boilers and the economizers at this 



P. D.48 33 

station were inspected regularly, and heating surfaces were kept clean and 
external parts were carefully insulated. A new steel door was set in the 
chimney soot chamber. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 2 pump valves and springs were renewed in 
the main pumps of engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7, air pump valves were renewed 
and the condensers were washed out. Valve gear, dash pots and bearings of 
engine No. 12 were repaired and extension rods were carried up through the 
floor from the pump plunger chamber drain valves so that they can be opera- 
ted by the engineer from the engine room floor. A rustless steel bushing was 
fitted to the wedge of No. 8 hydraulic gate valve to hold the stem, which had 
pulled out, in position. Bearings, governors and oiling systems for both 
electric lighting dynamo engines were repaired and the exhaust from both 
engines was connected to the station heating system. The boilers and 
economizers at this station were inspected regularly and heating surfaces 
were kept clean. A few fire cracks were electrically welded in several of the 
boilers and 52 solid stay bolts in boilers Nos. 15 and 16 were replaced with 
flexible stay bolts. 

At Spot Pond Station minor repairs have been made on engines Nos. 8 and 
9. The new engine, No. 17, has been operated a large portion of the time 
since it was put into service on January 8 and the electric wiring and lighting 
fixtures have been installed thereon. The turbo electric lighting generator 
was moved from the boiler room to the engine room ; the independent boiler 
feed pump was overhauled and the boilers and economizer were inspected 
regularly and heating surfaces were kept clean. 

At Arlington Station the governor of engine No. 10 was fitted with new 
pins, spindle and drive shaft. The dynamo engine was repaired and the 
boilers have been inspected regularly and necessary repairs have been made. 
Since October 26, 1925, water has been supplied to this station from the new 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, reducing the lift about 30 feet. 

At Hyde Park Station the usual miscellaneous repairs have been made on 
engines and boilers. 

Chestnut Hill Shops. Further alterations have been made in the old 
stable at Chestnut Hill and the entire building is now used for blacksmith, 
carpenter and machine shops, which have been provided with steam heat, 
hot water and compressed air from Station No. 2 through an underground 
conduit. This is a very convenient arrangement as the shops are located 
midway between the pumping stations and include complete equipment for 
all classes of repair work, required by the Division. 

The station duties based on plunger displacement and with no allowance 
for steam used for heating and lighting have averaged as follows : — 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 1, 117,834,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of 
mixed coal averaging 14,050 British thermal units per pound. 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, 136,641,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of 
mixed coal averaging 14,000 British thermal units per pound. 

Spot Pond Station, 107,434,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal 
averaging 13,770 British thermal units per pound. 

Arlington Station, 69,015,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal 
averaging 13,550 British thermal units per pound. 

Hyde Park Station, 59,815,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal 
averaging 13,260 British thermal units per pound. 



34 



P. D. 48 



Distribution Reservoirs 



The locations, elevations and capacities of the distribution reservoirs of 
the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations 


Elevation of 
High Water " 


Capacity in 
Gallons 


Low Service: 

Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston . 

Weston Reservoir, Weston 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford 

Northern High Service: 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham 

Northern Extra High Service: 

Southern High Service: 

Southern Extra High Service: 

Bellevue Reservoir, steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston 


163 . 00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.50 

251.00 
264 . 50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

2,000,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 


Total 


— 


2,400,680,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the maintenance of 
its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the Metropolitan Water 
Works, and the reservoir is used when necessary in connection with the 
northern high-service supply. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 
gallons with high-water line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in service 
from January 1 to April 2 and from December 19 to the end of the year. The 
remainder of the year it was kept full for emergency use. 

The city of Maiden standpipe on Waitt's Mount, which is under the care 
and control of the Division, was filled April 27 and was kept full the rest of 
the year. Its capacity is 1,120,000 gallons with high-water line at elevation 
250. 

With the exception of 3 hours, on October 27, the Mystic Reservoir was 
not in service, but was kept full for emergency use. Repairs were made to 
the damaged sections of the iron fence around the reservoir, following a July 
4th celebration, and three new sections were used to replace the more badly 
damaged sections. Water in the Upper Mystic Lake was kept near high- 
water line, except when drawn down to care for heavy flows expected from 
the watershed. 

At Arlington Reservoir the grounds were fertilized and seeded. The 
masonry tower was open to the public, under the supervision of the Metro- 
politan Park Police, on Sundays and holidays between 2 o'clock and sunset 
from May 30 to December 1. 

In May at the southerly end of Spot Pond a path was cleared on water 
works land, 1,960 feet in length, between Main Street and Woodland Road, 
and during the month of October a path 1,840 feet in length was built along 
the easterly side of the pond between the boat-house and Half Mile Road. 
In order to keep surface water from the pond the embankment along the 
path at Woodland Road and Pond Street, near Short Beach, was raised. 

Under Acts of 1924, chapter 240, loaded as well as blank cartridges were 
fired to drive away gulls and other birds from Spot Pond and Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, but no birds were killed during the year at either place. 

The Park Division was paid $1,128.25 for police service at Spot Pond and 
$4,635.29 for police service at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Bradlee Basin of Chestnut Hill Reservoir was in service throughout the 
year and the Lawrence Basin between May 8 and June 2, July 19 and August 
21, and from September 21 to October 2. 

The gate stems of the sluice valves in the intermediate gatehouse at Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir, which have been in service more than 50 years, were 



P. D. 48 35 

found to be badly corroded and have been removed and will be replaced with 
rustless steel stems. 

The drives around Chestnut Hill pumping stations and the drive between 
the Lawrence and Bradlee basins were resurfaced and 3,983 square yards of 
the roadway were given a 2-inch coat of penetrated asphalt macadam, and 
7,365 square yards were given a surfacing of liquid asphalt and pea stone, 
under a contract with Ezekiel C. Sargent of Quincy at a cost of $6,151.14. 

At Waban Hill Reservoir the Ward Street bank was spaded and all the 
banks were spread with fertilizer. At Fisher Hill Reservoir the old broken 
down wooden fence on the property lines has been removed and will be re- 
placed with a new wire fence supported by reinforced concrete posts which 
have been made by the department and delivered on the ground. 

The Forbes Hill standpipe has been in service throughout the year and the 
Forbes Hill Reservoir has been kept full ready for emergency use. New 
doors were built and placed in the gate-house and a new shut-off installed on 
the overflow. 

Bellevue Reservoir was in service all the year. The tower was kept clean 
and opened to the public on Sundays and holidays, under supervision of the 
Parks Division, from May 30 to December 1. 

At Weston Reservoir new copper float was installed in the screen chamber 
and considerable work was required at certain seasons of the year to keep the 
leaves from blocking the screens. 

The grounds and structures at all of the distribution reservoirs have been 
given the necessary attention to keep them in good condition and the sluice 
gates and screens have been operated as required to maintain satisfactory 
service. 

Distribution Buildings and Grounds 

Repairs have been made to roofs and gutters of the terminal, screen and 
channel chambers of the Weston Aqueduct. Alterations have been made 
in the building at Chestnut Hill Reservoir formerly used as a stable which 
has now been converted into a carpenter and machine shop. New doors 
and windows have been installed, the entire interior painted, concrete floor 
laid in the basement and the building has been furnished throughout with 
electric lights. 

In November a contract was made with Everett F. Penshorn of Boston 
for repairs to the roofs and gutters of water works buildings at the Mystic 
shops and reservoir, and at the end of the year the work was about 65 per cent 
completed. 

Repairs to the roofs of the buildings at Spot Pond, which were started in 
1924, were completed early in the spring. At the Glenwood yard the portion 
of the main building formerly used as a stable has been converted into a 
garage, with men's room and toilet rooms. A fire door was installed in the 
storage room over the garage and one room was finished off as a meter repair 
room. New deadmen were set for the derrick in the pipe yard and recording 
pressure gages were installed on the high service and low service systems. 

New gates were set in the fence adjoining the side track at Arlington 
Station and repairs were made to the fence around the grounds at the 
Hyde Park Station. 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

Special measures have been taken at different times during the year to 
improve conditions of low pressure that occurred in Swampscott, Nahant, 
Quincy, Belmont and Watertown. Between November 16 and January 1, 
the town of Marblehead was supplied with 20,100,000 gallons of water from 
the Metropolitan Works through the Swampscott system as an emergency 
supply while repairs were being made to the pump well at the Marblehead 
pumping station. 

The 24-inch Mystic main laid in 1864 between Mystic Reservoir and the 
Charlestown line, about 14,087 feet in length, was cleaned during October 
and November under a contract with the National Water Main Cleaning 
Company. 



36 P. D. 48 

The wire fence around water works land at the Commonwealth Armory in 
Brighton, which was removed last year, has been replaced with a 2-rail 1 Yr 
inch iron pipe fence. 

A connection between the Newton emergency pumping unit in Ward 
Street and the 36-inch southern high-service Metropolitan Water Works 
main was completed in May and it is now possible by means of this unit to 
furnish more adequate pressure to the higher portions of Belmont and Water- 
town. 

Tests were made to determine the leakage under certain pressures of a 
portion of the old Cambridge Water Works 30-inch cast-iron main in Wal- 
tham and Watertown, which it was thought it might be desirable to use as a 
portion of a connecting branch line between the Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains in Waltham and the low-service distribution system of the town of 
Watertown. 

The portion of the 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main between the 
terminal chamber in Weston and Brighton Street in Belmont, a distance of 
about 39,000 feet, which has been under construction for more than a year, 
was put into service on September 23, supplying a part of the town of Bel- 
mont, and the remainder of the line, as far as Massachusetts Avenue in 
Arlington, was put in service October 26, delivering 5,000,000 gallons of 
water per day. 

Repairs have been made to pipe boxes at the Chelsea North Bridge, the 
Fox Hill Bridge at the Lynn and Saugus line and the Pines River Bridge at 
the Revere-Saugus line. 

There were three breaks in Metropolitan Water Works main pipes during 
the year; one at the blow-off at Pines River, which was frozen; one at 
Atlantic Avenue, Revere, and one at Washington Street, Lynn, both of which 
were probably caused by electrolysis. There were 47 leaks discovered in the 
Metropolitan mains during the year, which were repaired at a total cost of 
$3,249.76. Of this number 11 were at defective wooden joints, the cost of 
repairing which was $745.46. Of the remainder 32 were lead joints in cast- 
iron mains, 3 in the 10-inch kalamine pipe purchased from Swampscott in 
1909, and one in 60-inch lockbar steel pipe. 

There are now 74 Venturi meters from 6 to 60 inches in diameter in the 
distribution pipe lines. Sixty- three of these are on supplies to various towns 
in the Metropolitan Water District, 3 on Western Aqueduct Supply Mains, 
1 each at the Hyde Park, Spot Pond and Arlington pumping stations and on 
emergency connections to Cambridge, Newton and Wakefield, one between 
the Fisher Hill force main and the Spot Pond mains and one on the Clinton 
Road line in front of effluent gate-house No. 1 at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The nine pressure regulating valves in the distribution mains, for reducing 
the pressure of the water supplied to Nahant, Revere, Swampscott and Win- 
throp and to portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park have given 
satisfactory service. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 24 stations on the distri- 
bution system and tables in the Appendix show the hydraulic grade at 18 of 
these stations as determined from the charts. 

A complete stock of pipes, specials and other materials and supplies re- 
quired for maintaining and operating the pipe lines has been kept on hand 
at the Glenwood pipe yard in Medford and at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard in 
Brighton, and an auto truck equipped with a gate-operating attachment has 
been stationed at each yard with men on duty ready to operate them in case 
of emergency any time during the day or night. 

Consumption of Water 

During the year 46,847,678,000 gallons of water were furnished from the 
Metropolitan Water Works to the 18 cities and towns supplied. This is 
equivalent to an average daily consumption of 128,349,800 gallons and for 
the estimated population of 1,303,020 is at the rate of 98.5 gallons per capita 
per day, an increase of 2 gallons per capita per day on the basis of the 1925 
census. 



\ 



POPULATION , CONSUMPTION OF WATER and per CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1925 

FROM 1890 TO 1925 





























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[920 


1922 


1924 



Note Estimated population and consumption per capita given on diagram published in annual reports 1916 to 1919 
inclusive have been revised and are here shown in accordance with 1920 census 



P. D. 48 37 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services metered in 
the Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1925, and for the period from 
1890 to 1925, inclusive, are shown graphically by the accompanying diagram. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities in 
the Metropolitan Water District during 1924 and 1925, is as follows: — 











Estimated 




Average 


: Daily Consumption 






1924 


1925 






Popula- 










Increase 




tion, 1925 


Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita 


Gallons 


Gallons 
per Capita 


in 
Gallons 


Arlington 


24,940 


1,395,000 


59 


1,576,400 


63 


181,400 


Belmont . 








15,260 


887,200 


61 


1,047,600 


69 


160,400 


Boston . 








779,620 


87,680,900 


113 


89,724,700 


115 


2,043,800 


Chelsea . 








47,250 


3,551,700 


76 


3,660,400 


77 


108,700 


Everett . 








42,070 


4,491,500 


108 


5,281,000 


126 


789,500 


Lexington 








7,790 


448,000 


60 


492,900 


63 


44,900 


Maiden . 








51,790 


2,859,900 


56 


2,968,400 


57 


108,500 


Medford 








47,630 


2,441,400 


53 


2,507,600 


53 


66,200 


Melrose . 








20,160 


1,247,400 


63 


1,253,800 


62 


6,400 


Milton . 








12,860 


537,000 


44 


604,000 


47 


67,000 


Nahant . 








1,630 


195,800 


125 


176,000 


108 


19,8001 


Quincy . 








60,060 


4,352,400 


75 


4,478,200 


75 


125,800 


Revere . 








33,260 


2,293,300 


71 


2,377,900 


71 


84,600 


Somerville 








99,030 


7,760,100 


79 


7,955,500 


80 


195,400 


Stoneham 








9,080 


600,900 


68 


574,000 


63 


26,9001 


Swampscott 








8,950 


731,100 


83 


753,900 


84 


22,800 


Watertown 








25,480 


1,657,100 


67 


1,887,500 


74 


230,400 


Winthrop 








16,160 


969,000 


60 


1,030,000 


64 


61,000 


District Supplied 


1,303,020 


124,099,700 


97 


128,349,800 


99 


4,250,100 


Brookline 2 




42,680 


3,969,300 


95 


4,068,700 


95 


99,400 


Newton . 




53,020 


4,108,300 


79 


4,181,800 


79 


73,500 


Total Distr 


ict 






1,398,720 


132,177,300 


96 


136,600,300 


98 


4,423,000 



i Decrease 



2 Admitted to District January 1, 1925 



The consumption by districts in 1925 as compared with 1924 is as follows: — 





Gallons 

per Day 

1925 


Increase from 1924 




Gallons 
per Day 


Percent- 
age 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service dis- 
trict of Boston with the exception of Charlestown and East 
Boston 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service dis- 
trict Arlington, Belmont, Charlestown, Chelsea, East Bos- 
ton, Everett, Maiden, Medford and Somerville . 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Water- 
town, the high-service districts of Boston and portions of 
Belmont and Milton 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Nahant, 
Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott and Winthrop, and the 
high service districts of Chelsea, East Boston, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford and Somerville 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher 
portions of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington, 
and the higher portions of Arlington and Belmont 


41,624,500 
29,086,600 
44,282,400 

11,072,500 
1,010,800 
1,273,000 


444,700 
1,277,500 
2,108,900 

285,500 

3,100 

130,400 


1.1 
4.6 

4.8 

2.6 

0.3 

11.4 


Supplied from local sources, Brookline and Newton . 


128,349,800 
8,250,500 


4,250,100 
172,900 


3.4 
2.1 




136,600,300 


4,423,000 


3.3 



Through the emergency connection on Ward Street near Hammond Street, 
water was furnished to the city of Newton every month in the year with 
the exception of the month of March, the total quantity supplied being 
186,970,000 gallons, or 173,470,000 gallons in excess of the quantity the city 



38 P. D. 48 

is entitled to take free of charge under the agreement made in 1900 when the 
Waban Hill Reservoir was purchased from the city, and for this water the 
city will pay the sum of $10,156.67. 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 

Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes by the 
municipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water Works is 
given in Table No. 22 in Appendix No. 3. 

Water Supplied from Metropolitan Water Works and used Outside 

Metropolitan Water District 



Places Supplied 



City of Worcester . 
Town of Clinton 
Westborough State Hospital 
Town of Westborough . 
Town of Framingham . 
Town of Natick . 
United States Government: 
Peddock's Island . 



Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

Supplied 



204 
253 
365 
365 
365 
365 

365 



Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons) 



942,300,000 
162,400,000 
70,128,000 
137,800,000 
504,118,882 
220,800,000 

21,586,000 



Average 
Quantity 
(Gallons) 
per Day) 



2,581,643 
444,932 
192,000 
377,534 

1,381,148 
604,932 

59,140 



Amount 
Charged 



$37,692 00 

2,103 84 

20,164 76 

1,407 93 



Filtration of Water 

The experiments begun in 1923 to obtain information concerning the im- 
provement by nitration of the portion of the water supply not now used for 
consumption because of its objectionable color have been completed. Gen- 
eral plans and estimates have been made for filtration works for purifying 
the waters of the 47 square miles of the South Sudbury watershed which have 
not been used for water supply since 1912. 

Water Works Statistics 
Statistics relating to the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works for 
the year 1925 are given in tables in the Appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM E. FOSS, Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 2, 1926. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER OF 

SEWERAGE DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir : — The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1925, is respectfully 
submitted : — 

Organization 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction 
of all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works con- 
trolled by the Metropolitan District Commission for removing sewage from 
the twenty-six municipalities which comprise the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: — 

Henry T. Stiff, Senior Assistant Engineer, in charge of office and drafting 
room and of the construction work. 

Charles F. Fitz, Assistant Engineer, in charge of maintenance studies and 
records and of maintenance construction work on the North Metropolitan 
System. 

Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey work and field 
work in connection with the Mill Brook Valley Sewer construction. 



P. D. 48 39 

Thomas L. Whelan, Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewerage 
District. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewerage 
District. 

In addition to the above, the maximum number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year was 14, which includes 2 instrument men, 
3 inspectors, 1 draftsman, 6 rodmen and engineering assistants and 2 stenog- 
raphers. 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS 

Areas and Populations 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the metro- 
politan sewerage districts. 

Chapter 59 of the Acts of 1924 provided for the addition of Needham to 
the south metropolitan sewerage district. This Act was accepted by the 
voters of the town of Needham in March, 1924. The Act provides that said 
town shall become a part of the district upon connection of any sewer of said 
town with metropolitan sewers. No such connection has yet been made. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, are based 
on the census of 1925. 

Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 31, 1925 



City or Town 


Area (Square 
Miles) 


Estimated 
Population 




Arlington 


5.20 


25,510 




Belmont 






4.66 


15,670 




Boston (portj 


ions o 


f) ; 




3.45 


104,460 




Cambridge . 








6.11 


120,580 


a 


Chelsea 








2.24 


47,620 


eg 


Everett 








3.34 


42,250 


o 


Lexington l . 








5.11 


6,350 


Pt<4B 

O © 


Maiden 








5.07 


52,030 


fii - 


Medford 








8.35 


48,410 


£1 


Melrose 








3.73 


20,340 


Reading 








9.82 


8,800 


49 


Revere 








5.86 


33,670 


£ 


Somerville 








3.96 


99,570 


s 


Stoneham 
Wakefield . 
Winchester . 
Winthrop 
k Wobum 








5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 


9,190 
15,850 
11,660 
16,220 
18,530 










inn °° 


fiofi 7i n 




1UU . k>L 


U«?U, / 1U 


a 
J 

'J2 


Boston (port 


ions of) 




24.96 


309,080 


Brookline 






6.81 


43,130 


O 

ft ■-» 


Dedham ■ 








9.40 


14,100 


o © 


Milton 








12.59 


13,170 


H t-l 


Newton 








16.88 


53,650 


£.9 


Quincy 








12.56 


61,160 


Waltham 








13.63 


35,100 


53 

3 


Watertown 








4.04 


25,850 


£ 


Wellesley 








9.89 


9,310 


W4 




i in 7fi 


^fil ^0 




11U . / u 


0\rx,tjKj\J 




Totals 


• 


• 


• 


211.08 


1,261,260 



1 Part of town. 



40 



P. D. 48 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS 



Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections 



During the year there have been 0.985 miles of Metropolitan sewers built 
within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 121.355 miles of Metro- 
politan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, with the Quincy Pump- 
ing Station, have been purchased from cities and towns of the districts. The 
remaining 111.713 miles of sewers and other works have been constructed by 
the Metropolitan Boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the following 
tables, together with other data referring to the public and special connections 
with the systems : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



City or Town 



Boston: — 
Deer Island 



East Boston 
Charlestown 
Winthrop . 

Chelsea 



Everett 

Lexington 
Maiden 

Melrose 
Cambridge 



Size of Sewers 



4' 0" to 9' 0" . 

9' 0" to 1' 0" . 
6'7"X7'5"to 1'0" 
9'0" . . 



8'4"X9'2" to 15' 



8' 2" X 8' 10" to 4'8" X 5'1" 



4' 6"X4'10" to l'O" 



4'6"X4' 10" to 10" 



5'2"X5'9"tol'3" . 



•v 



a 
h3 



1.653 

5.467 
3.292 

2.864 



5.230 



2.925 



5.8441 



6.0993 



7.209 



§S2 

ojoo 

.2 a t. 

•§■■3.0 



25 
15 
14 

14{ 



1 
35. 

39 

49 



Special Connections 



Character or Location of 
Connection 



Shoe factory 

Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co 

Navy Yard 

Private building 

Club House 

Fire department station. 

Private building 

Bakery .... 

Rendering Works 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs .... 

Naval Hospital 

U. S. Lighthouse Service 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off 

Cameron Appliance Co. 

Shultz-Goodwin Co. 

Andrews- Wasgatt Co. 

National Metallic Bed Co. 

Linoide Co. 

Factory .... 

New England Structural Co. 

Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-off 
Private buildings 
Private buildings 
Factory 

Railroad station 
Park Department bath-house 
Harvard dormitories 
Slaughterhouse 
City Hospital . 
Street Railway machine shop 
Private building 
Factory building 



* 5 
•~ o 

hS 

£ u 

SO) 
-. o. 

1° 



1 

9 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



1 
2192 

128 * 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and 
made parts of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

4 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 
and with a sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metro- 
politan Sewerage System. 



P. D. 48 41 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections — Con. 







02 

J 


SStO 


Special Connections 










c w co 










2 


g£S 
















a 


o«^- 




.=. o 


City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 


og? 


Character or Location of 


v 3 






a 


ubli 
tio 
bei 


Connection 


unb 
per 






£ 


fr 




£° 








r 


Tannery 


1 










Slaughterhouses (3) 


1 










Carhouse 


1 










Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville . 


6'5"X7'2"tolO" . 


3.577 


14- 


off 

Street railway power house . 
Stable .... 
Rendering works 
Railroad scale pit . 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 








• 


Private building 
Armory building 


1 
1 


Medford . 


4'8"X5'l"tolO" . 


6.306 


26" 


Private buildings 

Stable 


9 
1 








1 


Police substation 

Tanneries .... 

Private buildings 

Gelatine factory 

Watch-hand factory 

Stable 


1 

6 

10 

1 
1 

1 


Winchester 


4' 6" to 1' 3' 


10.420 


31 


Railroad station 
Felt works .... 
Town Hall .... 
Bay State Saw & Tool Co. . 
Whitney Machine Co. . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Divi- 
sion 


2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


Stoneham 


1' 8" to 10" 


2.333 


4 


— — 


— 


Woburn . 


2 / 6"X2'7"tol'3" 


1.186 


3 


Glue factory .... 
Private buildings 
Private buildings 


4 

1 

1832 


Arlington . 


3'0"X3'6"tolO" . 


4.199 1 


53 


Railroad station 

Car house .... 

Post office .... 


1 
3 

1 


Belmont 3 . 


— — 


— 


3 


— — 


— 


Wakefield . 


3'0"to2'0"X2'3" . 


0.703 


1 


— — 


— 


Revere 


4' 0" to 15" 


0.136 


3 


— — 


— 


Reading . 




0.055 


1 




— 




69.4984 


344 


631 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 
and made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Belmont. 

4 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



City or Town 



Boston: — 
Back Bay 



Brighton 



Size of Sewers 



6' 6" to 3' 9" 



5'9"X6'0"tol2" 



a 

a 
-1 



1.5001 



6.0102 



SB*, 

a "co 

© OQ CO 



16 



» 



Special Connections 



Character or Location of 
Connection 



Tufts Medical School . 
Private house . 
Administration Building, Bos 

ton Park Department 
Simmons College Buildings 
Art Museum . 
Prince District Elementary 

School .... 
Private buildings . 
Abattoir .... 



a c 

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1° 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



42 P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections — Con. 







05 

Q 

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Special Connections 








s 


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Chocolate works 
Machine shop . 


2 
1 


Dorchester . 


3'X4'to2'6"X2'7" 


2.8701 


13 


Paper Mill .... 

Private buildings 

Edison Electric Company Sta- 


1 
3 








• 


tion . 
Mattapan Paper Mills 


1 
2 


Hyde Park . 


10'7"X11'7" to4'0"X4'l" 


4.527 


19 


Private buildings 

Fairview Cemetery buildings 


2 
1 


Roxbury 


6'6"X7' to4'0" 


1.430 


— 


— — 


_ 










Caledonia Grove buildings 


1 


West Roxbury 


9' 3" X 10' 2" to 12" . 


7.643 


17 


Parental School 

Lutheran Evangelical Church 

Private buildings 


1 
1 
6 


Brookline . 


6'6"X7'0"to8" 


2.5402 


14 


Private buildings 


2 


Dedham . 


4'X4'l"to2'9"X3' 


5.012 


8 { 


Private buildings 
Dedham Carpet Mills . 


2 
1 


Hull 3 


60" pipe .... 


0.750 


— 


— — 


_ 


Milton 


11' X 12' to 8" . 


3.600 


25 


Private buildings . 


3 


Newton 


4'2"X4'9"to 1'3" . 


2.911 


9 
f 


Private houses 
Metropolitan Water Works 


11 


Quincy 


H'3"Xl2'6"to24"pipe . 


7.392 


18 ( 


blow-off .... 
Squantum schoolhouse , 


1 
1 


Waltham . 


3'6"X4'0" 


0.001 


1 

f 


Factories 


2 


Watertown 


4'2"X4'9"tol2" . 


0.7504 


1 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co. . 
Knights of Pythias building . 


1 
1 


Needham 3 


2'0"X2'3" to 2'3"X2'6" 


4.921 


I 
"l 


Walker-Gordon Co. 
Private buildings 


1 
1 


Wellesley 5 




— 


1 




— 




51.857 


163 


60 



1 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

3 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

4 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

5 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 

Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections and 
other data for the Metropolitan sewerage districts appears in the following 
table : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Area 
(Square 
Miles) 



100.32 



Estimated 

Total 
Population 



696,710 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

Connected 



856.39 



Estimated 

Population 

Contributing 

Sewage 



642,910 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 

Population 

(Per cent) 



92.3 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers 



Public 



344 



Special 



631 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District 



110.76 



564,550 



765.79 



451,290 



79.9 



163 



60 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 



211.08 



1,261,260 



1,622.18 



1,094,200 



86.8 



507 



691 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,261,260 on December 31, 1925, 
1,094,200 representing 86.8 per cent, were on that date contributing sewage 






P. D. 48 43 

to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length of 1,622.18 miles of local 
sewers owned by the individual cities and towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan Systems by 507 public 
and 691 special connections. During the current year there has been an 
increase of 40.96 miles of local sewers connected with the Metropolitan 
Systems, and 15 public and 23 special connections have been added. 

CONSTRUCTION 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer -Arlington 

Chapter 65, Resolves of 1923, authorized a survey and study for a sewer 
in Mill Brook Valley, Arlington, in accordance with the requirements of 
Chapter 520, Acts of 1897. Chapter 116, Acts of 1924, authorized the con- 
struction of this work. This sewer will extend from West Medford at Warren 
Street through public streets and private lands to Forest Street in Arlington. 
It will be divided into four sections. The lower section, numbered 77, ex- 
tends from Warren Street, West Medford, through High Street, to near the 
Mystic River. A contract for the construction of this section was described 
in last year's report. Work on this section was completed during 1925. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer -Section 78 

The work known as Section 78 of the North Metropolitan System is located 
in Medford and Arlington, Mass., and consists of a 36-inch by 42-inch con- 
crete sewer in trench and tunnel and two parallel lines of 30-inch cast-iron 
pipe sewer and 20-inch and 16-inch cast-iron pipe sewer siphon extending from 
a point in land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts near the Mystic 
River, westerly through land of said Commonwealth in Medford, crossing 
said Mystic River and continuing westerly in Arlington through other land 
of Commonwealth of Massachusetts and through Medford Street, Hayes 
Street, Mystic Lake Drive, lands of L. N. Russell and I. F. Carpenter, Mt. 
Pleasant Cemetery, crossing Mill Brook, thence extending through Fowle 
Avenue and land of town of Arlington to a point in Mystic Street. Some 
particulars of this contract are as follows: 

Date of contract No. 19 (Sewerage Division) April 16, 1925. 

Name of contractor, Anthony Baruffaldi Company. 

Length of section, 3,325 feet. 

Length of 36-inch by 42-inch concrete sewer in trench, 1,700 feet. 

Length of 36-inch by 42-inch concrete and brick sewer in tunnel, 1,080 feet. 

Length of 30-inch, 20-inch and 16-inch cast-iron pipe sewer, 545 feet. 

Average depth of excavation in trench, 10 feet. 

Average depth of sewer in tunnel, 31 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Work was begun on this section April 22, 1925, and at this time, (December 
31, 1925), 2,340 feet of sewer in trench and tunnel have been built and 352 
feet of double line of 30-inch cast-iron pipe sewer have been laid. 

No especial difficulties have been encountered in the construction of this 
work. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer -Section 79 

The work known as Section 79 of the North Metropolitan System is 
located in Arlington, Mass., and consists of a 24-inch and 20-inch Akron pipe 
main line sewer and a 20-inch Akron pipe and 10-inch cast-iron pipe branch 
line relief sewer. The main line sewer extends from a point in Mystic Street 
at its junction with Summer Street westerly through Summer Street and 
Water Street, land of the Huff Electrostatic Separator Company, crossing 
under the Lexington Branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad, thence extend- 
ing through lands of Elizabeth Sullivan and the Frost Insecticide Company, 
crossing Mill Street, thence extending through other land of the Frost Insecti- 
cide Company, lands of the town of Arlington and of the Arlington Gas Light 



44 P. D. 48 

Company to a point in Grove Street, a total distance of about 3,790 linear 
feet. The branch relief sewer extends from a manhole near the junction of 
Mystic Street and Summer Street in the Metropolitan Sewer now under 
construction southerly through Mystic Street and land of the Huff Electro- 
static Separator Company, crossing Mill Brook, thence extending through 
Mystic Street to a manhole at the junction of Mystic and Chestnut Streets 
in the existing Metropolitan Sewer, a total distance of about 1,268 linear 
feet. 

The work included under this section has been placed under contract, some 
particulars of which are as follows: 

Date of contract No. 21 (Sewerage Division) December 3, 1925. 

Name of contractor, Antony Cefalo. 

Length of section, 5,058 feet. 

Diameters of pipe sewers, 20-inch and 24-inch. 

Diameter of cast-iron siphon pipes, 10-inches. 

Average depth of excavation, main line, 8 feet. 

Average depth of excavation, relief sewer, 10 feet. 

Maximum depth in tunnel, 31 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Work was started on this section December 7, 1925, and at this date 
(December 31, 1925) 880 feet of 20-inch pipe sewer have been laid. 

MAINTENANCE 

Scope of Work and Force Employed 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes the 
operating of 8 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house and 121.355 
miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge from 1,622.18 miles of 
town and city sewers at 507 points, together with the care and study of 
inverted siphons under streams and in the harbor. 

At present the permanent maintenance force consists of 174 men, of whom 
108 are employed on the North System and 66 on the South System. These 
are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 67 engineers and 
other employees in the pumping stations and 41 men, including foremen, on 
maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds; South Metropolitan 
System, 41 engineers and other employees in the pumping stations and 25 
men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and 
grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation of the 
pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning and inspecting 
sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, outfall sewers, regulators and over- 
flows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections to the Metropolitan 
sewers, and the care of pumping stations and other buildings, grounds and 
wharves. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by the main- 
tenance employees in this department as follows : — 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

Attention has been called in previous reports to the condition of the wharf 
at Deer Island. No appropriation has been allowed for the erection of a new 
wharf. Either extensive repairs must be made or a new wharf constructed. 
This wharf is in an unsafe condition and the coal run is barely usable. 

Extensive repairs have been made at this station on pumping units No. 1 
and No. 2. On unit No. 1 a new composition sleeve and new steady bearing 
on the 10-inch shaft were installed. On unit No. 2 the wheel was removed 
from the casing and a new contact ring secured in place by Portland concrete 
was inserted. On this pump there were furnished a new lower shaft, new 
sleeve and new steady bearing. On pump No. 4 a new lower section of 12- 
inch shaft and a new steady bearing with a new sleeve were installed. All of 
the pumps at this station have now been equipped with the new type of 
steady bearing which we have adopted for all the north line stations. 

The head houses at Shirley Gut, both on the Winthrop side and on the Deer 



P. D. 48 45 

Island side, were rebuilt. The masonry in these structures is seriously- 
affected by the gases, the passage of which is interfered with by the Shirley 
Gut Siphon. This is the second time the head house on the Point Shirley side 
has been reconstructed. 

The Green economizer at this station has been replaced by a new one of the 
same type. 

New dampers were placed in the chimney passages and the lightning rod 
on the chimney was repaired by the placing of new points with new copper 
cables and new fastenings. The masonry on the chimney was pointed from 
the top downward for a distance of about 30 feet. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

The 100,000,000-gallon pumping unit No. 4 at this station received repairs 
in the shape of new lower section of 12-inch shaft, new bronze sleeve and a 
new steady bearing. 

The boiler room was repainted, including piping and all other fixtures. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

At this station a new impeller wheel was inserted in pump No. 1. Other 
repairs to this unit consisted of the installation of a new contact ring in casing 
secured in place by Portland concrete, a new composition sleeve and a new 
steady bearing. 

The copper on the roof of this pumping station had been in position for 
over thirty years. It had become so badly corroded that it was no longer 
possible to keep the roof tight. The old copper valleys, crickets, gutters, 
flashings and a large part of the cupola over the coal house were removed and 
replaced by new 24-ounce copper. A new copper skylight was erected over 
the machine shop. 

This work was done by a firm of roofers in conjunction with the mainte- 
nance employees. 

Ward Street Pumping Station 

At this station the new Morris pump and Nordberg engine were put into 
service April 17, 1925. They have been used for considerable of the time 
since this period. The indications are that this new pump and engine will be 
a very satisfactory unit. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

In addition to the regular service at this station during the year 3,626 lbs. 
of brass castings have been made and distributed among the several pumping 
stations. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

During the year the usual precautions have been maintained against the 
introduction of gasolene into the Metropolitan Sewers. An inspector has 
been employed who covers both North and South Metropolitan Sewerage 
Districts. His duties are to see that all newly constructed garages or other 
gasolene using establishments are supplied with a proper gasolene separator 
and also to see that these separators are kept in working condition. 

During the year 1925 a smaller number of permits for garages and places 
where gasolene is used was issued than during the year 1924, namely, 1,864. 
Each of these permits necessitates an examination by our inspector. Many 
of them, however, are attended to through the mails and do not require a 
personal visit. Visits are made, however, to all locations where a connection 
is to be made with the public sewer system and to such places as do not re- 
spond to the return postal cards sent out. During the year 88 such places 
were connected with the sewers that empty into the Metropolitan Systems. 
At the present time, there are, according to our records, 1,358 garages and 
other establishments where gasolene is used connected with the local sewerage 
systems which discharge into the Metropolitan sewers. 

This system of inspection has given satisfactory results. Occasionally 
odors of gasolene are detected in the sewers but the amount is not sufficient 
to be dangerous and the situation appears to be well in hand. 



46 



P. D. 48 



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P. D. 48 49 

PUMPING STATIONS 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds- 
Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 50,800,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 78,100,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 148,000,000 gallons. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds- 
Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 73,100,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 76,100,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 146,000,000 gallons. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of them having 
impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 feet in diameter. They 
are driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 56,300,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 45,000,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 69,300,000 gallons. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 

The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews commercial cen- 
trifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to compound marine 
engines, together with a pump and engine added later. The latter consists 
of a specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, having 
between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 
Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 
Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 19,900,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,900,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 11,200,000 gallons. 

Reading Pumping Station 

At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, of 2,500,000 gallons 
per 24 hours, and 4,000,000 gallons per 24 hours, capacity. These operate 
against a maximum head of 65 feet, and are actuated by vertical shafts 
directly connected with 75 and 100 horsepower motors. Alternating current 
of 440 volts furnished by the municipal plant of the town of Reading is used. 

Average quantity pumped per 24 hours: 783,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 833,000 gallons. 



50 



P. D. 48 



South Metropolitan System 



Ward Street Pumping Station 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, of the 
Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plungers of which 
are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. The 50,000,000-gallon 
centrifugal pumping unit was put into service April 17, 1925. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year 72,200,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 35,110, 000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 70,820,000 gallons. 

Quincy Pumping Station 

The plant at this station consists of one compound condensing Deane 
duplex piston pumping unit and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a 
Sturtevant compound condensing engine and one Morris centrifugal pump 
driven by a Morris compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Morris centrifugal 10,000,000 gallons; 

Deane, 5,000,000 gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average duty for the year: 23,600,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,002,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 15,961,000 gallons. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate actuated by 
small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two vertical Deane boilers, 
80 horsepower each, operate the engines, provide heat and light for the house, 
burn materials intercepted at the screens, and furnish power for the Quincy 
(Hough's Neck) sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 63,700,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity passing screens per day: 166,000,000 gallons. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps with ~ 
vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from the Nut 
Island Screen-house, and as used at present it does not materially increase 
the amount of coal used at the latter station. 

Average quantity raised each day : 212,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 449,600 gallons. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Seven Principal Metro- 
politan Sewerage Pumping Stations and at the Quincy {Hough's Neck) 
Sewage Lifting Station during the Year, as compared with the Correspond- 
ing Volumes for the Previous Year. 



, 


Average Daily Pumpage 


Pumping Station 










Jan. 1, 1925, 


Jan. 1, 1924, 






to Dec. 31, 


to Dec. 31, 


Increase during the 




1925 


1924 


Year 




Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Per Cent 




78,100,000 


74,900,000 


3,200,000 


4.3 




76,100,000 


72,900,000 


3,200,000 


4.4 




45,000,000 


41,600,000 


3,400,000 


8.2 




5,900,000 


5,560,000 


340,000 


6.1 




783,000 


740,000 


43,000 


5.8 


Quincy 


5,002,000 


5,029,000 


27,000 1 


0.51 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped) . 


35,110,000 


34,200,000 


910,000 


2.7 


Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting station 


212,000 


214,000 


2,000 » 


0.9 1 



1 Decrease. 



P. D. 48 51 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Districts now have outfalls in Boston Harbor 
at five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the North District 
and three from the South District. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been discharged 
wholly through the outlet located near Deer Island light. The other outfall 
of this system is closed by a cast-iron cover which can easily be removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District two extend for a distance exceeding 
one mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the third one, called an 
emergency outlet, extends about 1 ,500 feet from the same. It was necessary 
to discharge through this outfall three times during the year. The total 
duration of these discharges was twenty-four hours and forty-five minutes. 

During the year an inspection was made of these outfalls by a diver. The 
outfalls themselves, together with the stone reinforcement about them, were 
all found to be in good condition and practically free from all obstruction. 
The only deposit found in any of them was a small amount in the westerly 
line of the south system. This, however, was so small and of such little 
influence that it was not considered necessary to remove it. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan District 
outfall at Deer Island has been 78,100,000 gallons of sewage per 24 hours, 
with a maximum rate of 148,000,000 gallons during a stormy period in 
December, 1925. The amount of sewage discharged in the North Metro- 
politan District averaged 121 gallons per day for each person, taking the 
estimated population of the District contributing sewage. If the sewers in 
this District were restricted to the admission of sewage proper only, this per 
capita amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 63,700,000 gallons of 
sewage per 24 hours has passed through the screens at the Nut Island screen- 
house and has been discharged from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The 
maximum rate of discharge per day which occurred during a stormy period 
in December, 1925, was 166,000,000 gallons. The discharge of sewage 
through these outfalls represents the amount of sewage contributed by the 
South Metropolitan District, which was at the rate of 141 gallons per day per 
person of the estimated number contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in the South 
Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan District, because, 
owing to the large size and unused capacity of the South District High-level 
Sewer, more storm water is at present admitted to the sewers of this District. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the North Metro- 
politan Sewerage Stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating 
materials, has during the year amounted to 1 ,894 cubic yards. This is equiva- 
lent to 2.43 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer 
Island. 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the South Metro- 
politan Sewerage Stations amounted to 3,517 cubic yards, equal to 5.52 
cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall works at Nut 
Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons indicate 
that they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division. 

Boston, January 1, 1926. 



52 P. D. 48 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

PARKS DIVISION 

Loan Appropriations 

The appropriations heretofore made in the form of loans, with accretions 
thereto, are as follows: — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 

Original appropriation, chapter 407, Acts of 1893 $1,000,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 483, Acts of 1894 500,000 00 

Charles River Act, chapter 509, Acts of 1894 300,00000 

General appropriation, chapter 305, Acts of 1895 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 466, Acts of 1896 1,000,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1897 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 530, Acts of 1898 1,000,000 00 

Revere Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 142, Acts of 1899 125,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 406, Acts of 1899 300,000 00 

Charles River Improvement Act, chapter 465, Acts of 1900 50,000 00 

Fuller's Wharf Act, chapter 467, Acts of 1900 30,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 445, Acts of 1901 450,000 00 

Mystic River Bridge Act, chapter 492, Acts of 1901 200,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 290, Acts of 1903 125,000 00 

Newton Upper Falls Bridge Act, chapter 391, Acts of 1903 40,000 00 

Continuing appropriation, chapter 429, Acts of 1903 1,500,000 00 

Nahant Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 326, Acts of 1904 70,000 00 

Reimbursing loan for moth expense, chapter 486, Acts of 1906 50,000 00 

Purification of Mystic River, Alewife Brook, and adjacent water-courses, ponds and drain- 
age areas, chapter 529, Acts of 1906 . . 100,000 00 

Additional appropriation for purification of Mystic River, etc., chapter 529, Acts of 1907 25,000 00 

Mystic River and Winthrop Shore Acts, chapter 652, Acts of 1908 70,000 00 

Charles River Land Act, chapter 628, Acts of 1910, and chapter 439, Acts of 1911 . . 143,043 96 

Alewife Brook Purification Act, chapter 458, Acts of 1911 15,000 00 

Work for unemployed, chapter 4, General Acts of 1915 50,000 00 

Weston Bridge Act, chapter 368, Special Acts of 1915 50,000 00 

$8,193,043 96 

To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 1900, chapter 311, Acts of 1897 $900,000 00 

Total amount of loans $9,093,043 96 

Amounts received from sales of buildings, receipts from bath-houses, fines, etc. . . 198,942 81 

Total $9,291,986 77 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Original boulevard, chapter 288, Acts of 1894 $500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 472, Acts of 1896 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 521, Acts of 1897 1,000,000 00 

Saugus Bridge Act, Chapter 547, Acts of 1898 100,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 428, Acts of 1899 500,000 00 

Mattapan Bridge Act, chapter 443, Acts of 1900 75,000 00 

Winchester Act, chapter 444, Acts of 1900 50,000 00 

Revere Beach Parkway Act, chapter 445, Acts of 1900 . . ' 200,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 172, Acts of 1902 450,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 359, Acts of 1903 110,000 00 

Continuing appropriation, chapter 419, Acts of 1903 1,500,000 00 

Alewife Brook and Fresh Pond Parkway Act, chapter 651, Acts of 1908 .... 50,000 00 

Continuing appropriation, chapter 699, Acts of 1912 1,000,000 00 

Wellington Bridge Act, chapter 794, Acts of 1914 115,000 00 

Work for unemployed, chapter 5, Special Acts of 1915 50,000 00 

Alewife Brook Parkway construction, chapter 243, General Acts of 1915 .... 35,000 00 

Neponset Bridge Act, chapter 300, General Acts of 1915 350,000 00 

Wellington Bridge Act, chapter 178, General Acts of 1916 11,000 00 

Improvement of lands in Arlington, chapter 186, General Acts of 1916 .... 20,000 00 
Parkway connecting Blue Hills Reservation and Granite Street, Braintree, chapter 235, 

General Acts of 1916 .... . 10,000 00 

Construction of Dedham Parkway, chapter 237, General Acts of 1916 ..... 10,000 00 
Additional appropriation for Neponset Bridge construction, chapter 220, General Acts of 

1917 .... 100,000 00 

Settlement of claims for land, Furaace Brook Parkway, chapter 316, General Acts of 1917 8,000 00 

Completion of boulevards and roadways, chapter 175, General Acts of 1919 . . . 250,000 00 
Additional appropriation for Neponset Bridge construction, chapter 238, General Acts of 

1919 170,000 00 

Additional appropriation for Neponset Bridge construction, chapter 380, Acts of 1922 . 280,000 00 

Completion of Old Colony Parkway, Chapter 365, Acts of 1923 1,675,000 00 

Completion of Furnace Brook Parkway, chapter 366, Acts of 1923 ..... 135,000 00 

Deficiency of Neponset Bridge, chapter 211, Acts of 1925 50,000 00 

$9,304,000 00 

To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 1900, chapter 311, Acts of 1917 $100,000 00 

Total amount of loans $9,404,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc 29,934 16 

Total $9,433,934 16 



P. D. 48 53 

Nantasket Beach Loan 

Appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1899 $600,000 00 

Appropriation, chapter 456, Acts of 1901 100,000 00 

Total amount of loans $700,000 00 

Receipts from rents, etc 5,881 50 

Total $705,881 50 

Charles River Basin Loan 

Bonds issued for 1904 $250,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1905 400,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1906 600,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1907 1,150,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1908 400,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1909 , 850,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1910 475,000 00 

Bonds issued for 1911 ... 300,000 00 

Appropriation, chapter 539, Acts of 1913 . . 40,000 00 

Driveway, Brooks Street to Charlesbank Road, chapter 188, General Acts of 1915 . . 35,000 00 

Total amount of bonds $4,500,000 00 

Receipts added to loan 9,368 91 

Total $4,509,368 91 

Charles River Bridges Loan 

Western Avenue — Arsenal Street bridge, chapter 497, Acts of 1921 $175,000 00 

Western Avenue bridge, chapter 497, Acts of 1921 275,000 00 

River Street— Brighton Street bridge, chapter 497, Acts of 1921 275,000 00 

Brookline Street — Essex Street — Cottage Farm bridge, chapter 497, Acts of 1921 . . 750,000 00 

Cottage Farm bridge, additional, chapter 416, Acts of 1924 350,000 00 

$1,825,000 00 
Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Loan 
Chapter 442, Acts of 1924 $600,000 00 

Northern Traffic Route Loan 
Chapter 489, Acts of 1924 $2,400,000 00 

Expenditures From Loans 

The following tables show the total amount expended in each of the fore- 
going loans, the total cost of each reservation and parkway to December 1, 
1925, and the amount charged by the Auditor's department to meet the 
sinking fund and interest requirements previous to January 1, 1900. The 
item of "Miscellaneous" in these tables includes cost of construction of roads, 
buildings and of all other work of construction, and all other charges against 
these loans except those for land, general expenses, sinking fund and cost 
of maintenance required by law to be charged to loans up to 1897. The total 
charges for maintenance to 1897, general expenses and sinking fund are given 
separately at the end of the tables. The amounts expended from these loans 
for the fiscal year ending November 30, 1925, are stated in tables on pages 57, 
58 and 59. The total amounts charged to those loans are as follows : — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 

Land $5,395,998 66 

Miscellaneous, including construction of roads, buildings, etc 3,395,496 69 

General expense . 163,371 12 

Maintenance to January 1, 1897, sinking fund assessments to January 1, 1900, and in- 
terest 290,326 56 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan 3,601 10 

$9,248,794 13 
Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Land $2,397,194 15 

Miscellaneous, including construction of roads, buildings, etc 5,853,070 87 

General expense 107,136 99 

Sinking fund assessments to January 1, 1900, and one-half interest 59,195 89 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan 5,209 92 

$8,421,807 82 
Nantasket Beach Loan 

Land $603,329 57 

Miscellaneous, including construction of buildings, etc 102,551 93 

$705,881 50 
Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Loan 
Reconstruction $488,285 73 

Northern Traffic Route Loan 

Land $91,398 43 

Miscellaneous 27,184 18 

$118,582 61 



54 P. D. 48 

Expenditures to December 1, 1925 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 
Blue Hills Reservation: 

Land $363,357 29 

Miscellaneous 307,058 66 

$670,415 95 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Land $691,212 69 

Miscellaneous 294,557 47 

985,770 16 

Revere Beach Reservation: 

Land $1,162,947 67 

Miscellaneous 800,999 04 

1,963; 946 71 

Stony Brook Reservation: 

Land ' . $281,243 87 

Miscellaneous 76,810 67 

358,054 54 

Beaver Brook Reservation: 

Land $29,819 29 

Miscellaneous 24,437 35 

54,256 64 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation: 

Land $53,254 00 

Miscellaneous 15,543 94 

68,797 94 

Charles River Reservation: 

Land $1,584,041 51 

Miscellaneous 341,121 33 

1,925,162 84 

Neponset River Reservation: 

Land . . $233,473 04 

Miscellaneous 46,418 97 

279,892 01 

Mystic River Reservation: 

Land $245,233 21 

Miscellaneous 380,830 51 

626,063 72 

Lynn Shore Reservation: 

Land $361,199 29 

Miscellaneous 243,580 01 

604,779 30 

Quincy Shore Reservation: 

Land $73,726 26 

Miscellaneous . . - . . . 198,160 63 

271,886.89 

Winthrop Shore Reservation: 

Land $51,067 32 

Miscellaneous 170,560 99 

221,628 31 

Hart's Hill Reservation: 

Land $10,000 00 

Miscellaneous 202 35 

10,202 35 

King's Beach Reservation: 

Land $24,297 21 

Miscellaneous 1,551 63 

25,848 84 

West Roxbury Parkway: 

Land $244,976 01 

Miscellaneous 8,313 67 

253,289 68 

Wellington Bridge: 

Miscellaneous $185,317 42 

185,317 42 

Nahant Beach Bath-house: 

Miscellaneous $67,794 58 

67,794 58 

Boylston Street Bridge: 

Miscellaneous ■ . $45,838 57 

45,838 57 

Alewife Brook Purification: 

Miscellaneous $136,398 90 

136,398 90 

Weston Bridge: 

Miscellaneous $50,000 00 

50,000 00 

General expense 163,486 12 

$8,968,831 47 

Sinking fund requirements to 1896 $18,980 18 

Care and maintenance to July 1, 1896 85,813 46 

Care and maintenance, July 1, 1896, to January 1, 1897 . . . 19,604 06 

Sinking fund assessment for 1897 63,630 70 

Sinking fund assessment for 1898 9,755 55 

Sinking fund assessment for 1899 64,224 00 

Interest 28,318 61 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan (unexpended balance Alewife Brook 

purification appropriation) 3,601 10 

293,927 66 

Total charged to December 1, 1925 $9,262,759 13 

Balance December 1, 1925 29,227 64 

$9,291,986 77 



P. D. 48 55 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 
Blue Hills Parkway: 

Land 

Miscellaneous 



Middlesex Fells Parkway: 

Land 

Miscellaneous 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 



Revere Beach Parkway: 

Land 

Miscellaneous 869,565 65 1,407,011 16 



Neponset River Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Fresh Pond Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Furnace Brook Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Nahant Beach Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Lynn Fells Parkway : 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Winthrop Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Charles River Speedway: 
Miscellaneous 

Blue Hills Roads: 
Miscellaneous 

Middlesex Fells Roads: 
Miscellaneous 

Stony Brook Roads: 
Miscellaneous 

Lynnway: 

Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Spy Pond Parkway: 
Miscellaneous 

Old Colony Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Woburn Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Dedham Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Hammond Pond Parkway: 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

Quannapowitt Parkway : 
Land .... 
Miscellaneous 

West Roxbury Parkway: 
Miscellaneous 

Vose's Grove: 
Miscellaneous 

Wellington Bridge: 
Miscellaneous 



$133,505 02 
269,513 47 


$263,687 60 
613,667 39 


$204,703 91 
426,421 06 


$537,445 51 
869,565 65 


$83,941 75 
36,100 54 


$44,086 25 
31,635 58 


$173,897 77 
404,018 19 


$80,940 78 
76,260 11 


$40,468 46 
126,373 84 


$134,090 73 
90,011 11 


$144,497 74 
45,705 13 


$521,348 66 


$8,742 06 


$79,444 42 


$37,183 45 


$20,500 00 
124,368 29 


$89.04 


$391,866 02 
845,058 10 


$4,608 75 
52,038 32 


$22,027 01 
34,322 88 


$94,965 85 
5,061 45 


$6,961 00 
1,831 82 


$57,420 97 


$980 08 


$120,796 40 



$403,018 49 
877,354 99 
631,124 97 



120,042 29 

75,721 83 

577,915 96 

157,200 89 

166,842 30 

224,101 84 

190,202 87 

521,348 66 

8,742 06 

79,444 42 

37,183 45 

144,868 29 
89.04 

1,236,924 12 

56,647 07 

56,349 89 

100,027 30 

8,792 82 

57,420 97 

980 08 

120,796 40 



56 

Neponset Bridge: 
Land 
Miscellaneous 

Arlington Parkway: 
Miscellaneous 

Nonantum Road: 
Miscellaneous 



P. D. 48 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II — Concluded 



West Street, Braintree: 
Miscellaneous 



General expense 



Sinking fund requirements for 1896 
Sinking fund requirements for 1897 
Sinking fund requirements for 1898 
Sinking fund requirements for 1899 
One-half interest .... 
Transfer to Serial Bond Loan 



Total charged to December 1, 1925 
Balance December 1, 1925 . 



Land 
Miscellaneous 



Nantasket Beach Loan 



Total charged to December 1, 1925 



Charles River Basin Loan 



Expended from beginning of work to December 1, 1925 
The above amount has been distributed as follows: — 

Administration 

Dam 

Lock 

Temporary bridge and approaches 

Drawbridge . 

Highway . 

Dredging, pile-driving and protection work in Basin 

Broad Canal 

Lechmere Canal 

Boston embankment 

Boston marginal conduit 

Cambridge marginal conduit 

Elimination of malarial mosquitoes 

Landing piers 

Float anchorage 

Police signal system 

Improvement of south bank and driveway 

Service sheds 

Mortuary 

Otter Street widening 

Landing near Faneuil Station 

Alterations and improvements in stable and stable yard 

Shelters 

Rent of land 

Maintenance 



Cottage Farm Bridge: 
Miscellaneous 
Balance December 1, 1925 



Charles River Bridges Loan 



Western Avenue — Arsenal Street Bridge: 

Miscellaneous 

Balance, December 1, 1925 



Western Avenue Bridge: 

Miscellaneous . . . 

Balance, December 1, 1925 

River Street — Brighton Street Bridge: 
Miscellaneous . . . 

Balance, December 1, 1925 



Receipts .... 

Expenditures . 

Balance, December, 1, 1925 



Metropolitan Parks Trust Fund 



Receipts .... 
Balance December 1, 1925 



Edwin U. Curtis Memorial 



$15,000 00 
928,068 06 



$4,035 12 


$943,068 06 

4,035 12 

41,271 43 

1,738 25 
107,136 99 


$41,271 43 


$1,738 25 


$3,650 03 
14,057 10 

3,765 08 
15,396 00 
22,327 68 

5,209 92 


$8,357,402 01 

ft.4 Af\K fil 



$603,329 
102,551 



57 
93 



$108,225 

1,118,772 

724,142 

184,895 

100,371 

55,557 

179,881 

117,251 

53,388 

895,213 

635,511 

99,472 

1,173 

7,667 

23 

9,847 

31,506 

19,198 

1,560 

34,762 

1,057 

2,052 

2,615 

2 

88,708 



16 
60 
64 
36 
06 
85 
35 
64 
87 
92 
96 
48 
68 
99 
90 
56 
09 
95 
66 
82 
83 
15 
19 
00 
51 



$125,270 96 
974,729 04 



$138,693 49 
36,306 51 



$274,828 30 
171 70 



$197,148 68 
77,851 32 



$40,776 92 
38,106 50 



$1,374 40 



$8,421,807 82 
1,012,126 34 

$9,433,934 16 



$705,881 50 



$4,472,862 22 



$4,472,862 22 



$1,100,000^00 
175,000 00 
275,000 00 
275,000 00 

2,670 42 
1,374 40 



P. D. 48 



57 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 

Receipts added to loan before June 1, 1901 



General Expense: 

Bond Book .... 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 
Land 



DETAILED STATEMENT 
Expenditures December 1, 1924, to December 1, 1925 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 



Expenditures 



$60 00 
50 00 



Amounts charged to December 1, 1925 



$110 00 
9,262,649 13 



Balance December 1, 1925 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Receipts from sales, etc 



Furnace Brook Parkway: 

Construction : 

Contract, A. G. Tomasello & Son 
Labor and materials . 



Expenditures 



$23,903 15 
1,801 03 



Moving tracks . . . 

Old Colony Parkway: 

Construction : 

Contracts: 

Jas. H. Fannon 

Bay State Dredging Company 

Coleman Bros., Inc. 

John W. O'Connell. 



$25,704 18 
1,709 47 



$27,413 65 



Labor and materials 



Engineering : 

Services 
Expenses 



$45,991 76 

290,181 83 

39,461 25 

5,118 71 

$380,753 55 
136,227 82 



$17,339 09 
651 30 



Lighting . 
Advertising 
Printing contract 
Consulting engineers 
Miscellaneous . 



$516,981 37 



17,990 39 

682 60 

194 70 

78 15 

175 00 

2 55 



Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Land 

Neponset Bridge: 
Construction: 

Contract, Crandall Eng. Co. 
Labor and materials . 



536,104 76 



713 00 



$61,992 75 
4,136 44 



Rental of land 
Engineering: 

Expenses 



$66,129 19 
375 00 

423 09 



66,927 28 



Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 



$631,158 69 
7,790,649 13 



$9,093,043 96 
198,942 81 

$9,291,986 77 



9,262,759 13 
$29,227 64 



$9,404,000 00 
29,934 16 

$9,433,934 16 



Balance December 1, 1925 



Northern Traffic Route Loan 
Appropriation (chapter 489, Acts of 1924) 



8,421,807 82 
$1,012,126 34 

$1,800,000 00 



Land 

Engineering: 
Services 
Expenses 



Expenditures 



$9,514 58 
322 89 



Legal 

Claims 



Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 



$89,763 43 



9,837 47 
9,508 15 
4,450 00 

$113,559 05 
5,023 56 



118,582 61 



Balance December 1, 1925 $1,681,417 39 



58 P. D. 48 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Loan 
Appropriation (chapter 442, Acts of 1924) $600,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, V. James Grande $115,628 71 

Labor and materials 13,965 56 

$129,594 27 

Engineering: 

Services $1,745 52 

Expenses 171 26 

1,916 78 

Lighting 383 82 

Consulting engineers 875 00 

Installation of electric lighting system 813 50 



$133,583 37 
Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 354,702 36 



Expenditures 
Construction: 

Labor and materials $15,961 47 

Engineering: 

Services $1,373 85 

Expenses 42 35 

1,416 20 

Lighting . 502 26 

Consulting engineers 503 00 

Labor 5,629 50 

$24,012 43 
Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 . 101,258 53 



$133,296 50 
Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 5,396 99 



$64,725 49 
Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 210,102 81 



488,285 73 



Balance December 1, 1925 $111,714 27 

Charles River Bridges Loan 

Brookline Street- Essex Street- Cottage Farm Bridge Loan 

Appropriation (chapter 497, Acts of 1921 $750,000 00 

(chapter 416, Acts of 1924 350,000 00 



$1,100,000 00 



125,270 96 



Balance December 1, 1925 $974,729 04 

Western Avenue - Arsenal Street Bridge Loan 
Appropriation (chapter 497, Acts of 1921) $175,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, V. James Grande $126,548 55 

Labor and materials 76 44 

$126,624 99 

Engineering: 

Services $5,455 65 

Expenses 126 02 

5,581 67 

Lighting 139 84 

Consulting engineers 950 00 



138,693 49 



Balance December 1, 1925 $36,306 51 

Western Avenue Bridge Loan 
Appropriation (chapter 497, Acts of 1921) $275,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, T. Stuart & Son Co $62,379 42 

Labor and materials 54 42 

$62,433 84 

Engineering: 

Services $834 55 

Expenses 16 38 

850 93 

Lighting 642 04 

Installation of electric lighting system 798 68 



274,828 30 



Balance December 1, 1925 $171 70 



P. D. 48 59 

River Street - Brighton Street Bridge Loan 
Appropriation (chapter 497, Acts of 1921) $275,000 00 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Luke S. White, Inc $179,826 26 



Engineering: 

Services . $5,695 97 

Expenses 43 79 



5,739 76 



Advertising 285 39 

Consulting engineers 550 00 



$186,401 41 
Amounts charged to December 1, 1924 . • 10,747 27 



197,148 68 



Balance December 1, 1925 $77,851 32 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, GENERAL 
Appropriation December 1, 1924, to December 1, 1925 $778,395 38 

Expenditures 
General expense: 
Police: 

Payrolls $191,097 21 

Miscellaneous 32,165 13 



$223,262 34 



Salaries: 

Commissioners ...... $2,500 00 

Secretary and clerks '. 8,428 35 

Engineering department .... 15,677 29 

26,605 64 

Rent, care and lighting of building 4,499 98 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General office $4,971 00 

Engineering department .... 1,237 93 

6,208 93 

Pensions and annuities 20,606 30 



$281,183 19 



Blue Hills Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $32,898 85 

Moth work 27,344 06 

Road repairs 12,587 10 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $14,761 99 

Moth work 181 42 

Road repairs 1,348 55 



Stony Brook Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $3,856 36 

Moth work 3,803 10 

Road repairs 399 41 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,975 94 

Road repairs 344 83 



Neponset River Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

Moth work $2,155 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 88 62 



$72,830 01 



16,291 96 



89,121 97 



$8,058 87 



2,320 77 



10,379 64 



$2,243 62 



Quincy Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $10,788 83 

Road repairs 157 10 



10 945 93 

Street lighting 3, 041 64 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,547 63 

Road repairs 106 32 

1,653 95 



15,641 52 



60 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General — Continued 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $42,570 11 

Moth work 25,678 63 

Road repairs 6,816 02 

$75,064 76 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $18,971 68 

Moth work 2,564 17 

Road repairs 980 36 

22,516 21 

$97,580 97 

Mystic River Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $12,345 11 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 2,327 16 

14,672 27 

Revere Beach Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $42,378 42 

Road repairs 79 68 

$42,458 10 

Street lighting 7,803 14 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 11,545 73 

61,806 97 

Lynn Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6,845 78 

Road repairs 442 58 

$7,288 36 

Street lighting 2,520 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,918 78 

Road repairs 65 56 

1,984 34 

11,792 70 

Winthrop Shore Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General. . . '. . . . $5,387 51 

Road repairs 422 47 

$5,809 98 

Street lighting 665 28 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,696 86 

Road repairs 313 02 

2,009 88 

8,485 14 

Charles River Upper Division: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $45,155 81 

Moth work 3,128 11 

Road repairs 805 83 

$49,089 75 

Street lighting 1,471 56 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $17,863 18 

Road repairs 1,789 77 

19,652 95 

70,214 26 

Riverside Recreation Grounds: 

Labor and teaming: 

General. . $4,539 60 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General. . . . . . . $2,577 41 

Road repairs 35 95 

2,613 36 

7,152 96 

Beaver Brook Reservation: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $2,122 76 

Moth work 976 50 

$3,099 26 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 961 09 

4,060 35 

Cambridge Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $28,235 05 

Moth work 271 45 

Road repairs 2,112 35 

$30,618 85 



P. D, 48 61 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General — Concluded 

Street lighting $3,858 87 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $12,584 65 

Road repairs 5,228 05 

17,812 70 

$52,290 42 

$726,625 98 

Balance December 1, 1925 $51,769 40 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND — SPECIALS 

Band Concerts 
Appropriation $20,000 00 

Expenditures 
Advertising $29 80 

Bands: 

Blue Hills Division $980 00 

Middlesex Fells Division 2,862 70 

Revere Beach Division 3,857 50 

Charles River Upper Division 2,791 04 

Nantasket Beach Division 9,147 52 

19,638 76 

19,668 56 

Balance December 1, 1925 $331 44 

Clearing Woods 

Appropriation (amount approved for Workmen's Compensation Act) .... $2,883 86 

Expended to December 1, 1924 694 72 

$2,189 14 
Expenditures 
Industrial accident compensation 677 85 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,511 29 

Westerly Border Road, West Roxburt Parkway 

Appropriation (Chapter 353, Acts of 1924) . . $40,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 28,129 59 

$11,870 41 
Expenditures 
Construction : 

Contract, James H. Fannon $5,528 29 

Engineering: 

Salaries $651 00 

Expenses 49 74 

700 74 

6,229 03 

Balance December 1, 1925 $5,641 38 

Nahant Beach Playground 

Appropriation (Chapter 430, Acts of 1924) $5,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 2,651 28 

$2,348 72 
Expenditures 
Playground apparatus 381 22 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,967 50 

Improvement of Land adjoining Alewife Brook 
Appropriation (Chapter 247, Acts of 1925) $3,000 00 

Expenditures 
Improvements : 

Labor $1,690 08 

Materials 1,004 80 

2,694 88 

Balance December 1, 1925 $305 12 

Eliot Circle, Revere Street Roadway 

Appropriation (Chapter 432, Acts of 1924) $90,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 26,633 05 

$63,366 95 



62 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund — Specials — Concluded 

Expenditures 
Construction: 

Contract, Simpson Bros. Corporation $50,012 56 

Engineering: . 

Salaries $1,137 07 

Expenses 61 75 

1,198 82 



$51,211 38 



Balance December 1, 1925 $12,155 57 

Electric Lighting System, Revere Beach 

Appropriation (Chapter 362, Acts of 1924) $50,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 



Expenditures 

Wire, cables and conduits $19,559 75 

Ornamental posts, lamps, etc 13,945 73 

Engineering: 

Salaries $337 35 

Expenses 11 42 

348 77 



$50,000 00 



33,854 25 



Balance December 1, 1925 $16,145 75 

Reconstruction op Roadway from Brookline Street to Massachusetts Avenue 
Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925) . $33,200 00 

Expenditures 

Advertising $68 78 

Construction: 

Contract, Reynolds Bros., Inc $31,865 11 



Labor and materials 203 59 



Engineering: 

Salaries $1,046 72 

Expenses 15 80 



32,068 70 
1,062 52 



33,200 00 



Acquiring Land of Lawrence Estate 
Appropriation (Chapter 324, Acts of 1925) $160,000 00 

Expenditures 
Land 160.000 00 

Investigation, Spring Street, Dedham 
Appropriation (Chapter 14, Resolves of 1925) $500 00 

Expenditures 

Engineering: „ _ 

Salaries 493 35 

Balance December 1, 1925 $6 65 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND, BOULEVARDS — GENERAL 

Appropriation, December 1, 1924, to December 1, 1925 $421,000 00 

Expenditures 
General expense: 
Police" 
Payrolls $84,286 94 



Miscellaneous 8,669 89 



$92,956 83 



Salaries: 

Commissioners fn'fS!? o? 

Secretary and clerks t^'ilt no 

Engineering department .... l/,l4d w ^ ^ 

Rent, care and lighting of building 2,223 68 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General office Sf,901 21 

Engineering department .... l^oisy 



6,166 10 



$131,664 64 



Blue Hills Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6 ' 4 fUn 

Moth work 45 50 



$6,529 01 



Street lighting 2 » 867 36 



P. D. 48 63 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — General — Continued 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $877 63 

Road repairs 15 77 

$893 40 

$10,289 77 

Neponset River Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $1,332 00 

Moth work 22 75 

1,354 75 

Furnace Brook Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6,183 30 

Road repairs 940 75 

$7,124 05 

Street lighting 3,223 69 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $984 29 

Road repairs 170 50 

1,154 79 

11,502 53 

West Roxbury Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $809 84 

Moth work 841 95 

$1,651 79 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 74 42 

1,726 21 

Old Colony Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $3,757 95 - 

Moth work 168 35 

Road repairs 110 12 

$4,036 42 

Street lighting 1,449 63 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $273 00 

Road repairs 381 15 

654 15 

6,140 20 

Dedham Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

Road repairs $468 52 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

Road repairs 552 03 

1.020 55 

Neponset Bridge: 

General labor $7,741 45 

Street lighting 1,328 07 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses . . . 1,199 70 

10,269 22 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $23,091 88 

Moth work 357 68 

Road repairs 6,325 28 

$29,774 84 

Street lighting 13,778 54 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $8,487 61 

Road repairs 1,831 52 

10,319 13 

53,872 51 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $19,463 84 

Moth work 797 44 

Road repairs 2,542 20 

$22,803 48 

Street lighting 5,840 79 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $4,654 24 

Road repairs 3,077 51 

7,731 75 

36,376 02 

Lynn Fells Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $5,916 30 

Moth work 40 09 

Road repairs 264 82 

$6,221 21 

Street lighting 885 92 



64 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parka Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — General — Continued 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,529 58 

Road repairs 132 56 

$1,662 14 

$8,769 27 

Middlesex Fells Roads: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $6,565 26 

Road repairs 3,037 14 

$9,602 40 

Street lighting 2,804 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $2,015 41 

Road repairs 318 82 

2,334 23 

14,740 63 

Woburn Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General. . . . ' . . . . $4,313 96 

Moth work 261 09 

Road repairs 46 50 

$4,621 55 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1,254 55 

5,876 10 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: 

General $12,337 44 

Moth work 562 95 

Road repairs 401 85 

$13,302 24 

Street lighting 817 23 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $3,019 75 

Moth work 22 61 

Road repairs 102 33 

3,144 69 

17,264 16 

Revere Beach Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $28,489 83 

Moth work 133 82 

Road repairs 1,754 85 

$30,378 50 

Street lighting 10,336 56 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $5,658 75 

Moth work 12 34 

Road repairs 1,553 72 

7,224 81 

47,939 87 

Nahant Beach Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General . . $6,159 77 

Moth work 40 09 

$6,199 86 

Street lighting 980 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 181 39 

7,361 25 

Winthrop Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $2,060 10 

Road repairs 94 50 

$2,154 60 

Street lighting 1,468 51 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 1 03 

3,624 14 

Lynnway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $10,170 39 

Road repairs 272 12 

$10,442 51 

Street lighting 231 33 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $1,572 42 

Road repairs 120 19 

1,692 61 

12,366 45 



P. D. 48 65 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards —General — Concluded 

Hammond Pond Parkway: 

Labor and teaming: 

General $1,224 00 

Moth work 1,476 00 

$2,700 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General 87 46 

$2,787 46 

Fresh Pond Parkway: 
Labor and teaming: * 

General $1,803 00 

Moth work 272 40 

Road repairs 324 00 

$2 399 40 

Street lighting 330 00 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $473 68 

Moth work 3 82 

Road repairs 315 67 

793 17 

3,522 57 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge: 

General labor $1,863 00 

Street lighting 1,722 63 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses . . . 266 36 

3,851 99 

$392,320 29 

Balance December 1, 1925 $28,679 71 

METROPOLITAN PARKS MAINTENANCE FUND. BOULEVARDS — SPECIALS 

Blue Hill River Road 

Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925) . . • $75,000 00 

No expenditures . 

Balance December 1, 1925 $75,000 00 

Sidewalks, Blue Hills Parkway 

Appropriation (Chapter 126, Acts of 1924) $6,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 1,006 88 

$4,993 12 
Expenditures 

Contract, John A. McCarthy 734 16 

Balance December 1, 1925 $4,258 96 

Stoneham-Wakefield Parkwat 
Appropriation (Chapter 409, Acts of 1924) $5,000 00 

Expenditures 
Engineering: 

Salaries $550 10 

Expenses 2 40 

$552 50 

Labor 135 00 

687 50 

Balance December 1, 1925 $4,312 50 

Boulevard, Hyde Park District 

Appropriation (Chapter 370, Acts of 1924) $10,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 8,49937 

$1,500 63 
Expenditures 

Contract, Frank Williams $1,479 55 

Engineering: 

Expense 7 68 

1,487 23 

Balance December 1, 1925 $13 40 

Installation Electric Lighting System 
Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925) $50,000 00 

Expenditures 

Wire, cables and conduits $17,611 90 

Ornamental posts, lamps, etc 15,736 60 

33,348 50 

Balance December 1, 1925 $16,651 50 



66 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards — Specials — Concluded 

Boulevard, Boston and Brookline 
Appropriation (Chapter 313, Acts of 1925) $222,000 00 

Engineering: Expenditures 

Salaries $1,789 42 

Expenses 64 52 

$1,853 94 

Balance December 1, 1925 $220,146 06 

Resurfacing Boulevards and Parkways 
Appropriation (Chapter 211, Acts of 1925) $200,000 00 

Blue Hills Parkway: Expenditures 

Advertising $38 40 

Construction: 

Contract, A. W. Loud 9,005 49 

Engineering: 

Expenses 27 90 

$9,071 79 

Furnace Brook Parkway: 

Advertising $137 60 

Construction: 

Contract, A. W. Loud .... $20,966 70 
Contract, E. C. Sargent .... 38,729 89 

Labor and materials 754 65 

60,451 24 

Engineering: 

Salaries $2,179 73 

Expenses 82 23 

2,261 96 

62,850 80 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 

Advertising $195 45 

Construction: 

Contract, Coleman Bros $31,042 84 

Contract, Jas. H. Fannon . . . 20,917 24 

Contract, Rowe Cont. Co. . . . 31,069 43 

Labor and materials 2,310 07 

85,339 58 

Engineering: 

Salaries $2,670 58 

Expenses 120 42 

2,791 00 

88,326 03 

Revere Beach Parkway: 

Advertising $51 11 

Construction: 

Contract, Rowe Cont. Co. . . . $4,433 21 

Labor and materials 5,136 04 

9,569 25 

Engineering: 

Salaries $194 46 

Expenses 7 50 

201 96 

9,822 32 

170,070 94 

Balance December 1, 1925 $29,929 06 

CHARLES RIVER BASIN MAINTENANCE 
Appropriation $208,500 00 

Park and Water Areas: Expenditures 

Police: 

Payrolls $57,893 54 

Miscellaneous 7,572 84 

$65,466 38 

Labor and teaming: 

General 37,398 76 

Street lighting 4,049 51 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $12,489 32 

Road repairs 71 17 

12,560 49 

$119,475 14 

Locks, Gates and Drawbridges: 

General labor $73,724 18 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses .... 14,003 94 

87,728 12 

207,203 26 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,296 74 



P. D. 48 67 

NANTASKET BEACH MAINTENANCE 
Appropriation $80,500 00 

Expenditures 
Police: 

Payrolls 823,442 71 

Miscellaneous 5,250 71 

$28,693 42 

Labor and teaming: 

General $34,782 37 

Road repairs 3,197 10 

37 979 47 

Street lighting 1,294 41 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses: 

General $10,699 83 

Road Repairs 1,687 34 

12,387 17 

80,354 47 

Balance December 1, 1925 $145 53 

WELLINGTON BRIDGE MAINTENANCE 
Appropriation $17,000 00 

Expenditures 

General labor $11,772 95 

Street lighting 2,002 84 

General supplies and miscellaneous expenses 2,265 32 

16,041 11 

Balance December 1, 1925 $958 89 

BUNKER HILL MAINTENANCE 
Appropriation $10,500 00 

Expenditures 
Police: 

Payrolls $3,954 58 

Miscellaneous 200 61 

$4,155 19 

Labor and teaming: 

General $4,335 85 

Moth work 55 20 

4,391 05 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenese: 

General 991 24 

9,537 48 

Balance December 1, 1925 $962 52 

METROPOLITAN PARKS EXPENSE FUND 

Receipts, December 1, 1924, to December 1, 1926 
Bath-houses: 

Revere Beach: 

Sale of bath tickets $32,639 10 

Miscellaneous 668 16 

$33,307 26 

Nantasket Beach : 

Sale of bath tickets $18,233 70 

Miscellaneous 3,548 54 

21,782 24 

Nahant Beach: 

Sale of bath tickets $10,487 85 

Miscellaneous 82 51 

10,570 36 

Magazine Beach: 

Sale of bath tickets $2,707 45 

Miscellaneous 162 50 

— 2,869 95 

Blue Hills: 

Sale of bath tickets $416 70 

Miscellaneous 1 00 

417 70 



Rentals: 

Buildings $37,027 39 

Land 4,814 66 

Ducts 1,692 65 

Locations 1,246 48 

Houses 1,171 68 

Miscellaneous 1 00 



$68,947 51 



45,953 86 



68 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Continued 
Sales: 

Wood $4,208 43 

Old metal, rags, etc 1,075 72 

Hay and grass 495 00 

Land 310 00 

Miscellaneous 343 40 

$6,432 55 

Income from securities 11,128 13 

Court fines 10,782 00 

Privileges 9,262 50 

City of Quincy, account Black's Creek Dam . . 7,500 00 

Construction of terminal houses 6,865 15 

Police services 6,050 73 

Sidewalk and entrance construction 2,458 85 

Boat hire 878 20 

Damage to property, reimbursements 631 17 

Miscellaneous 413 13 



Expenditures, December 1, 1924, to December 1, 1925 

General Expense: 

Interest $2,426 10 

Miscellaneous 122 92 

Police: 

Repairs $266 56 

Police services 195 89 



$177,303 78 



$2,549 02 



462 45 



358 88 



Engineering: 

Miscellaneous 138 15 

Blue Hills Reservation: 

Repairs to houses $229 23 

Bath house expense 21 19 

250 42 

Stony Brook Reservation: 

Repairs to houses, etc 33 14 

Quincy Shore Reservation: 
Miscellaneous . . . 119 83 

Blue Hills Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Contract, J. A. McCarthy $179 62 

Refunds 179 26 

Black's Creek Dam: 

Advertising $48 15 

Construction: 

Contract, W. A. Norton Co $13,473 92 

Labor and materials 1,775 57 

15,249 49 

Engineering expense 8 15 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: 

City of Medford, taxes $1,343 57 

Miscellaneous 138 52 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $1,345 88 

Refunds 216 85 

$1,562 73 

Excavating 1,312 50 

Mystic Valley Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Cost $91 40 

Refunds 18 84 



15,305 79 



1,482 09 



2,875 23 



110 24 



Lynn Fells Parkway: 

Sidewalk and entrance construction: 

Refunds 148 32 

Alewife Brook Parkway: 
Entrance construction: 
Cost 55 19 

Revere Beach Reservation: 

Bath-house: 

Payrolls $26,013 79 

Alterations and repairs 16,086 61 



P. D. 48 69 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Continued 

Bathing suits $2,760 20 

Stockings 240 10 

Towels 262 39 

Findings 43 45 

Neck bands and keys 321 30 

Bathing caps 132 30 

Coal 1,414 52 

Lighting 762 96 

Engine-room 501 05 

Paint, hardware and lumber 96 24 

Stationery . 272 31 

Telephones 43 37 

Tickets 46 73 

Medicines and attendance 75 72 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses .... 1,057 89 

$50,130 93 

Entrance construction: 

Cost $230 25 

Refunds 4 45 

234 70 

Advertising 85 55 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 63 00 



Winthrop Shore Reservation: 

Entrance construction: 

Cost $24 75 

Refund 9 22 



$50,514 18 



33 97 



Revere Beach Parkway: 
Entrance construction: 

Cost 45 00 

Nahant Beach Parkway: 

Bath-house: 

Payrolls $7,733 06 

Alterations and repairs 11,808 71 

Stockings 120 05 

Towels 172 05 

Findings 8 83 

Neck bands and keys 114 33 

Lighting 178 27 

Engine-room 29 09 

Hardware, lumber and paint 220 68 

Telephones 114 97 

Tickets, etc 21 80 

Medicines and attendance . 4 36 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 682 45 

21,208 65 

Charles River Upper Division: 

Altering stable for headquarters: 

Advertising $52 65 

Contract, John P. Curley 14,570 75 

Architect's services 1,324 68 

Fittings for new station 1,451 73 

«17 399 gj 

Filling material 28^348 03 

Land 425 00 

Entrance construction: 

Cost $163 50 

Refund 27 50 

191 00 

Miscellaneous 125 40 

46,489 24 

Riverside Recreation Grounds: 
Miscellaneous . 48 40 

Fresh Pond Parkway: 
Labor 3,782 25 

Charles River Lower Basin: 

Magazine Beach Bath-house: 

Payrolls . . . $2,668 54 

Alterations and repairs 463 84 

Towels 72 01 

Neck bands and keys ........ 93 40 

Engine-room 11 14 

Hardware, lumber and paint 67 82 

Stationery • 28 42 

Medicines and attendance 5 93 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses .... 87 69 

$3,498 79 

Miscellaneous 36 37 

3,535 16 



70 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund — Concluded 
Cambridge Parkway: 

Temporary road at Western Avenue: 

Labor and materials $2,747 12 

Miscellaneous 397 57 

83,144 69 

Memorial Drive: 

Labor and materials 2,510 88 

Bunker Hill Monument: 
Alterations and repairs 

Nantasket Beach Reservation: 

Bath-house: 

Payrolls $14,690 44 

Alterations and repairs 3,257 77 

Bathing suits 282 40 

Towels 270 36 

Findings 16 39 

Bathing caps 55 12 

Neck bands and keys 27 99 

Coal 1,357 87 

Lighting 132 05 

Engine-room 341 70 

Hardware, lumber and paint 120 76 

Stationery 29 39 

Telephones 44 10 

Tickets, etc 19 32 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses .... 1,231 25 

$21,876 91 

Alterations and repairs 7,619 08 

METROPOLITAN PARKS TRUST FUND 

Receipts for the year ending November 30, 1925 $103 71 

Receipts for the period prior to December 1, 1924 40,673 21 

Expenditures 
For the period prior to December 1, 1925 

Balance, December 1, 1925 

EDWIN U. CURTIS MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 

Receipts for the year ending November 30, 1925 $40 03 

Receipts for the period prior to December 1, 1925 1,334 37 

GENERAL REVENUE 
Bunker Hill Monument: 

Receipts: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $4,583 10 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 12,097 80 



P. D. 48 



$5,655 57 
2,328 37 



29,495 99 
$187,025 53 

$40,776 92 

38,106 50 
$2,670 42 



$1,374 40 



$16,680 90 



Summary of General Expense for Year Ending Nov. 30, 1925 



* 


Parks 

Maintenance 

Fund, 

General 


Parks 
Maintenance 

Fund, 

Boulevards, 

General 


Parks 

Expense 

Fund 


Parks 
Loan 
Fund 


Totals 


Police 

Rent, Ugh ting and care, Boston office 


$2,500 00 

8,428 35 

15,677 29 

223,262 34 

4,499 98 

6,208 93 


$2,500 00 
10,674 94 
17,143 09 
92,956 83 
2,223 68 
6,166 10 


138 15 
462 45 

2,549 02 


$60 00 


$5,000 00 

19,103 29 

32,958 53 

316,681 62 

6,723 66 

4,984 05 


Totals 


$260,576 89 


$131,664 64 


$3,149 62 


$60 00 


$395,451 15 



P. D. 48 



Summary of Expenditures for Year ending Nov. 30, 1925 



71 





Metro- 
politan 


Metropoli- 
tan Parks 


Metropoli- 


Special Ap- 
propriations, 
Repairs, 
Construc- 
tion and 
Investiga- 








Parks 
Loan 


Maintenance 
Fund, 


tan Parks 
Expense 


Band 
Concerts 


Totals 




Fund 


General 


Fund 














tions 






Reservations: 
Blue Hills . 




$89,121 97 


$250 42 






$89,372 39 


Beaver Brook 


- 


4,060 35 


- 


- 


- 


4,060 35 


Charles River, Upper 














Division . 


— 


70,214 26 


46,489 24 


$493 35 


$985 00 


118,181 85 


Lynn Shore 


— 


11,792 70 


- 


- 


- 


11,792 70 


Middlesex Fells . 


$50 00 


97,580 97 


1,482 09 


160,677 85 


129 60 


259,920 51 


Mystic River 


- 


14,672 27 


- 


- 


- 


14,672 27 


Neponset River . 


— 


2,243 62 


- 


- 


- 


2,243 62 


Quincy Shore 


- 


15,641 52 


119 83 


- 


980 00 


16,741 35 


Revere Beach 


— 


61,806 97 


50,514 18 


85,065 63 


2,180 00 


199,566 78 


Riverside Recreation 














Grounds . 


— 


7,152 96 


48 40 


- 


1,806 04 


9,007 40 


Stony Brook 


— 


10,379 64 


33 14 


- 


- 


10,412 78 


Winthrop Shore 


60 00 


8,485 14 


33 97 


- 


— 


8,519 11 


Cambridge Parkway 


— 


52,290 42 


5,655 57 


33,200 00 


- 


91,145 99 


General expense 


— 


281,183 19 


— 


— 


29 80 


281,272 99 


Totals 


SI 10 00 


$726,625 98 


$104,626 84 


$279,436 83 


$6,110 44 


$1,116,910 09 











Special 
















Appropria- 










Metropoli- 


Metropoli- 


Metropoli- 


tions, 










tan Parks 


tan Parks 


tan Parks 


Repairs, 


Banc 


. 






Loan Fund, 


Mainten- 


Expense 


Construc- 


Concerts 


Totals 




Series II 


ance Fund, 
Boulevards 


Fund 


tion and 
Investiga- 
tion 








Parkways: 
















Alewife Brook 


- 


$17,264 16 


$55 19 


$2,694 88 


- 




$20,014 23 


Blue Hills 


- 


10,289 77 


358 88 


9,805 95 


- 




20,454 60 


Dedham .... 


— 


1,020 55 


- 


— 


- 




1,020 55 


Fresh Pond . 


- 


3,522 57 


3,782 25 


- 


- 




7,304 82 


Furnace Brook 


$27,413 65 


11,502 53 


15,305 79 


62,850 80 


- 




117,072 77 


Hammond Pond 


- 


2,787 46 


- 


— 


- 




2,787 46 


Lynn Fells 


- 


8,769 27 


148 32 


- 


$140 00 


9,057 59 


Lynnway 


- 


12,366 45 


— 


- 


— 




12,366 45 


Middlesex Fells 


— 


53,872 51 


2,875 23 


88,326 03 


1,337 


50 


146,411 27 


Middlesex Fells Roads . 


- 


14,740 63 


— 


— 


— 




14,740 63 


Mystic Valley. 


713 00 


36,376 02 


110 24 


— 


165 


00 


37,364 26 


Nahant Beach 


- 


7,361 25 


21,208 65 


381 22 


1,677 


50 


30,628 62 


Neponset River 


— 


1,354 75 


— 


1,487 23 


— 




2,841 98 


Nonantum Road 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


Old Colony . 


536,104 76 


6,140 20 


— 


— 


— 




542,244 96 


Quannapowitt 
Revere Beach 


— 


— 


— 


— 


875 


00 


875 00 


- 


47,939 87 


45 00 


43,170 82 


— 




91,155 69 


Stoneham-Wakefield 


— 


— 


— 


687 50 


— 




687 50 


West Roxbury 


- 


1,726 21 


— 


8,082 97 


— 




9,809 18 


Winthrop 


- 


3,624 14 


— 


880 33 


— 




3,624 14 


Woburn .... 


— 


5,876 10 


— 


— 


215 


60 


6,091 70 


Mass. Ave. Bridge 


— 


3,851 99 


— 


133,583 37 


- 




137,435 36 


Neponset Bridge 


66,927 28 


10,269 22 


— 


— 


- 




77,196 50 


General expense 


— 


131,664 64 


3,149 62 


— 


— 




134,814 26 


Totals .... 


$631,158 69 


$392,320 29 


$47,039 17 


$351,070 77 


$4,410 


60 


$1,425,999 52 



72 P. D. 48 

Summary of Expenditures for Year ending November 30, 1925 — Concluded 



* 


Metropoli- 
tan Parks 
Expense 
Fund 


Special Ap- 
propriations, 

Repairs, 
Construction 

and In- 
vestigations 


Band 
Concerts 


Totals 


Nantasket Beach Reservation 

Wellington Bridge 

Charles River Basin 

Bunker Hill Monument .... 
Northern Traffic Route .... 
Charles River Bridges 


$29,495 99 

3,535 16 
2,328 37 


$80,354 47 
16,041 11 
207,203 26i 
9,537 48 
113,559 052 
408,435 832 


$9,147 52 


$118,997 98 

16,041 11 

210,738 42 

11,865 85 

113,559 05 

408,435 83 













1 Maintenance. 2 Loan. 

Summary of Expenditures for the Year ending November 30, 1925 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund $110 00 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 631,158 69 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General 726,625 98 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards, General 392,320 29 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund . 187,025 53 

Special Appropriations, Repairs, Construction and Investigations 1,465,638 80 

Band Concerts 19,668 56 

Total $3,422,547 85 



WATER AND SEWERAGE DIVISIONS 

WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments 

Total loans authorized to December 1, 1925 $45,915,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construction and 
acquisition of works: 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 $287,839 93 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 10,164 72 

298,004 65 

Receipt from the town of Swampscott for admission to district (St. 

1909, c. 320) 90,000 00 

Receipt from the town of Brookline for admission to district (St. 1925, 

c. 308) 400,000 00 

Total amount authorized to December 1, 1925 $46,703,004 65 

Expended from Water Loan Fund: 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 $44,879,531 15 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 1,370,288 73 

46,249,819 88 

Balance, December 1, 1925 $453,184 77 

(2) Total Water Debt, November 30, 1925 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds $41,398,000 00 

Serial bonds 4,287,000 00 

Total bond issue to November 30, 1925 $45,685,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to December 1, 1924 $422,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1925 85,000 00 

507,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding November 30, 1925 $45,178,000 00 

Gross water debt $45,178,000 00 

Sinking fund, November 30, 1925 22,478,585 22 

Net water debt, November 30, 1925 $22,699,414 78 

A decrease for the year of $29,242 32 



P. D. 48 73 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, November 30, 1925 







Bonds 


Bonds 




Year 


Authorized 


issued 


issued 


Sinking 


Loans 


. (Sinking 


(Serial 


Fund 






Fund) 


Bonds) 




1895 . 


$27,000,000 


$5,000,000 




$226,286 05 


1896 . 






— 


2,000,000 


— 


699,860 70 


1897 . 






— 


6,000,000 


— 


954,469 00 


1898 . 






— 


4,000,000 


— 


1,416,374 29 


1899 . 






— 


3,000,000 


— 


1,349,332 97 


1900 . 






— 


1,000,000 


— 


1,573,619 72 


1901 . 






13,000,000 


10,000,000 


— 


1,662,426 95 


1902 . 






— 


3,500,000 


— 


2,256,803 81 


1903 . 






— 


1,500,000 


— 


2,877,835 59 


1904 . 






— 


2,500,000 


— 


3,519,602 92 


1905 . 






— 


650,000 


— 


4,207,045 69 


1906 . 


» 




500,000 


1,350,000 


— 


4,897,822 62 


1907 . 






— 


— 


— 


5,643,575 69 


1908 . 






398,000 


— 


— 


6,419,283 28 


1909 . 






900,000 


398,000 


— 


7,226,262 31 


1910 . 






80,000 


500,000 


— 


8,089,902 91 


1911 . 






212,000 


— 


$200,000 


8,953,437 44 


1912 . 






600,000 


— 


190,000 


9,829,356 80 


1913 . 






108,000 


— 


— 


10,767,701 68 


1914 . 






— 


— 


258,000 


11,533,453 45 


1915 . 






— 


— 


490,000 


12,491,245 25 


1916 . 






— 


— 


66,000 


13,268,199 36 


1917 . 






— 


— 


150,000 


14,036,278 88 


1918 . 






115,000 


— 


— 


14,870,834 84 


1919 . 






67,000 


— 


161,000 


15,904,545 14 


1920 . 






2,705,000 


— 


34,000 


16,953,165 15 


1921 . 






— 


— 


— 


18,147,014 21 


1922 . 






— 


— 


500,000 


19,230,940 55 


1923 . 






— 


— 


100,000 


20,278,381 86 


1924 . 






— 


— 


1,000,000 


21,396,342 90 


1925 . 






230,000 


— 


1,138,000 


22,478,585 22 








$45,915,000 


$41,398,000 


$4,287,000 


— 



(4) Water Assessment, 1925 

* 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth upon the various municipalities : — 

Sinking fund requirements 

Serial bonds ..... 

Less premium ..... 



$115,000 00 
26,618 96 



$179,049 03 



Interest ...... 

Maintenance: 

Appropriated by Legislature . 
Less balance on hand 

Credit to Brookline for water furnished 

Total water assessment for 1925 



$785,900 00 
44,719 43 



88,381 04 
1,518,805 45 



741,180 57 
81,544 43 

$2,608,960 52 



74 P. D. 48 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to 

Water Companies 

Sums have been received during the year 1925 under the provisions of the 
Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as follows: — 

Town of Framingham ....... 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of 

the town of Saugus for the year 1924) 
United States Government (for Peddock's Island) 
Westboro State Hospital ..... 

City of Worcester ...... 

City of Newton ...... 



$9,118 58 

1,550 00 
1,600 23 
2,082 72 
19,680 00 
7,887 09 



$41,918 62 

The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually distributed 

among the cities and towns of the District, but since that date, in accordance 

with provisions of Chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, the sums so received have 

been paid into the sinking fund. 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the various opera- 
tions for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition 

of the works 

Distribution System: 

Improving Wachusett Reservoir 

Northern high service pipe lines . 

Additional pumping machinery at Spot Pond Pumping Station . 

Low service pipe lines 

Southern high service pipe lines 

Northern extra high service: 

Arlington Reservoir . . 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

Meters and connections 



Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage 
yards, and later transferred as needed to the various parts of the 
work : — 
Amount received 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and 
included in costs of special works 



Amount charged from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to December 1, 1925 



For the Year ending 
November 30, 1925 






$4 17 


$2,964 

85,472 

29,067 

110,950 

224 


28 
60 
96 
31 
72 




12 

1,157,533 

8,770 


00 
56 
27 


1,394,995 70 






$1,394,999 87 


$20,673 


55 




45,384 


69 


24,711 14 






$1,370,288 73 
44,879,531 15 






$46,249,819 88 



Maintenance and Operation 



Administration 

General supervision 

Taxes and other expenses '. 

Filtration of water supply 

Wachusett Department: 

Superintendence 

Reservoir 

Forestry 

Protection of supply 

Buildings and grounds 

Wachusett Dam 

Wachusett Aqueduct 

Clinton Sewerage System: 

Pumping station . 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds 

Sanitary inspection 

Swamp drainage 

Power plant 

Wachusett-Sudbury power transmission fine . .... 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 



For the year Ending 
November 30, 1925 





$10,712 21 




27,568 85 




50,394 10 




10,095 44 


$11,266 22 




35,127 87 




12,742 88 




6,880 59 




6,219 92 




9,553 36 




14,354 25 




1,432 42 




9,916 10 




1,490 25 




6,582 99 




12,517 56 




123 01 




92 43 






128,299 85 





P. D. 48 



75 



Maintenance and Operation — Concluded 



Sudbury Department: 

Superintendence, Framingham office 

Ashland Reservoir . 

Hopkinton Reservoir . 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Lake Cochituate 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 

Sanitary inspection 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

Weston Aqueduct 

Forestry 

Power Plant . . . 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 

Distribution Department: 

Superintendence , ' . 

Pumping service: 

Superintendence 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appro- 
priations 

Arlington Pumping Station, pumping service 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service No. 2 . 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service No. 1 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, pumping service 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, pumping service 

Chelsea Reservoir 

Bear Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds 

Fells Reservoir 

Forbes Hill Reservoir 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station 

Mystic Reservoir 

Waban Hill Reservoir 

Weston Reservoir 

Spot Pond 

Buildings at Spot Pond 

Pipe lines: 

Low service 

Northern high service 

Northern extra high service 

Southern high service 

Southern extra high service 

Supply pipe fines . 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings 

Stables . 

Venturi meters 

Measurement of water 

Arlington Pumping Station, building and grounds 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, building and grounds .... 

Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Bellevue Reservoir 

Arlington Reservoir ...... .... 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 

Stock 



Credit amount received for coal penalties and telephone tolls 
Total for maintaining and operating works 



For the Year Ending 
November 30, 1925 



$13,084 02 

4,111 17 

3,764 52 

4,403 16 
17,460 04 
15,770 65 
10,841 

5,094 

5,825 

2,568 

3,632 

5,526 

9,224 

9,350 

9,659 
11,445 



1,319 
15,365 
96,078 
38,199 
26,197 
10,823 

483 

28,138 

1,875 

1,764 

3,022 

1,120 

730 

6,824 

11,048 

1,720 

48,535 

14,309 

162 

12,022 

670 

4,411 

6,787 

2,721 

4,155 

8,228 

1,656 

4,006 

980 

431 

2,077 

362 

721 



57 
27 
98 
63 
50 
24 
06 
26 
01 
34 



113 43 



$11,083 19 
8,508 25 



87 
14 
41 
94 
45 
27 
59 
77 
00 
67 
17 
47 
43 
12 
96 
75 
52 

10 
97 
05 
03 
01 
75 
14 
92 
15 
36 
22 
66 
89 
35 
49 
40 
17 



383 71 
815 58 



131,874 85 



377,743 92 

$736,689 22 
454 58 

$736,234 64 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expenditures and 
disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 1925. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on account of 
construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning December 1, 
1924, and ending November 30, 1925, was $1,370,288.73 and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 
1895, to November 30, 1925 has been $46,249,819.88. 



76 P. D. 48 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year were 
$735,944.12. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of administra- 
tion, have been apportioned to the construction of the works and to the 
maintenance and operation of the same and appear under each of those 
headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their general 
character: — 



General Character of Expenditures 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking 

A dministration 
Stationery and printing 

Engineering 

Chief Engineer 

Principal assistant engineers 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Construction 
Preliminary work: 

Advertising 

Contracts, Distribution System 

Additional work: 

Labor 

Municipal and corporation work 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Real Estate 

Legal and expert 

Settlements made by Board 



Amount charged from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 

Total amount of construction expenditures to November 30, 1925. 



For the year ending 
November 30, 1925 



$4 17 



$1,162 90 

5,865 31 

25,352 92 

13,763 63 

2,299 41 


48,444 17 




$83 15 
1,272,227 28 




12,914 88 

25,280 25 

7,974 09 


1,318,479 65 


$390 74 
2,970 00 


3,360 74 




$1,370,288 73 
44,879,531 15 




$46,249,819 88 



Maintenance and Operation of Works 



Administration : 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Pumping service: 

Superintendence 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: 

Superintendence 

Engineering assistants 

Sanitary inspectors 

Labor 

Alterations and repairs of buildings 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Contracts 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Filtration of water supply 

Credit amount received for coal penalties and telephone tolls 
Total expenditures for maintenance and operation 



For the Year ending 
November 30, 1925 



$2,500 00 
5,853 79 
1,094 26 
1,264 16 



$20,869 74 
3,286 62 
3,412 49 



$8,508 25 

119,121 99 

68,862 09 



$9,230 00 
22,705 84 

4,290 00 
333,010 47 

4,209 85 
59,922 

8,057 



59 
54 



$10,712 21 



27,568 85 



196,492 33 



441,426 29 
50,394 10 
10,095 44 

$736,689 22 
454 58 

$736,234 64 



P. D. 48 77 

(6) Receipts 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Commission and 
from sales of property for the year beginning December 1, 1924, and ending 
November 30, 1925, was $137,857.75 and the total amount from the time of 
the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1925, has been $2,323,279.59. The general character of these 
receipts is as follows : — 



General Character of Receipts 



Applicable to the loan fund: 

Land and buildings 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements 

Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: 

Rents 

Land products 

Electric energy 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements 

Interest and unclassified receipts 

Applicable to the sinking fund: 

Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others. 

Less amounts received for coal penalties and telephone tolls, credited to 
expenditures 

Amount credited from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 

Total receipts to December 1, 1925 ....... 



For the Year ending 
November 30, 1925 



$250 00 
2,289 72 



$4,266 70 
4,895 25 

71,029 57 
5,954 47 
7,708 00 



$2,539 72 



93,853 99 

41,918 62 

$138,312 33 

454 58 

$137,857 75 
2,185,421 84 

$2,323,279 59 



Sources of Receipts 



Supplying water outside of water district 

Construction and acquisition of works: 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Distribution System 

District entrance fees 

Maintenance and operation of works: 

Administration 

General supervision 

Wachusett Aqueduct 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Wachusett Electric Power Plant 

Sudbury System 

Sudbury Electric Power Plant 

Distribution System 

Clinton Sewerage System 

Less amounts received for coal penalties and telephone tolls, credited to 
expenditures 

Amount credited from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 . • . 
Total receipts to December 1, 1925 



For the Year ending 


November 30, 1925 




$41,918 62 


$250 00 




2,289 72 




7,625 00 






10,164 72 


$123 80 




243 24 




606 93 




5,841 05 




38,574 85 




1,667 39 




32,454 72 




5,305 96 




1,411 05 






86,228 99 






$138,312 33 




454 58 




$137,857 75 




2,185,421 84 




$2,323,279 59 



SEWERAGE WORKS 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of these loans, the expen- 
ditures for construction, and the balances available on December 1, 1925 
have been as follows : — 



78 P. D. 48 

North Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized under various acts to December 1, 1925, for the construction of the 

North Metropolitan System and the various extensions 88,288,500 00 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources which 
are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan System: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $101 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 87,566 04 

87,667 04 



< 



$8,376,167 04 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Fund, North System: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $178,095 36 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 7,786,023 03 

7,964,118 39 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, December 1, 1925 $412,048 65 

South Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized under the various acts to December 1, 1925, applied to the construction 
of the Charles River Valley Sewer, Neponset Valley Sewer, High-level Sewer and 
extensions, constituting the South Metropolitan System $10,002,912 00 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 
sources, which are placed to the credit of the South Metropolitan 
System : 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $ - 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 ....".. 24,599 61 

24,599 61 



$10,027,511 61 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Fund, South System: 

On account of the Charles River Valley Sewer $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset Valley Sewer 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level Sewer and extensions, including Welles- 
ley extension 8,292,881 25 

10,004,458 98 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, December 1, 1925 $23,052 63 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, November 30, 1925 

North Metropolitan System 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds $6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds 1,725,500 00 

Total bond issue to November 30, 1925 $8,288,500 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to December 1, 1924 $265,500 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1925 93,500 00 

359,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding November 30, 1925 $7,929,500 00 

Gross sewerage debt $7,929,500 00 

Sinking fund, November 30, 1925 4,822,233 54 

Net sewerage debt November 30, 1925 $3,107,266 46 

A net increase for the year of $217,799.55 

South Metropolitan System 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds $8,877,912 00 

Serial bonds 1,125,000 00 

Total bond issue to November 30, 1925 $10,002,912 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to December 1, 1924 $211,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1925 32,000 00 

243,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding November 30, 1925 $9,759,912 00 

Gross sewerage debt $9,759,912 00 

Sinking fund November 30, 1925 3,129,165 16 

Net sewerage debt November 30, 1925 $6,630,746 84 

A net decrease for the year of $291,164.48 



P. D. 48 79 

(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, Novem- 
ber 30, 1925 





T /-v 




Bonds 


Issued 


Bonds 


Issued 


Sinking 




LiOaxno 


(Sinking Fund) 


(Serial 


Bonds 


Fund 


Year 


















North 


South 


North 


South 


North 


South 


North and 

South 

Systems 




System 


System 


System 


System 


System 


System 


1889 . 


4,200,000 


$800,000 












1890 . 


- 


- 


$2,200,000 


$800,000 


— 


- 


- 


1891 . 


- 


- 


368,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1892 . 


- 


- 


1,053,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1893 . 


- 


- 


579,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1894 . 


500,000 


- 


500,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1895 . 


300,000 


500,000 


300,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1896 . 


30,000 


- 


30,000 


200,000 


- 


— 


- 


1897 . 


85,000 


300,000 


80,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1898 . 


215,000 


35,000 


220,000 


35,000 


- 


- 


- 


1899 . 


- 


4,625,000 


- 


1,025,000 


- 


- 


$361,416 59 


1900 . 


265,000 


10,9121 


265,000 


10,912 


- 


- 


454,520 57 


1901 . 


- 


40,000 


- 


2,040,000 


- 


- 


545,668 26 


1902 . 


- 


- 


- 


864,000 


- 


- 


636,084 04 


1903 . 


500,000 


1,000,000 


500,000 


1,736,000 


- 


- 


754,690 41 


1904 . 


- 


392,000 


- 


392,000 


- 


- 


878,557 12 


1905 . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,008,724 95 


1906 . 


55,000 


1,175,000 


55,000 


175,000 


- 


- 


1,146,998 68 


1907 . 


- 


- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


1,306,850 30 


1908 . 


413,000 


- 


- 


700,000 


- 


— 


1,492,418 98 


1909 . 


- 


- 


300,000 


- 


— 


- 


1,673,784 40 


1910 . 


56,000 


- 


113,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,931,741 89 


1911 . 


6,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,184,674 98 


1912 . 


378,000 


- 


- 


- 


$62,000 


- 


2,458,541 20 


1913 . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


378,000 


- 


2,749,337 90 


1914 . 


130,500 


350,000 


- 


- 


— 


- 


3,011,512 44 


1915 . 


70,000 


5,000 


- 


- 


130,500 


— 


3,290,979 46 


1916 . 


285,000 


40,000 


- 


- 


70,000 


$355,000 


3,604,657 27 


1917 . 


- 


325,000 


- 


— 


285,000 


40,000 


3,925,792 75 


1918 . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


325,000 


4,270,205 50 


1919 . 


- 


225,000 


- 


- 


— 


- 


4,695,573 07 


1920 . 


- 


100,000 


- 


- 


- 


225,000 


5,168,524 03 


1921 . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


5,698,228 38 


1922 . 


150,000 


80,000 


- 


- 


- 


100,000 


6,217,099 57 


1923 . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


150,000 


80,000 


6,752,183 63 


1924 . 


650,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7,353,533 77 


1925 . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


650,000 


— 


7,951,398 70 




$8,288,500 


$10,002,912 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


1,725,500 


$1,125,000 


- 



1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

(4) Sewer Assessments, 1925 

The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth upon the various municipalities: 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Sinking fund requirements $175,061 85 

Serial bonds 76,795 85 

Interest 243,404 42 

Maintenance: 

Appropriated by Legislature $340,200 00 

Less balance on hand 10,366 28 

329,833 72 

Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment $825,095 84 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Sinking fund requirements $154,625 56 

Serial bonds 32,000 00 

Interest 338,470 09 

Maintenance: 

Appropriated by Legislature $213,100 00 

Less balance on hand 1,14,310 80 

198,789 20 

Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment $723,884 85 



80 P. D. 48- 

(5) Expenditures for the Different Works 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the various 
operations for the different works: — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works 



North Metropolitan System 
North System, enlargement: 

New Mystic Sewer in Woburn and Winchester (Chapter 529, Acts of 1922) : 

Section 71 

Section 72 

Real estate: 

Settlements 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Real estate (sewer in Reading and Wakefield) : 

Settlements 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Medford and Arlington (Chapter 116, Acts of 
1924) : 

Section 77 

Section 78 

Section 79 

Section 80 

Real estate: 

Settlements $300 00 

Legal 25 50 

Amount charged from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 . 
Total for North Metropolitan System to December 1, 1925 



For the Year ending 
November 30, 1925 



$4,145 97 
3,089 17 

1,200 00 
328 16 

250 00 
43 99 



$87,037 42 

72,294 26 

4,467 13 

4,913 76 



169,038 07 



$9,057 29. 



178,095 36 
7,786,023 03 

$7,964,118 39 



Maintenance and Operation 


For the Year ending 
November 30, 1925 


North Metropolitan System 


$315,920 53 
188,651 13 


Total for maintenance, both systems 


$504,571 66 



(6) Detailed Financial Statement 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, receipts, 
etc., for the year ending November 30, 1925. 

■ 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 



General Character op Expenditures 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking 

North System Enlargement 
Engineering: 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Construction: 

Advertising 

Labor and teaming 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Contracts 

Real estate: 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Settlements 

Total for North Metropolitan System 



For the Year ending 




November 30, 1925 




$1,022 


98 






86 


15 






80 


04 






11,158 


69 






163,599 


85 






397 


65 






1,750 


00 


$178,095 








36 



P. D. 48 

Maintenance and Operation of Works 

North Metropolitan System 
Administration : 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants . 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

General Supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Deer Island Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

East Boston Pumping Station: 

Labor . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Charlestown Pumping Station: 

Labor . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station: 

Labor . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Reading Pumping Station: 

Labor . 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: 

Engineering assistants 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer Investigation 

Credit amount received for coal penalties v 

Total for North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System 
Administration: 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

General Supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, lighting and care of building 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Ward Street Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Quincy Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Nut Island Screen-house: 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: 

Engineering assistants 

Labor 

Supplies and miscellaneous expenses 

City of Boston for pumping 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 

Credit amount received for coal penalties 

Total for South Metropolitan System 



81 



$1,583 35 

2,771 81 

627 35 

483 64 



$7,561 

1,884 

648 


67 
37 
67 


$34,044 
28,598 


71 
61 


$39,995 20 
22,514 86 


$25,445 33 
8,681 34 


$13,095 31 
4,949 56 


$6,814 95 
3,683 96 



$3,000 00 
66,135 86 
23,947 92 



$916 65 

2,582 00 

493 95 

332 58 



$5,008 33 

1,481 87 

234 65 



$44,093 11 
31,226 81 



$13,668 37 
2,942 45 



$13,952 77 
4,676 56 



$6,510 00 

41,748 58 

7,908 70 



$5,466 15 

10,094 71 
62 t 643 32 
62,510 06 
34,126 67 
18,044 87 

10,498 91 



93,083 78 

2,549 55 
16,954 40 

$315,972 42 
51 89 

$315,920 53 



4,325 18 



6,724 85 



75,319 92 



16,610 82 



18,629 33 



56,167 28 

10,300 00 

663 90 

$188,741 28 
90 15 

$188,651 13 






82 P. D. 48 

(6) Receipts 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other sources, 
have been credited as follows : — 



Account 



Construction: 

North Metropolitan System 

Maintenance: 

North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System 

Sinking Fund: 

North Metropolitan System 

Interest Fund: 

North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System 

Amount credited from beginning of work to December 1, 1924 
Total receipts to December 1, 1925 



For the 

Year ending 

November 30, 

1925 


$101 


00 


241 
241 


62 
23 


375 


00 


37 
39 


97 
40 


$1,036 
166,925 


22 
68 


$167,961 


90 



84 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts made and pending during the 





Number 


. 


Number 






of 


WORK 


of 


Lowest 




Contract 




Bids 




1 


70 


Building concrete dam at Black's Creek in Furnace Brook 

Parkway. 
Surfacing Revere Beach Reservation Drive from Eliot Circle 


7 


$11,500 00 


2 


73 


7 


63,125 00 






to Revere Street, Revere. 






3 


74 


Building reinforced concrete bridge and approaches over the 
Charles River at Arsenal Street, Boston and Watertown. 


4 


163,060 00 


4 


76 


Building reinforced concrete bridge and approaches over the 
Charles River at Cambridge Street, Boston and River 
Street, Cambridge. 


7 


250,749 00 


5 


77 


Alteration of stable into a police station at Speedway Head- 
quarters, Brighton. 




13,970 00 


6 


78 


Building reinforced concrete culvert at Patten's Cove, Boston 
(Dorchester District). 


10 


40,225 00 


7 


79 


Surfacing Memorial Drive, Cambridge Parkway, between 
Massachusetts Avenue and Brookline Street, Cambridge. 


8 


17,900 00 


8 


80 


Surfacing Furnace Brook Parkway, Adams Street to Newport 
Avenue, Quincy, and Blue Hills Parkway, easterly road- 
way, north of Blue Hill Terrace, Milton. 


8 


26,855 00 


9 


81 


Surfacing Revere Beach Parkway from Winthrop Avenue, 
Revere, about 1,000 feet easterly. 


4 


4,895 00 


10 


82 


Surfacing Middlesex Fells Parkway, Wellington Bridge to 
Riverside Avenue, westerly roadway, and Middlesex Ave- 
nue to Riverside Avenue, easterly roadway, Somerville. 


9 


20,140 00 


11 


83 


Surfacing Middlesex Fells Parkway, Fulton Street to Forest 
Street, northerly roadway, and Boston & Maine Railroad 
Bridge to Salem Street, easterly roadway, Medford. 


7 


21,850 00 


12 


84 


Filling in Dorchester Bay, Old Colony Parkway, Boston. 


3 


553,500 00 


13 


85 


Building bridge, Old Colony Parkway, over Mt. Vernon 
Street, Boston. 


'5 


117,925 00 


14 


86 


Surfacing Furnace Brook Parkway, Fenno Street to Pilgrim 

Highway, Quincy. 
Grading, surfacing and other work, Old Colony Parkway, 


8 


48,070 00 


15 


87 


6 


5,654 25 






approach to Neponset Bridge, Boston 






16 


88 


Surfacing Middlesex Fells Parkway, Wellington Bridge to 
Mystic Avenue, westerly roadway, Salem Street to Forest 
Street, southerly roadway, Medford and Pond Streets, 
Woodland Road to Washington Street, Melrose. 


6 


30,940 00 



P. D. 48 



85 



Appendix No. 1 



Year 1925 — Parks Division 



Contractor 


Date of 
Contract 


Date of 

Completion of 

Contract 


Value of 

Work done 

December 31, 

1925 


W. A. Norton Company. 


Mar. 12, 1925 


July 31, 1925 


$13,473 92 


Simpson Bros. Corp. 


Sept. 25, 1924 


June 5, 1925 


75,908 061 


V. James Grande. 


Nov. 6, 1924 


Dec. 23, 1925 


160,682 33 


Luke S. White, Inc. 


Mar. 26, 1925 




231,838 75 


John P. Curley. 


Feb. 12, 1925 


July 22, 1925 


14,570 75 


Bay State Dredging & Contracting Company. 


Mar. 26, 1925 


Aug. 26, 1925 


51,449 45 2 


Reynolds Bros., Inc. 


April 30, 1925 


July 22, 1925 


34,217 622 


A. W. Loud. 


May 7, 1925 


July 27, 1925 


29,972 19 


Rowe Contracting Co. 


May 21, 1925 


June 15, 1925 


4,433 21 


Rowe Contracting Co. 


June 11, 1925 


Aug. 20, 1925 


31,069 43 1 


James H. Fannon. 


June 11, 1925 


Aug. 20, 1925 


20,917 24 


Bay State Dredging & Contracting Co. 
Coleman Bros. 


June 11, 1925 
Sept. 3, 1925 




436,022 19 
114,790 50 


E. C. Sargent. 


Aug. 4, 1925 


Oct. 20, 1925 


45,564 59 


John W. O'Connell. 


Sept. 10, 1925 


Oct. 21, 1925 


6,022 01 


Coleman Bros. 


Sept. 17, 1925 


Nov. 17, 1925 


36,520 992 



1 Additional items. 

2 Additional quantities. 



86 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 2 



Contracts made and pending during the 

[The details of Contracts made before 



1 


2 


3 

Num- 


Amount of Bid 


6 


Num- 


4 


5 




ber of 


WORK 


ber of 








Con- 




Bids 


Next to 


Lowest 


Contractor 


tract 






Lowest 






35 


Building and erecting pump- 
ing engine for Spot Pond 
Pumping Station. 


3 


$69,000 00 * 


$67,470 00 


Worthington Pump & 
Machinery Corpora- 
tion, New York. 


40 2 


Furnishing automatic air 
valves. 


2 


3,125 00 


2,232 50 1 


Atlantic Works, East 
Boston. 


442 


Furnishing and laying 60-inch 
steel water pipes in Wal- 
tham, Section 10 of Weston 
Aqueduct Supply Mains. 


4 


695,620 00 


563,230 00 » 


C. & R. Construction 
Co., Boston. 


472 


Furnishing and laying 56-inch 


7 


580,715 00 


512,629 00 J 


T. A. Gillespie Co., New 




steel water pipes in Wal- 




(or for 60- 




York. 




tham, Belmont and Arling- 




inch riv- 








ton, Section 11 of Weston 




eted steel 








Aqueduct Supply Mains. 




pipe 
$543,755.) 






48 


Furnishing and laying 60-inch 


5 


205,775 00 l 


206,921 40 


C. & R. Construction 




riveted steel water pipes in 






(for Lock- 


Co., Boston. 




Arlington and Somerville. 






bar steel 
pipe.) 




492 


Furnishing and laying 48-inch 
cast-iron water pipes in 
Somerville and Medford. 

ft 


7 


96,422 501 


103,472 50 


George M. Bryne, Win- 
chester, Mass. 


50 


Furnishing and laying 38-inch 
riveted steel water pipes in 
Maiden, Melrose and Stone- 


5 


141,325 00 1 


153,580 00 


Cenedella & Co., Mil- 
ford, Mass. 




ham. 











1 Contract based upon this bid. 

2 Contract completed. 



P. D. 48 



87 



Appendix No. % 



Year 1925 — Water Division 

1925 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of 
Contract 



Oct. 18, 1923 

Mar. 31, 1924 
July 10, 1924 

Oct. 3, 1924 



May 26, 1925 



May 26, 1925 



July 30, 1925 



8 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Nov. 28, 1925 
Nov. 4, 1925 

Oct. 14, 1925 



Dec. 1, 1925 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 



See annual report for 1923. 

See previous annual report. 
See previous annual report. 

See previous annual report. 



For furnishing and laying 60-inch riveted steel pipe, 
$25.75 per lin. ft.; for laying 16-inch and smaller cast- 
iron pipes for blow-offs and connections, $5.00 per lin. 
ft. ; for laying 6-inch cast-iron pipe for air inlets, $2.00 
per lin. ft. ; for rock excavation above or below estab- 
lished grade, $5.00 per cu. yd.; for earth excavation 
below established grade, $4.00 per cu. yd.; additional 
for pipe ^ - inch in thickness and additional cost of 
work under Alewife Brook and Parkway, lump sum 
$6,000; for chambers for blow-off and by-pass valves, 
$105 per chamber; for chambers for air valves, $70.00 
per chamber; for concrete masonry, $12 per cu. yd.; 
for bituminous macadam resurfacing in streets, $1.10 
per sq. yd. 

For furnishing and laying 48-inch cast-iron pipe, $27.45 
per lin. ft.; for laying 48-inch cast-iron pipe furnished 
by the Commonwealth, $8.00 per lin. ft.; for laying 
12-inch and smaller cast-iron pipes for blow-offs and 
connections, $3.00 per lin. ft.; for transporting pipes 
and materials furnished by the Commonwealth, at the 
Chestnut Hill Pipe Yard $2.25 per ton, at the Glen- 
wood Pipe Yard $2.00 per ton; for rock excavation 
above or below established grade, $5.00 per cu. yd.; 
for earth excavation below established grade, $3.00 
per cu. yd.; for chambers for 36-inch valves, $175 per 
chamber; for chambers for blow-off, by-pass and air 
valves, $100 per chamber; for concrete masonry, $15 
per cu. yd. 

For furnishing and laying 38-inch riveted steel pipe, 
$16.30 per lin. ft.; for laying 30-inch and smaller cast- 
iron pipes for blow-offs and connections, $5.00 per lin. 
ft.; for laying 6-inch cast-iron pipes for air inlets, 
$2.00 per lin ft.; for rock excavation above or below 
established grade, $7.00 per cu. yd. ; for earth excava- 
tion below established grade, $3.00 per cu. yd.; for 
connecting steel pipe with the gate-house at Fells Res- 
ervoir, lump sum $200; for chambers for blow-off and 
by-pass valves, $250 per chamber; for chambers for 
air valves, $150 per chamber; for chamber for 30-inch 
valve, $200; for concrete masonry, $10.00 per cu. yd.; 
for bituminous macadam resurfacing in streets, $1.50 
per sq. yd. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1925 



$48,300 00 

2,777 90 
631,861 51 

541,653 57 



199,123 99 



104,757 56 



103,314 65 



88 



P. D. 48 
Contracts made and pending during the 



1 


2 


3 


Amouni 


1 of Bid 


6 


Num- 


4 


5 




ber of 




Num- 








Con- 


WORK 


ber of 


Next to 






tract 




Bids 


Lowest 


Lowest 


Contractor 


512 


Venturi Meters and parts. 




-3 


-3 


Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 


522 


Furnishing cast-iron water 
pipes and special castings. 


- 


-3 


-3 


Warren Foundry & Pipe 
Co., Phillipsburg, N. J. 


532 


Furnishing 4 street chambers 
for Venturi meter registers. 


6 


1.274 00 


1,160 00 1 


James Russell Boiler 
Works Co., Dorches- 
ter, Mass. 


21-M 


Sale and cutting of chestnut 
and miscellaneous standing 
timber on marginal lands of 
the Wachusett Reservoir. 


2 


5,000 005 


9,750 00 14 


Wilder, Walker & Davis 
Co., Sterling, Mass. 


22-M2 


Repairing roofs of water works 
buildings in Stoneham and 
Weston. 


2 


3,975 00 


3,760 00 » 


Charles V. Browne, Win- 
throp, Mass. 


23-M 


Cleaning of Mystic water 


- 


-3 


_3 


National Water Main 




mains. 








Cleaning Co., New 
York, N. Y. 


24-M2 


Repairing driveways at Chest- 
nut Hill. 


5 


6,897 00 


6,072 001 


Ezekiel C. Sargent, 
Quincy, Mass. 


25-M 


Repairing roofs of Depart- 
ment buildings in Somer- 
ville and Medford. 


3 


3,280 00 


2,982 00 1 


Everett F. Penshorn, 
Boston, Mass. 


51-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 


1 


- 


$5.30 per 


New England Power 




energy to be developed at 






M kilowatt 


Company and Edison 




Wachusett Dam in Clinton. 






hours. 


Electric Illuminating 
Company of Boston. 


Agree- 


Sale and purchase of electric 


-6 


-0 


-6 


Edison Electric Illumin- 


ment 


energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam in Southbor- 
ough. 








ating Company of Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 

2 Contract completed. 

3 Competitive bids were not received. 

4 Highest bid. 

8 Next to highest bid. 

6 Sale of energy continued since January 1, 1922, at same price as formerly under modified extension of 
contract No. 39-M. 



P. D. 48 
Year 1925 



89 



Water Division — Continued 



7 


8 


9 


10 


Date of Con- 
tract 


Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 


Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 
1925 


May 27, 1925 


Nov. 28, 1925 


For 20-inch by 10-inch Venturi meter tubes with spigot 
ends, $675; for spigot inlet and outlet sections, $190 
per pair; for Venturi meter tubes with spigot ends, 
$285; special rust-proof Type Y register indicator 
recorders, $750. 


$6,803 00 


June 12, 1925 
July 18, 1925 


Nov. 25, 1925 
Oct. 28, 1925 


For 6-inch straight pipe, Class C, $54.90 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for special castings, $125 per ton of 2,000 
pounds. 

For each chamber, $290. 


5,030 71 
1,160 00 


Dec. 7, 1923 


- 


See annual report for 1923. 


9,650 00 


Oct. 7, 1924 


June 24, 1925 


See previous annual report. 


4,296 00 


May 27, 1925 


- 


Cleaning 30-inch and 24-inch cast-iron pipe, 10 cents per 
linear foot. 


1,408 70 


Oct. 2, 1925 
Nov. 14, 1925 


Nov. 11, 1925 


Penetrated asphalt macadam, $1.23 per sq. yd.: liquid 

asphalt surfacing, 17 cents per sq. yd. 
Lump sum, $2,982. 


6,151 14 
1,491 00 


Jan. 13, 1917 


- 


See annual report for 1917. 


322,898 44 


Jan. 1, 1922 


- 


See annual report for 1922 


136,609 23 



90 P. D. 48 

Contracts made and Pending during the Year 1925 — Water Division 

Concluded 

Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1925, inclusive 1 



Distribution Section, 9 contracts 
Pumping Service, 1 contract 



443 contracts completed from 1896 to 1924, inclusive 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston 
Total of 453 contracts 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 1925 



$1,596,482 89 

48,300 00 

$1,644,782 89 

18,818,806 06 



$20,463,588 95 
512,000 00 



$19,951,588 95 



1 In this summary contracts for the sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 
excluded. 



P. D. 48 



91 



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00i-li-<<N OOOOOONO) 05005 

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Wachusett Watershed: 

Princeton 

Jefferson .... 

Sterling 

Boylston .... 
Sudbury Watershed: 

Sudbury Dam 

Framingham 

Ashland Dam 

Cordaville 

Lake Cochituate 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir .... 

Average of all 

Average, Wachusett Watershed . 
Average, Sudbury Watershed 



92 



P. D. 48 
Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1925 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 

i 


Jan. 2 


\ .271 


5.30 p.m. to 


June 1 


.78 


■ - — — — 

6.05 p.m. to 7.15 p.m. 


Jan. 3 


J 


5.30 a.m. 


June 9 


\ .02 


11.30 p.m. to 


Jan. 11 


j 1.012 


11.40 p.m. to 


June 10 


5.45 a.m. 


Jan. 12 


/ 


6.30 a.m. 


June 14 


.20 


6.30 p.m. to 7.15 p.m. 


Jan. 16 


1 .752 


2.00 p.m. to 


June 15 


.45 


8.20 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Jan. 17 


/ 


2.45 a.m. 


June 16 


.08 


5.40 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 


Jan. 18 


.051 


6.30 a.m. to 2.15 p.m. 


June 18 


.18 


2.25 a.m. to 5.15 a.m. 


Jan. 20 


1.211 


6.10 a.m. to 8.00 P.M. 


June 20 


.41 


8.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


Jan. 27 


.571 


5.20 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


June 22 


1 .26 


10.40 p.m. to 


Jan. 29 


1 1.092 


5.30 p.m. to 


June 23 


6.45 a.m. 


Jan. 30 


3.00 A. M. 


June 25 
June 28 


.60 
.16 


8.00 a.m. to 11.45 p.m. 
6.10 a.m. to 7.30 p.m. 








Total . 


4.95 




June 29 
June 29 
June 30 


.40 
J .87 


2.30 a.m. to 4.40 a.m. 
6.30 p.m. to 

4.30 a.m. 


Feb. 3 


.061 


9.00 a.m. to 7.15 p.m. 


Feb. 10 


08 


6.10 a.m. to 11.00 a.m. 
2.45 p.m. to 








Feb! 11 


1 1.17 
.45 


Total . 


4.41 




Feb. 12 


4.30 p.m. 
1.30 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 








Feb. 15 ! 


July 4 


.22 


5.10 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


Feb. 23 


.05 


6.00 a.m. to 11.30 A.M. 


July 5 


.03 


2.20 a.m. to 9.00 A.M. 


Feb. 23 


.03 


7.15 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


July 7 


} ' 7S 


5.40 p.m. to 


Feb. 25 


} ■-" 


7.30 p.m. to 


July 8 


7.00 a.m. 


Feb. 26 


2.30 p.m. 


July 10 


.05 


6.45 a.m. to 8.00 a.m. 








July 16 


.05 


3.35 a.m. to 6.20 a.m. 






Total . 


1.98 




July 17 
July 18 


} ' 10 


10.25 p.m. to 

2.00 A.M. 








March 1 . 


.49 


2.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. 


July 22 


.52 


5.00 p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 


March 5 . 


\ 1.62 


2.30 p.m. to 


July 25 


\ .45 


11.50 p.m. to 


March 6 . 


/ 


10.30 A.M. 


July 26 


11.00 a.m. 


March 11 . 


1 .17 


11.20 p.m. to 


July 27 


.22 


1.00 a.m. to 2.00 A.M. 


March 12 . 


j 


3.30 a.m. 


July 27 


1.27 


6.45 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 


March 13 . 


\ .32 


10.15 p.m. to 


July 28 


.27 


5.20 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


March 14 . 


/ 


3.10 p.m. 


July 31 


J .58 


8.00 p.m. to 


March 17 . 


.40 


12.40 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 


Aug. 1 


7.30 a.m. 


March 19 . 
March 25 . 


1.20 
.08 


5.00 a.m. to 1.00 P.M. 
11.30 a.m. to 1.00 P.M. 








Total . 


4.51 




March 27 . 
March 28 . 


1 .02 


8.50 p.m. to 

4.30 a.m. 








August 5 . 


1 .58 


1.40 p.m. to 


March 28 . 


{ 1.76 


11.10 A.M. tO 


August 6 . 


j 


8.30 a.m. 


March 30 . 


/ 


9.10 p.m. 


August 9. . 
August 10 . 


j .11 


9.30 a.m. to 

7.00 A.M. 






Total . 


6.06 




August 13 . 
August 14 . 
August 21 . 


| .19 


11.00 A.M. tO 

12 Noon 
11.40 a.m. to 7.00 P.M. 


April 10 


1 .38 


3.30 p.m. to 


.03 


April 11 


3.00 A.M. 












April 12 


.03 


1.00 A.M. tO 4.00 A.M. 


Total . 


.91 




April 13 
April 15 


.37 
.50 


2.00 A.M. to 8.00 A.M. 
2.10 A.M. tO 10.15 A.M. 








Sept. 3 


\ 1.14 


6.15 a.m. to 


April 15 


.16 


4.00 p.m. to 4.40 p.m. 


Sept. 4 . 


I 


11.45 A.M. 


April 19 


1 1.20 


10.45 a.m. to 


Sept. 7 . 


\ .91 


1.30 A.M. tO 


April 20 


j 


6.15 A.M. 


Sept. 8 . 


J 


5.00 A.M. 


April 25 . 


1 .04 


6.10 p.m. to 


Sept. 14 . 


.48 


8.15 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 


April 26 




5.45 a.m. 


Sept. 15 


\ .72 


9.20 p.m. to 


April 30 . 


j .09 


1.30 A.M. tO 


Sept. 16 . 


5.00 p.m. 


May 1 


j 


5.20 a.m. 


Sept. 21 . 


.05 


4.00 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 








Sept. 27 . 
Sept. 28 . 

Total . 


| .05 


11.45 p.m. to 

1.00 a.m. 


Tofcal . 


2.77 




May 2 
May 4 
May 5 


.03 

| .07 


3.00 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 
12.30 p.m. to 

4.00 A.M. 


3.35 




Oct. 3 


.85 


1.15 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


May 11 


.40 


2.30 a.m. to 8.45 p.m. 


Oct. 5 


.43 


2.05 a.m. to 4.10 p.m. 


May 14 


| .44 


11.30 p.m. to 


Oct. 9 


I .922 


10.35 a.m. to 


May 15 


2.00 p.m. 


Oct. 10 


j 


12.10 p.m. 


May 17 


.09 


5.50 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 


Oct. 14 


\ .51 


10.00 p.m. to 


May 23 


.06 


1.45 a.m. to 5.15 A.M. 


Oct. 15 


j 


5.30 a.m. 


May 23 


} ' 61 


10.45 a.m. to 


Oct. 16 


\ .08 


10.00 p.m. to 


May 25 


4.00 A.M. 


Oct. 17 


/ 


3.15 A.M. 


May 25 


.11 


8.15 a.m. to 6.15 p.m. 


Oct. 19 


.09 


7.30 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


May 29 


\ .30 


4.30 p.m. to 


Oct. 23 


.05 


7.55 a.m. to 10.00 A.M. 


May 30 


5.15 A.M. 


Oct. 24 


1 .97 


8.45 p.m. to 


May 30 


.15 


6.30 p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 


Oct. 25 


j 


4.00 p.m. 


May 31 


\ .13 


9.00 p.m. to 


Oct. 28 


\ .19 


5.00 p.m. to 


June 1 


) 


4.00 A.M. 


Oct. 29 

Total . 


/ 


12.30 a.m. 


Total . 


2.39 


4.09 





i Snow. 



Total for year, 45.00 inches. 

2 Rain and Snow. 



P. D. 48 93 

Table No. 2 — Rainfall in inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1925 — Continued 



Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Nov. 6 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 13 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 23 
Nov. 27 
Nov. 28 




.18 

.24 

J 1.31 

1.09 
.34 

\ .392 


1.45 a.m. to 9.00 A.M. 
3.30 p.m. to 7.35 p.m. 
8.45 p.m. to 

10.00 A.M. 
3.15 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 

3.20 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 
6.45 a.m. to 

1.15 A.M. 


Dec. 1 
Dec. 3 
Dec. 6 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 12 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 21 
Dec. 21 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 25 




.352 
j 4.20 

.02 

.03 

\ .72 

1 .39 

| .152 

.171 


7.45 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
3.00 a.m. to 

6.30 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
1.00 a.m. to 7.00 a.m. 
2.20 p.m. to 

7.00 a.m. 
9.45 p.m. to 

2.30 p.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 

2.45 a.m. 
8.30 a.m. to 8.30 p!m! 


Total . 


3.55 






Total 




6.03 





1 Snow 



Total for year 45.00 inches 

2 Rain and Snow. 



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P. D. 48 97 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct 



Month 



January . 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

Flowing 



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15 
17 
16 
25 
26 
26 
26 
24 
26 
24 
19 



270 



Actual Time 



Hours 



315 
152 
196 
203 
253 
272 
278 
258 
274 
258 
254 
198 



Minutes 









15 



40 



30 

15 

30 

45 





121.41 days 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



4,157.4 
1,940.4 
1,934.5 
2,222.0 
3,745.9 
3,995.7 
4,061.4 
3,436.6 



3,897 
3,813. 
2,965 
2,229 



38,399.5 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir 



Month 



January . 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 
Water was 
Flowing 



26 
24 
26 
26 
26 
26 
27 
26 
26 
27 
30 
29 



319 



Actual Time 



Hours 



445 
393 
445 
429 
429 
443 
430 
445 
426 
450 
458 
469 



Minutes 



30 
43 
30 
30 
07 
55 
41 
30 
40 
13 
00 
45 



219 . 50 days 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



2,078.2 
1,850.6 
2,035.8 
1,976.8 
1,949.0 
2,029.9 
2,066.6 
2,048.4 
2,041.1 
2,109.2 
2,130.9 
2,260.5 



24,577.0 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir 



Month 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water Was 

Flowing 



31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



365 



Actual Time 
(Hours) 



744 
672 
744 
719 
744 
720 
736 
744 
721 
744 
720 
744 



8,752 



Million 

Gallons 

Drawn 



2.045.4 
1,579.4 
1,529.2 
1,409.0 
1,671.8 
1,877.7 
1,750.6 
1,559.8 
1,758.4 
1,787.3 
1,419.0 
1,585.6 



19,973.2 



98 P. D. 48 

Table No. 7. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 

1925 by Months 1 



Month 



January . 

February 

March ' . 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

Average 



Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons) 



133,922,000 

69,118,000 

62,229,000 

73,996,000 

120,658,000 

132,986,000 

130,803,000 

110,664,000 

129,517,000 

122,813,000 

98,650,000 

71,725,000 



105,102,000 



Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons) 



67,039,000 
66,093,000 
65,671,000 
65,985,000 
62,871,000 
67,663,000 
66,664,000 
66,077,000 
67,942,000 
68,039,000 
71,030,000 
72,919,000 



67,334,000 



Sudbury 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) 



65,981,000 
56,407,000 
49,329,000 
47,032,000 
53,929,000 
62,590,000 
56,471,000 
50,316,000 
58,532,000 
57,655,000 
47,300,000 
51,148,000 



54,721,000 



Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) 



6,742,000 

11,226,000 

4,867,000 

229,000 



1,946,000 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



P. D. 48 



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106 

Table No. 15. 



P. D. 48 

Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
1898-1925. [Parts per 100,000] 





Color 


Residue on 
Evaporation 




Ammonia 






73 
O 

S 

3 

33 










CJ 




albuminoid 




Year 


u 




'3 






T3 






a 

o 

O 


03 




2 fl 


"3 




Ol 


"3 


w 

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03 


a 


a 

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a 
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03 






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H 


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h-5 




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5 


3 


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9 

X 


1898 .... 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899 










.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900 










.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901 










.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902 










.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903 










.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904 










.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905 










.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906 










.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907 










.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908 










.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909 










.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910 










.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911 










.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912 










.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913 










.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914 










.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915 










.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916 










.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 




1.4 


1917 










.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


— 


1.3 


1918 










.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


— 


1.4 


1919 










.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


_ 


1.5 


1920 










.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


— 


1.5 


1921 










.13 


3.80 


1.39 


.0006 


.0104 


.0089 


.0015 


.25 


_ 


1.4 


1922 










.16 


3.98 


1.55 


.0011 


.0097 


.0080 


.0017 


.30 


_ 


1.8 


1923 










.15 


3.90 


1.45 


.0011 


.0100 


.0090 


.0010 


.26 


— 


1.5 


1924 










.12 


4.10 


1.60 


.0011 


.0109 


.0084 


.0025 


.28 


— 


1.5 


1925 










.09 


3.98 


1.62 


.0013 


.0109 


.0093 


.0016 


.29 


— 


1.5 



Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from 
Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1925. [Averages 
of weekly determinations] 





Chestnut Hill Reservoir 


Southern Service Taps 


Year 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2 


Low Service, 
180 Boylston 

Street 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place 


1898 


207 


145 


111 


96 




1899 


224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 


248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901 


225 


149 


169 


162 


168 




203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903 


76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904 


347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905 


495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 


231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 


147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908 


162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 


198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 


216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911 


205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 


429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 


123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 


288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915 


163 


- 


128 


117 


134 




128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


1917 


178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 


1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 


92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920 


148 


86 


108 


113 


112 


1921 


103 


- 


83 


92 


92 


1922 


163 


— 


153 


160 


172 




229 


— 


178 


217 


230 


1924 


137 


— 


96 


150 


160 


1925 


144 


251 


120 


155 

1 


174 



P. D. 48 



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(Depth 

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uio^og 


iO 00 CO 00 CO >o O CM »o CO CO 

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iO CO O 00 CO <N -h CN t^ i-t l^- 

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Lake 

COCHITUATE l 

(Depth 

at Place of 

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62.0 Feet) 


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37.5 

41.1 

45.8 
47.8 
48.4 

49.0 
46.0 
39.5 


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41.2 
47.1 
51.2 
53.6 

51.0 
45.6 
39.1 




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Framingham l 

Reservoir No. 3 

(Depth 

at Place of 

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Sudbury 1 

Reservoir 

(Depth 

at Place of 

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54.5 Feet) 


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Wachusett * 

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at Place of 

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107 Feet) 


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Metropolitan 

Water Works 

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Belmont 

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Brookline 

Chelsea . 

Everett . 

Lexington 

Maiden . 

Medford 

Melrose 

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Newton 

Quincy . 

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P. D. 48 111 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services 
Metered, Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns 
in the Metropolitan Water District Dec. 31, 1925 



City or Town 



Arlington 
Belmont . 
Boston . 
Brookline 
Chelsea . 
Everett . 
Lexington 
Maiden . 
Medford 
Melrose . 
Milton . 
Nahant . 
Newton . 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Stoneham 
Swampscott 
Watertown 
Winthrop 

Totals 



Services 



4,940 
3,053 

92,382 
6,600 
5,547 
6,554 
1,804 
8,689 
8,405 
4,974 
3,161 
868 

11,500 

13,919 
5,792 

13,614 
2,009 
2,311 
4,440 
3,378 



203,940 



Meters 



4,940 
3,053 

88,788 
6,600 
5,538 
5,973 
1,794 
8,640 
8,405 
4,974 
3,161 
679 

11,431 

12,938 
4,982 

13,206 
2,009 
2,311 
4,440 
3,378 



197,240 



Per Cent 
of Services 
Metered 



100.00 

100.00 

96.11 

100.00 

99.84 

91.14 

99.45 

99.44 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

78.23 

99.40 

92.95 

86.02 

97.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 



96.71 



Services 
Used for 

Fire 
Purposes 

Only 



20 

8 

2,392 

27 
113 

41 
7 

67 

20 

22 
3 
2 

66 

26 
7 

62 
4 
8 

33 
5 



2,933 



Fire 
Hydrants 



635 
360 
11,121 
841 
422 
574 
286 
656 
827 
409 
496 
106 
1,236 
1,448 
367 
1,297 
162 
240 
509 
345 



22,337 



112 



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January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



114 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 











Amount of Bid 






1 


2 


3 




6 




4 


5 






Number 




Number 










of 


WORK 


of 


Next to 








Contract 




Bids 


Lowest 


Lowest 


Contractor 


1 


182 


Section 77, Mill Brook 
Valley Sewer, North 
Metropolitan S y s - 
tern, in Medford. 


7 


$120,825 00i 


$117,256 25 


Anthony Baruffaldi 
Co., Somerville. 


2 


19 


Section 78, Mill Brook 
Valley Sewer, North 
Metropolitan Sys- 
tem, in Medford and 
Arlington. 

• 


7 


115,790 00 


110,235 00 » 


Anthony Baruffaldi Co., 
Somerville. 

• 


3 


21 


Section 79, Mill Brook 
Valley Sewer, North 
Metropolitan Sys- 
tem, in Arlington. 


10 


47,621 00 


43,265 001 


Antony Cefalo, West 
Roxbury. 



Contracts relating to the 



202 



Surfacing a Public Way 
leading from Sea 
Street to the Metro- 
politan Sewerage 
embankment and 
over this embank- 
ment to a point in 
Rock Island Road, 
so-called, Hough's 
Neck, Quincy, Mass. 



$2,012 50 



$1,250 00 



Arthur W. Loud, 
Quincy. 



i Contract based upon this bid. 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 4 



the Year 1925 — Sewerage Division 
North Metropolitan System 



115 



Date of Con- 
tract 



July 3, 1924 



April 16, 1925 



8 



Date of 

Completion 

of work 



Dec. 17, 1925 



Dec. 3, 1925 



9 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1925 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench and 
embankment for 36-inch by 42-inch concrete 
sewer, $15.00 per lin. ft.; for earth excavation 
and refilling in trench and laying of pipe for 30- 
inch cast-iron pipe sewer and 16-inch and 20- 
inch cast-iron pipe siphon, $18.00 per lin. ft.; 
for earth or rock excavation or both and refilling 
in tunnel for 36-inch by 42-inch concrete or con- 
crete and brick sewer, $25.00 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes 
and special structures^ $40.00 per cu. yd.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in tunnel and 
tunnel shafts, $40.00 per cu. yd. ; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench, brook cross- 
ing, siphon and special structures, $15.00 per 
cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry 
in tunnel and tunnel shafts, $20.00 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement boulder, concrete masonry 
in trench, $10.00 per cu. yd. ; for spruce piles in 
trench and brook abutments, $0.50 per lin. ft.; 
for rock excavation in trench, $5.00 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench and 
laying of pipe for 20-inch and 24-inch Akron 
pipe main sewer, $5.00 per lin ft.; for earth or 
rock excavation or both in tunnel and laying of 
pipe for 20-inch Akron pipe main sewer, $50.00 
per lin. ft. ; for earth excavation and refilling in 
trench, and laying of pipe for 20-inch Akron 
pipe and 10-inch cast-iron pipe relief sewer, 
$5.00 per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick 
masonry in manholes and special structures, 
$36 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry in trench and special structures, $10.00 
per cu. yd.; for Portland cement boulder con- 
crete masonry in tunnel and tunnel shafts, 
$10.00 per cu. yd. ; for Portland cement boulder 
concrete masonry in trench, $8.00 per cu. yd.; 
for bank gravel refill around pipe in trench, 
$5.00 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in 
trench, $17.00 per cu. yd. 



10 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1925 



$136,136 62 



83,673 38 



South Metropolitan System 



Sept. 11, 1925 



Dec. 10, 1925 



For furnishing binding gravel, including spread- 
ing, grading and rolling in place, $1.70 per cu. 
yd.; for furnishing sand, or stone dust, includ- 
ing all spreading, $1.50 per ton; for all asphalt 
furnished and distributed in place, $0.13 per 
gallon. 



$1,563 50 



2 Contract completed. 



116 P. D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the Year 1925 — Sewerage Division 

— Concluded 
Summary of Contracts 



North Metropolitan System, 3 contracts 

South Metropolitan System, 1 contract 

Total of 4 contracts made and pending during the year 1925 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1925 



8219,810 00 
1,563 50 



8221,373 50 



P. D. 48 117 

Appendix No. 5 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL 

COURT ON JANUARY 19, 1926 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner respectfully presents the follow- 
ing abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for the year 
ending November 30, 1925, together with recommendations for legislation 
which it deems desirable, in accordance with the provisions of section 100 of 
Chapter 92 of the General Laws. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water acts, 
the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures for the con- 
struction and acquisition of works, and the balance available on December 1, 
1925, have been as follows: 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, including appropriations under St. 1920, 
c. 530, to provide for the service pipe lines, the construction of a reservoir in Arlington 
for the northern extra high service, to provide additional pumping machinery for the 
northern high service at Spot Pond and the southern high service at Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing stations, and appropriation under St. 1925, c. 302 for various improvements . $45,915,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan Water District, paid into 

Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320) 90,000 00 

Receipt from town of Brookline for admission to Metropolitan Water District, paid into 

Loan Fund (St. 1925, c. 308) 400,000 00 

Receipts from sales of property which are placed to the credit of the Metropolitan Water 
Loan Fund: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $10,164 72 

For period prior to December 1, 1924 287,839 93 

298,004 65 

$46,703,004 65 

Expended from Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $1,370,288 73 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 44,879,531 15 

46,249,819 88 

Balance December 1, 1925 $453,184 77 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the end of 
the fiscal year was $45,685,000, bonds to the amount of $1,138,000 having 
been issued during the year. Of the total amount issued, $41,398,000 were 
sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting to $4,287,000, was issued 
as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $45,178,000, 
as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $507,000 had 
been paid. During the fiscal year $85,000 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 
1925, to $22,478,585.22, an increase during the year of $1,082,242.32. 

The net debt on December 1, 1925, was $22,699,414.78, a decrease of 
$29,242.32. 

Maintenance 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and operation of works, for the 

year ending November 30, 1925 $785,900 00 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1924, of amount appropriated for inves- 
tigation, etc., of certain sources of water supply for the Metropolitan 
District H.849 16 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending November 30, 1925 . 5,487 59 

$803,236 75 

Expended for maintenance and operation for the year ending November 30, 1925 . . 736,269 14 

Balance December 1, 1925 $66,967 61 

Included in the foregoing balance is $1,719.22 remaining unexpended from 
the amount appropriated for investigation and experimentation for filtration 
of certain sources of water supply for the Metropolitan District, under Item 
673, chapter 126, Acts of 1923. 



118 P. D. 48 

The Commission has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1925, $86,228.99 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and power and 
from other proceeds from the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are applied 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of interest on the 
Metropolitan Water Loan, sinking fund requirements and expenses of main- 
tenance and operation of works, in reduction of the amount to be assessed 
upon the Metropolitan Water District for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to the 
District and to water companies, and from municipalities for admission to 
the District, have been as follows: — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities and towns of the Dis- 
trict, as provided by section 3 of the Metropolitan Water Act $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 1, 1924, applied to the 

Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907 149,238 35 

For the year beginning December 1, 1924, and ending November 30, 1925, applied to the 

Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by said last-named act . . 41,918 62 

$411,022 62 

Metropolitan Sewerage Works 

Construction 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for the con- 
struction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added 
to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for construction, are given 
below, as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construction under the various acts, 
including those for the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, North 
System enlargement and extensions, New Mystic sewer, Deer Island 
outfall extension, lowering sewer siphon under Maiden River, balance of 
appropriation under chapter 76, Resolves of 1915, for the Reading ex- 
tension, for the New Mystic sewer in Woburn and Winchester under 
chapter 529, Acts of 1922, and for the construction of the Mill Brook 
Valley sewer in Medford and Arlington, appropriated by chapter 116, 

Acts of 1924 ... $8,288,500 00 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources, which 
are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan System: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 101 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 87,566 04 

$8,376,167 04 

Expended from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 178,095 36 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 7,786,023 03 ___..,_ oft 

7,964,118 69 

Balance December 1, 1925 $412,048 65 

t 

South Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construction under the various acts, 
applied to the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset 
valley sewer, High-level sewer and extensions (including Wellesley 
branch), and an additional appropriation authorized by c. 525, Acts of 
1920, for additional Ward Street station pumping plant, a new force 
main from the Quincy station, a new pump and other equipment at the 
Quincy station and an additional appropriation for the Wellesley ex- 
tension, authorized under c. 529, Acts of 1922 $10,002,912 00 

Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources, 
which are placed to the credit of the South Metropolitan System: 

For the period ending December 1, 1925 24,599 ol 

Expended from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System: 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer $°0 0, U4b Zi 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer . 911,ool 4o 

On account of the High-level sewer and extensions: 

For the period prior to December 1, 1925 »,^M,»»l zo ^ ^ 

Balance December 1, 1925 $23,052 63 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at the end 
of the fiscal year was $18,291,412, bonds to the amount of $650,000 having 
been issued during the year. Of the total amount issued, $15,440,912 were 
sinking fund bonds and the remainder, amounting to $2,850,500, was serial 
bonds. 



P. D. 48 119 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was $17,689,412 
as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $125,500 had 
been paid during the year, $602,000 having been paid to December 1, 1925. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,929,500 were 
issued for the North Metropolitan System, and $9,759,912 for the South 
Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Sinking Fund 
amounted on December 1, 1925, to $7,951,398.70, of which $4,822,233.54 was 
on account of the North Metropolitan System, and $3,129,165.16 was on 
account of the South Metropolitan System, an increase during the year of 
$597,864.93. 

The net debt on December 1, 1925, was $9,738,013.30, a decrease of 
$73,364.93. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System is 
$1,725,500 in serial bonds, of which $359,000 has been paid, and $1,125,000 
for the South Metropolitan System, of which $243,000 has been paid. 

Maintenance 

North Metropolitan System 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1925 $340,200 00 

Receipts from pumping and other sources, which are returned to the appropriation: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 . 241 62 



$340,441 62 
Expended for maintenance and operation of Metropolitan Sewerage Works, North System, 

for the year ending November 30, 1925 298,966 13 

Balance December 1, 1925 $41,475 49 

Balance of appropriation under item 6703^, c. 494, Acts 1923, reappropriated by Resolve 
17, Acts 1924, to cover expenses relative to additional sewers in the town of Arlington 
and the city of Medford 18,338 19 

Expended to November 30, 1925 16,954 40 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,383 79 

South Metropolitan System 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1925 $213,100 00 

Receipts from sales of property, reimbursements and for pumping, which are returned to 
the appropriation: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 241 23 

$213,341 23 
Expended for maintenance and operation of Metropolitan Sewerage Works, South System, 

for the year ending November 30, 1925 188,651 13 

Balance December 1, 1925 $24,690 10 

The balance of $412,048.65 on account of construction in the North 
Metropolitan System consists almost entirely of the amount appropriated and 
remaining unexpended for constructing the Mill Brook valley sewer in Med- 
ford and Arlington, under chapter 116, Acts of 1924, and the unexpended 
balance remaining for the completion of the New Mystic sewer and the 
Reading extension. 

The balance of $23,052.63 remaining unexpended on account of construc- 
tion in the South Metropolitan Sewerage System consists of the amount re- 
maining for the completion of the additions to the pumping plant at Ward 
Street pumping station, and also amounts appropriated under chapter 529 
of the Acts of 1922 for the completion of the Wellesley extension of the High- 
level sewer, for the construction of a new force main from the Quincy pump- 
ing station and also for a new pump and other equipment at the Quincy 
pumping station. 

Metropolitan Parks Division 

Construction 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for the 
construction of Metropolitan Parks and Boulevards, Charles River bridges, 
Charles River Basin, North Beacon Street Bridge, Nantasket Beach, the 
receipts which have been added to the loan funds, the expenditures for the 
acquisition of property and construction of works, and the balances available 
on December 1, 1925, have been as follows: — 



120 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund $9,093,043 96 

Receipts added to loan before June 1, 1901 198,942 81 

$9,291,986 77 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $110 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 9,262,649 13 

9,262,759 13 

Balance December 1, 1925 $29,227 64 

The amount of the Metropolitan Parks Loan bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $9,809,000, no bonds having been issued during the year. Of 
the total amount issued, $9,485,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the 
remainder, amounting to $324,000, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $9,588,750, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $220,250 had been 
paid. During the fiscal year $19,250 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Parks Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 
1925, to $5,384,712.70, an increase during the year of $243,454.76. 

The net debt on December 1, 1925, was $4,204,037.30, a decrease of 
$262,704.76. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II $9,404,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc " 29,934 16 

$9,433,934 16 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $631,158 69 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 7,790,649 13 

8,421,807 82 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,012,126 34 

The amount of the Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series II., bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $4,603,937.50, bonds to the amount of $567,500 
having been issued during the year. Of the total amount issued, $2,567,500 
were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting to $2,036,437.50 
was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $4,122,250, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $481,687.50 had 
been paid. During the fiscal year $66,493.75 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series II., Sinking Fund amounted on 
December 1, 1925, to $1,367,193.39, an increase during the year of $61,157.50. 

The net debt on December 1, 1925, was $2,755,056. 61, an increase of 
$439,848.75. 

Charles River Basin Loan 

Charles River Basin Loan $4,500,000 00 

Receipts added to loan 9,368 91 

$4,509,368 91 
Expenditures 

For the period prior to December 1, 1925 4,472,862 22 

Balance December 1, 1925 $36,506 69 

The amount of the Charles River Basin Loan bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $4,500,000, no bonds having been issued during the year. Of 
the total amount issued, $4,125,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the 
remainder, amounting to $375,000, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $4,368,000, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $132,000 had been 
paid. During the fiscal year $10,000 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Charles River Basin Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 
1925, to $1,647,740.17, an increase during the year of $90,609.86. 

The net debt on December 1, 1925, was $2,720,259.83, a decrease of 
$100,609.86. 



P. D. 48 121 

Charles River Bridges Loan 
Charles River Bridges Loan $1,825,000 00 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $408,435 83 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 327,505 60 

$735,941 43 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,089,058 57 

During the fiscal year Charles River Bridges Loan notes were issued to the 
amount of $1,800,000; $800,000 were paid during the year, leaving the 
amount of outstanding notes $1,000,000. 

The net debt December 1, 1925, was $1,000,000. 

North Beacon Street Bridge Loan 
North Beacon Street Bridge Loan $175,000 00 

Expenditures 
For the period prior to December 1, 1925 174,853 50 

Balance December 1, 1925 $146 50 

Nantasket Beach Loan 
Nantasket Beach Loan $705,881 50 

Expenditures 
For the period prior to December 1, 1925 $705,881 50 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Loan 
Chapter 442, Acts of 1924 $600,000 00 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $133,583 37 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 354,702 36 

488,285 73 

Balance December 1, 1925 $111,714 27 

Northern Traffic Route Loan 
Chapter 489, Acts of 1924 ' $1,800,000 00 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 $113,559 05 

For the period prior to December 1, 1924 5,023 56 

118,582 61 

Balance December 1, 1925 $1,681,417 39 

Metropolitan Parks Trust Fund 

Receipts for year ending November 30, 1925 $103 71 

Receipts for the period prior to December 1, 1924 40,673 21 

$40,776 92 

Expenditures 
For the period prior to December 1, 1925 38,106 50 

Balance December 1, 1925 .' . $2,670 42 

Edwin U. Curtis Memorial Trust Fund 

Receipts for the year ending November 30, 1925 $40 03 

Receipts for period prior to December 1, 1924 1,334 37 

$1,374 40 



122 



P. D. 48 



Maintenance 
Metropolitan Parks 



Metropolitan Parka Maintenance Fund: 

General 

Special: 

Band concerts 

Clearing woods $2,883 86 

Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 694 72 

Westerly Border Road, West Roxbury 

Parkwav $40,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 28,129 59 

Nahant Beach Playground . . . $5,000 00 
Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 2,65128 

Improvement of land adjoining Alewife 

Brook $5,500 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 2,481 89 

Eliot Circle, Revere St. Roadway . . $90,000 00 
Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 26,633 05 

Electric Lighting System, Revere Beach 

Reconstruction roadway from Brookline Street to 
Massachusetts Avenue 

Acquiring land of Lawrence estate 

Investigation, Spring Street, Dedham . 
Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards: 

General . 

Special: 

Blue Hill River Road 

Sidewalks, Blue Hills Parkway . . $6,000 00 

Expended to December 1, 1924 . . 1,006 88 



Boulevard, Hyde Park District 
Expended to December 1, 1924 

Stoneham-Wakefield Parkway . 
Installation electric lighting system 
Boulevard, Boston and Brookline 
Resurfacing boulevards and parkways 

Charles River Basin maintenance 

Nantasket Beach maintenance 

Wellington Bridge maintenance 

Bunker Hill maintenance .... 



$10,000 00 
8,499 37 



Appropria- 
tion, 1925 



$778,395 38 
20,000 00 

2,189 14 

11,870 41 
2,348 72 

3,018 11 

63,366 95 
50,000 00 

33,200 00 

160,000 00 

500 00 

421,000 00 

75,000 00 

4,993 12 



1,500 63 

5,000 00 

50,000 00 

222,000 00 

200,000 00 

208,500 00 

80,500 00 

17,000 00 

10,500 00 



Expended, 
1925 



$726,649 98 
19,668 56 

677 85 

6,229 03 
381 22 

2,694 88 



51,211 38 
33,854 25 

33,200 00 

160,000 00 

493 35 

392,271 88 



734 16 



1,487 23 

687 50 

33,348 50 

1,853 94 

170,070 94 

202,803 51 

80,354 47 

16,041 11 

9,537 48 



Balance 

December 

1, 1925 



$51,745 40 
331 44 

1,511 29 

5,641 38 
1,967 50 

323 23 



12,155 57 
16,145 75 



6 65 
28,728 12 
75,000 00 

4,258 96 



13 40 

4,312 50 

16,651 50 

220,146 06 

29,929 06 

5,696 49 

145 53 

958 89 

962 52 



Receipts: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 
For the period prior to December 1, 1924 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 
For the period prior to December 1, 1924 



Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund 



Balance December 1, 1925 



Bunker Hill Monument: 



General Revenue 



Receipts: 

For the year ending November 30, 1925 
For the period prior to December 1, 1924 



$177,303 78 
2,636,352 53 



$187,025 53 
2,328,512 71 



$4,583 10 
12,097 80 



$2,813,656 31 



2,515,538 24 
$298,118 07 



$16,680 90 



THE PUBLIC 



■ *.'• .■ «r, 



-A 



RARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



b.zt: ton. 



-~ ..-— *-.•.■..